Women’s Services

Collaboration Leads to Reduction in Low-Risk, First-Birth C-sections

Posted on Apr 17, 2019 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Women's Services

By Katarina Lannér-Cusin, M.D., administrative medical director, Women’s Services, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

 

BERKELEY, Calif. – One of the advantages that an integrated healthcare delivery network like Sutter Health has is that its clinicians are able to improve quality by studying the experience and practice patterns of fellow clinicians. An example of this is our work to support vaginal delivery by reducing the rate of cesarean sections for low-risk, first-time births.

Katarina Lannér-Cusin, M.D., Administrative Medical Director, Women’s Services, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

Sutter Health’s low-risk, first-birth C-section rate is among the lowest in California, with nine hospitals receiving recognition in 2017. Sutter’s average rate of 21.2 percent is lower than the state’s Healthy People 2020 target of 23.9 percent and the 2016 California Maternity Quality Care Collaborative target of 22.2 percent.
Sutter’s integrated network enables sharing of best practices and real-time data for continual process and quality improvement, which allows the network to outperform state and national averages in many quality measures and improve outcomes for the communities it serves. Sutter hospitals are leaders in California in lowering C-section rates—notably low-risk, first-birth C-section rates.

Sutter is a member of the California Maternity Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC), a multi-stakeholder organization committed to ending preventable morbidity, mortality and racial health disparities in California. Partnering with CMQCC and the California Health Care Foundation, Sutter is leading a labor culture campaign to proactively educate first-time mothers about C-sections and encourage them to engage with their care teams to support vaginal birth and avoid C-sections for low-risk pregnancies.

There are several key drivers that have been instrumental to achieve real progress in decreasing C-section rates in the Sutter network of care.

• The first and most important driver is effective communication and teamwork—a joint commitment by the clinical team (nurses, midwife and physician) to create a great supportive environment for patients.

• The second driver is alignment on best practices for labor support, including collaborative labor management and education. Sutter adopted a checklist in labor and delivery that establishes parameters clinicians need to complete before deciding on a C-section. The teams work collaboratively using the checklist to ensure that all best practices for supporting a vaginal birth have been implemented. Additionally, labor support education has been developed for nurses, midwives and physicians.

• The third driver is maternal agency—a birth preference sheet was created to educate new mothers about choices they make that may increase their likelihood of a vaginal delivery and give them the opportunity to talk with their physician or midwife about these choices before birth.

• Finally, a large component of lowering low-risk, first-time birth C-section rates is the open sharing of physician-level rates among peers. This transparency creates the opportunity for dialogue and shared learning among clinicians. Each group is encouraged to discuss these rates internally and come up with a plan to address any issues uncovered by the data.

Sutter Health is working to ensure that every patient receives the highest quality maternity care for herself and for her baby. For more information, please visit Pregnancy and Childbirth Services.

CPMC Advanced Maternity Care with Nations Highest Maternity Age

Posted on Apr 4, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Carousel, Scroll Images, Women's Services

SAN FRANCISCO – Yuan-Da Fan, M.D., chairman of the obstetrics and gynecology department at California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), a part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network, recently interviewed with Robert Honda of NBC Bay Area public affairs program, Asian Pacific America, to discuss the trend toward older motherhood.

While this is a national trend it is particularly noticeable in the Bay Area. At CPMC the average age of mother delivering babies is the highest in the nation at 34.4 years of age. The oldest mother to deliver a baby at CPMC was 58.

“Across the entire country the maternity age is getting older, especially in San Francisco where we have highly educated and professional women”, said Dr. Fan. “Many women pursuing higher educational degrees and advancement in their careers are delaying motherhood until they achieve these goals.”

While delayed motherhood is increasingly becoming more common, Dr. Fan cautions that it carries additional risk. “Advanced maternal age, mothers over age 35, is associated with higher risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, cesarean delivery, complications during labor, and fetal abnormalities” Dr. Fan added.

Women over age 35 are advised to consult with their OBGYN provider to determine their risks associated with having a baby. Providers look at family background, medical history and other determinants to assess if the risks are great or not.

“We intend to continue providing the safest care to our older and complicated patients while also extending our support for low intervention births,” Dr. Fan stated. “Our goal is to celebrate each and every birth with successful outcomes and happy memories for all of our patients.”

 

Tiny Twin Fighters Will Win Your Heart

Posted on Mar 8, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images, Uncategorized, Women's Services

The road ahead it twists and turns .  . . but I keep, keep on pushing through,” sings John Isaac in the soulful song titled I Get Up. This song is the perfect anthem for Mason and Logan, fraternal twins, who need the specialized care of doctors and nurses at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus. The neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU, is a special section of the hospital dedicated to babies born early or with delicate medical  needs. In the NICU babies gain weight and develop a little more every day until they are healthy enough to go home.

At Sutter we want all of our patients to be at their strongest and the spirit of these two twin fighters matches our mission and echoes these poignant lyrics: “With every step my heart it pounds, yes I’m sure I’ve had my doubts, but I must keep, keep on pushing through. Yeah I get up, and I may fall right back down – but your love lifts me back to solid ground.” Thank you, Mason and Logan, for showing us how to keep on pushing through.

 

Baby Bragging Rights: First Baby Born on Opening Day of San Francisco’s Newest Hospital is a Boy

Posted on Mar 4, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation, Women's Services

SAN FRANCISCO – A sweet baby boy gets bragging rights as the first baby born at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital. The baby boy was born to Monika and Mario Porto at 11:44 a.m. on March 3. Baby Porto was delivered by Teresa Safer, M.D., an OB/GYN at Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation. The little guy weighs 7 lbs., 2 oz. and is 20 inches long. Baby Porto will soon be settling into his San Francisco home where his older sister is eagerly awaiting his arrival!

The family arrived on Sunday, as CPMC was preparing to move patients from the California Campus to the Van Ness Campus. Mom was admitted just as the new Labor and Delivery Department was opening and staff were excited to provide care to the first laboring mom at the newly opened hospital.

“We were hoping we would deliver at the new hospital just because it is closer to home,” said mama Monika. “We had toured both hospitals and of course this one had all the shiny new stuff and nice delivery rooms so we were excited, and we timed it just right – even though it was all up to him.”

CPMC is part of Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network. From physician offices to hospitals to outpatient care centers and home services, Sutter teams proudly support the more than 3 million people in their care—nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world.

 

Racing Against Time, Mobile Stroke Unit Treats First Stroke Patient

Posted on Feb 11, 2019 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Scroll Images, Women's Services

The Sutter Health Mobile Stroke Unit team got the call they had been preparing for and raced into action.

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Designed for the Times: New San Francisco Hospital Embraces Mature Moms

Posted on Jan 17, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Carousel, Quality, Scroll Images, Women's Services

The CPMC Women and Children’s Center at the new Van Ness Campus will set the standard for hospital-based childbirth for a growing number of moms in their 30s and beyond.

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