Samuel Merritt University Ranks 1st in California, 5th Nationwide for Post-Graduation Salaries on College Scorecard

Posted on Jun 25, 2019 in Affiliates, People, Scroll Images

OAKLAND, Calif.Samuel Merritt University (SMU) alumni earn the highest salaries among undergraduates from all other California universities and from nearly all schools nationwide, according to the recently updated College Scorecard from the U.S. Department of Education.

Alumni from SMU’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs earn a median salary of $111,100 a decade after beginning their studies, higher than 562 other California higher education institutions. Nationwide, SMU, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network, comes in fifth for post-graduation earnings — beating out 5,868 other schools, including MIT and Harvard University.

SMU has consistently come out on top in California for the critical metric of “salary after attending” since the federal government launched the College Scorecard in 2015. Results are based on the average reported earnings of former undergraduate students who received federal loans or grants.

“This is great news for SMU’s alumni and our current undergraduate students,” said President Dr. Ching-Hua Wang. “It demonstrates that an SMU education prepares students well for successful and rewarding careers.”

Transparency in Higher Ed

President Barack Obama initiated the College Scorecard to increase transparency in higher education and help guide prospective students in selecting a school to attend.  Its metrics were intended to hold colleges accountable for cost, quality, and value by offering information that focuses on getting what he called “the most bang for your educational buck.”

The interactive, fact-finding tool uses federal data to compare schools based on metrics such as college costs and graduation rates. Unlike popular college ranking systems like U.S. News & World Report, the scorecard includes post-attendance earnings as an indicator of student outcomes.

“The College Scorecard confirms that SMU graduates receive an excellent return on their investment,” said Terry Nordstrom, vice president of enrollment and student services. “Samuel Merritt University prides itself on providing an academic experience that enables our graduates to thrive in challenging and fulfilling professions.”

New Primary Care Office in Antioch Celebrated

Posted on Jun 25, 2019 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

New Space Offers Patients Larger Exam Rooms, Light-Filled Spaces and Beautiful Art

ANTIOCH, Calif. –It’s official: the spacious primary care office that opened in Antioch has been blessed, toured and admired by Sutter Health leaders, East Bay government officials and community members.

As a crowd watched, Jimmy Hu, M.D., Area CEO, East Bay, Sutter Bay Medical Foundation, cut the red ribbon, and Dawn Morrow, a representative from Contra Costa County Supervisor Diane Burgis’ office presented a welcome plaque to Dr. Hu and Samuel Santoro, M.D., CEO, Sutter East Bay Medical Group.

Jimmy Hu, M.D., Area CEO, East Bay, Sutter Bay Medical Foundation and Samuel Santoro, M.D., president and CEO, Sutter East Bay Medical Group accept a welcome plaque from Dawn Morrow, district representative for Contra Costa County Supervisor Diane Burgis.

“We are proud to show you the space,” said Dr. Hu. “The best thing you can do in an organization is grow, and we know East Contra Costa is expanding and we are here to support the community and provide excellent care.”

About 100 people attended the mixer on June 13 that was organized by Sutter Health, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation (SEBMF) and the regional Chambers of Commerce including Antioch, Brentwood, Discovery Bay, Oakley, Pittsburg, Rio Vista and West Pittsburg.

Dr. Hu explained to the gathering that a gift from Better Health East Bay, a philanthropic group in the Sutter Health network, enabled SEBMF to renovate almost 13,000 square feet on the second floor of the care center at 4053 Lone Tree Way in Antioch. After months of construction, the expansion was completed in April and the primary care doctors and their staff moved from cramped quarters on the first floor to newly designed modern offices on the second floor.

“We are proud to be here, and proud to show off the new digs,” Dr. Santoro added. “State of the art, 21st century health care is being delivered right here.”

He told the crowd: “Our Sutter values are safe, personal, affordable and accessible health care. We have an obligation to you to deliver on that promise.”

The attendees mingled and nibbled on appetizers as a DJ played various tunes. In addition to Morrow, representatives and local officials attending the event included Tito Ramos from Rep. Jerry McNerney’s office, Antioch Mayor Sean Wright, Tricia Piquero, Brentwood Chamber of Commerce co-president, and Richard Pagano, Antioch Chamber of Commerce CEO.

The building is a hub for SEBMF since it also has suites that house an Urgent Care, lab, radiology, OB/GYN, neurology, podiatry, urology, cardiology, gastroenterology and general surgery.

The primary care team, including family and internal medicine and pediatricians, is a large one: eight doctors, nine medical assistants, a coordinator, a licensed vocational nurse, a registered nurse and a clinical operations manager.

They are glad to be seeing the patients in larger exam rooms with new equipment and more desks and office space for clinicians. There are 18 exam rooms and a procedure room; the space is filled with light and art, as well as sofas and comfortable chairs.

 

 

‘Black Hawk Down’ Drill Prepares Roseville for Mass Casualty Event

Posted on Jun 19, 2019 in Expanding Access, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Emergency personnel treat and transport a moulaged patient from the Black Hawk “crash.”

ROSEVILLE, Calif. — A military Black Hawk helicopter bringing trauma patients to Sutter Roseville Medical Center was struck by a drone and crash-landed on the SRMC helipad, with about a dozen injured victims crying for help. That was the scenario facing Sutter Roseville’s emergency services team, which partnered with the Roseville and Rocklin fire departments, the Army National Guard and others for an emergency response drill called “Black Hawk Down” on Wednesday, June 19.

Erik Angle, Sutter Roseville’s emergency preparedness coordinator, told Fox 40 during a television interview that it’s important to work with other community agencies and practice these types of scenarios to “know who to talk to and know each other’s protocols and how you would respond so you can work together seamlessly. And that’s critical for any community to have.”

Sutter Roseville registered nurses triage patients at the trauma center entrance.

Sutter Roseville Medical Center is the premier Level II trauma center for a nine-county region that includes the Sierra Nevada and foothills. Victims of fires and other natural disasters and mass-casualty events could be brought to Sutter Roseville for treatment, especially since it is the only Northern California hospital that has a helipad that can support large military-type helicopters like the Black Hawk and even a Chinook.

The backdrop to Wednesday’s drill was the Sutter Roseville construction project that includes an expansion of the hospital’s emergency services, which will double the size and capabilities of the current Emergency Department. Built into that expansion are elements that will be very beneficial during a mass casualty situation, including the ability to convert the new E.D. lobby into a treatment area in a community emergency.

“To practice these (emergency situations) ahead of time is critical,” Angle said. “That way if they do happen in reality, we’ve already worked out all the kinks.”

Already, Angle is planning another community emergency disaster drill early next year to be staged in the new portion of the Emergency Department right before it opens, so that they are well-prepared for any emergency once the new building opens.

Safari-Themed ‘Bring Your Child to Work Day’ Gives Career Exploration A Whole Meaning

Posted on Jun 19, 2019 in Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SACRAMENTO, Calif.–Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento hosted a “Take Your Child to Work Day,” but this is much different than the usual one where the children just sit around and watch Mom or Dad work. More than a dozen stations were set up for children to learn about healthcare and try their hand at specialized skills.

Among the stations:

  • A giant-sized game of “Operation” where kids can test their surgery skills.
  • A machine will “X-ray” the children’s arms in real time.
  • Kids were able to pet and interact with dogs used for therapy throughout the hospital.
  • The hospital’s germ-zapping robot will be displayed to show how it helps to kill germs in patient rooms.

“I love our pediatric services, and I love kids,” said Trisha Klaassen, R.N., SMCS clinical nurse educator who helped construct the oversized “Operation” game. “I wanted to find a good way to teach them about what we do here and how we teach.”

It was presented with a safari theme—featuring exotic animals (not real, of course!) such as lions, zebras, elephants and monkeysadding to the fun and adventure of the day.

The event is really a celebration of Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento teams and the work they do every day. Staff put on the entire event themselves and look forward to it each year.

According to a new list by Forbes magazine, Sutter Health ranked 26th on California’s list and took the top spot for employers headquartered in the Sacramento region.

The Dog-tor Will See You Now

Posted on Jun 18, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Carousel, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images

Therapy Dog Cares for Patients at CPMC Van Ness Campus

Posey with 16 year old pediatric patient Buddy Pendergast

SAN FRANCISCO–Anxiety and fear are common issues that pediatricians and staff address every day when caring for children inside Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center Emergency Department. They enlist child life specialists to assist, as well as a very special team member, Posey the Therapy Dog.

Posey partners with emergency department pediatrician, Vince Tamariz, M.D., to see young patients who come in for assistance with an illness or injury. While Dr. Tamariz addresses the health issue, Posey addresses the stress children face when coming into this unfamiliar environment. With a soft and unhurried approach, Posey can easily distract a child from the frightening medical activity that is underway and bring a sense of calm and curiosity to the child, reducing the fear and anxiety.

“When Posey walks into the room kids have something to focus on that is a distraction from what is happening with their care,” said Dr. Tamariz. “Even parents admit that Posey helps relieve the stress they feel resulting from the need to bring their child to the emergency department.”

When there is a break in the activity of the emergency department, Posey can be found on the pediatric floor of the hospital. Posey makes her rounds, checking in on young patients to see if anyone needs her loving assistance. When she walks into a room spirits lift and children have a break from the ailments that bring them to the hospital. While patients love to see Posey and pet her soft fur, she will also hop up on the bed—when invited—to lay beside a patient who may have difficulty reaching her or getting out of the bed.

Many studies show that petting a dog makes you feel good; it increases oxytocin in the body, which amplifies feelings of happiness and empathy. It also lowers the heart rate, decreases blood pressure and reduces cortisol (the stress hormone). These results can make a big difference for children in the hospital.

Specially-Designed Pacifier Uses Music to Teach Premature Infants How to Feed

Posted on Jun 14, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Pediatric Care, Quality

Parents’ Voice Singing a Lullaby Rewards Baby for Sucking

Alissa and Charles O’Neill with baby Olive

SAN FRANCISCO—Premature babies often lack a developed sucking reflex, leaving them unable to feed orally. And the inability to feed is a common reason new born babies remain hospitalized after birth. To help develop the sucking reflex more quickly, California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), part of Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network of care, is using a new device called a Pacifier-Activated Lullaby (PAL) in its Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

According to CPMC’s music therapist Elisha Madsen, MME, MT-BC, recent studies show that about 70 percent of the premature infants who receive PAL treatment respond positively to it. They increase their ability to eat on their own, gain weight, and go home from the NICU earlier.

Charles O’Neill and baby Olive at home

The PAL rewards and motivates babies to suck on a pacifier to help strengthen their sucking reflex. The special pacifier is attached to a sensor module that measures the strength of the baby’s sucking reflex. When the PAL detects that the baby has sucked on the pacifier to the predetermined strength, the baby earns a reward –a lullaby recorded by the baby’s own mom or dad.

Madsen explains that hearing their parent singing a lullaby motivates babies to continue sucking on the pacifier –which improves the sucking reflex. “Within two and a half minutes, she says, “most babies learn they will have to suck on the pacifier to receive their music reward.”

“It’s exciting for us at CPMC to be able to offer parents a direct role in their baby’s care where they are the reason the baby’s health is improving,” said Madsen. “Parents just light up when they see their baby responding to their singing voices and learn the skills they need to eat and go home. It is just precious to see this reaction.”

Dad’s Best Father’s Day Gift? Bonding with Baby!

Posted on Jun 14, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality

SAN FRANCISCO –On this Father’s Day we celebrate the bonding between dads and their newborn babies. While the focus of childbirth and postnatal care typically revolves around mother and baby, and with good reason, research shows that dads can also have an incredible impact on their babies in the days after birth.

Fathers who engage in skin-to-skin contact, often called kangaroo care, with their newborns can positively impact their child’s physical and emotional health immediately. Skin-to-skin contact helps create a bond between dad and baby and helps elevate a father’s natural parenting instincts. Practicing kangaroo care also helps dads become more sensitive and aware of their baby’s needs, and more confident about their parenting skills.

For the baby the benefits are many, says Terri Slagle, M.D., director of the neonatal intensive care unit at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center’s Van Ness Campus hospital. “Frequent skin-to-skin contact increases brain development and decreases stress responses. By holding his baby to his chest, dad creates a sense of security which can lead to a reduction in irritability and improved sleep, and helps to foster a regular and stable heart rhythm and breathing pattern,” Dr. Slagle says.  “It can also lead to weight gain for the baby as he or she develops better absorption and digestion of nutrients following skin-to-skin contact.”

Simply put, skin-to-skin contact stimulates the baby’s immune system and promotes physical and emotional wellbeing for both dad and baby while developing a stronger bond for the long term.