Wellness

Do Adults Need a Measles Shot?

Posted on Mar 18, 2019 in Scroll Images, Uncategorized, Wellness

SAN FRANCISCO – Measles, which authorities thought was eliminated as a public health threat in the United States in 2000, has re-emerged in increasing numbers this winter. Through March 14, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported 268 individual U.S. cases—73 of them in Washington state, in a community where only 78 percent of the school-aged population is vaccinated.

By comparison, the CDC reported a total of 372 cases of measles during 2018.

In California, this year’s CDC figures include five Bay Area residents (three adult, two pediatric) in Santa Clara, San Mateo, San Francisco and Santa Cruz counties who have contracted measles. Two of these cases were contracted from another person on an airplane flight.

In the past, many thousands of Americans developed measles each year. Many would die, and many more would develop complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis.

“We have fewer deaths now because of the vaccine—and only because of the vaccine,” says Jeffrey Silvers, M.D., Sutter Health’s medical director of Pharmacy and Infection Control.

Measles is a ferociously contagious disease: The number of cases one case generates on average over the course of its infectious period is 10 to 18, compared with two or 3 for influenza.

“The only treatment for measles is prevention,” says Dr. Silvers. “Vaccination keeps you from developing the disease but also from spreading the virus. When immunization lags, outbreaks can occur. After all, many people move to America from countries without immunization programs, and global travel in general increases the chance of measles spreading to vulnerable populations.

“The vaccine works well. Two doses are about 97 percent effective at preventing measles. One dose is about 93 percent effective.”

So do you need the vaccine now if you received it as a child?

Two doses of the vaccine are required for people embarking on international travel, says Dr. Silvers—and for healthcare workers as well as people who received the inactive vaccine used from 1963 to 1967.

“Everybody else only needs one dose,” he says. “If you have been properly vaccinated, you don’t need to get it again.

“But if you received the vaccine as a child during the early to mid-1960s, you should discuss with your physician the possibility of receiving it again.”

Flu: Are You In the Clear this Year?

Posted on Feb 6, 2019 in Scroll Images, Wellness

Even in a mild flu year experts urge you to take the virus seriously. Read More

Healthy ‘GOOOOOOOOOOOOOAAAAAALLLLL’: Championing Wellness through Youth Soccer

Posted on Jan 22, 2019 in Scroll Images, Wellness

Kids these days.

They are their own mini versions of professional athletes. Year-round sports have superseded the seasonal variety—and this specialized focus has captivated the attention of kids and families alike.

Seeing an opportunity to team up with the youth soccer movement, Sutter Health will serve as the San Jose Earthquakes’ presenting sponsor of the Quakes Academy youth soccer teams and Quakes Academy jerseys.

 

“Physical activity, at any stage of life, can play an important part in one’s health and wellness goals,” said Richard Gayle, M.D., orthopedic surgeon at Palo Alto Medical Foundation and one of the Earthquakes’ team doctors. “The youth soccer movement is particularly inspiring, and youth sports overall are a natural way for our communities to come together. We appreciate the opportunity to align with the Quakes Academy to champion healthy habits.”

The Quakes Academy has blossomed in recent years, with both boys’ and girls’ teams producing youth national team-caliber players. Most recently, U-17 midfielder Sophie Jones – a Duke University commit – competed for the United States at the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup in Uruguay. The boys’ academy has produced five Homegrown Players to date, including former U.S. U-20 goalkeeper JT Marcinkowski and 2017 MLS Rookie of the Year finalist Nick Lima.

The Earthquakes and Sutter Health will work in tandem to provide physical and mental wellness, stress management, and nutritional education programming for all Quakes Academy players. They will launch a web portal later this year filled with information in each of those categories, which will serve as a wellness resource for all athletes in the Bay Area.

Sutter Health’s work with the San Jose Earthquakes focuses on numerous aspects of health and wellness. Sutter will continue to present Get Earthquakes Fit, a program targeted at fighting childhood obesity in Northern California. The program has been adopted at more than 35 schools annually since 2016, impacting more than 16,000 students to date. Doctors at Palo Alto Medical Foundation, part of Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network, will continue serving as the Earthquakes’ official team physicians. The doctors, who specialize in orthopedics and primary care, use their experience and expertise to support Earthquakes players so they may reach their peak performance.

In addition to supporting healthy activity in communities, not-for-profit Sutter Health gives back to communities in other ways, too. Sutter Health’s total community benefit investment was $612 million in 2017. These funds supported traditional charity care, unreimbursed Medi-Cal costs, health education and community clinics. Learn more about ways Sutter cares for Northern California at sutterpartners.org.

Physician’s Longtime Free Flu Clinics Continue in Tracy

Posted on Oct 5, 2018 in Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Uncategorized, Wellness

TRACY, Calif. — One of the longest-running free flu clinic programs in Northern California will continue this year with two opportunities for San Joaquin County residents at Sutter Tracy Community Hospital, with the first once slated for Saturday from 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Free flu vaccinations have been given in Tracy since the early 1960s, when longtime San Joaquin County obstetrician and medical leader Audrey Glover, M.D., saw a need in the community to prevent the spread of the disease during the flu season. Through the years, about 60,000 free flu shots have been administered to local residents.

“The flu was devastating during those early years,” said longtime friend Dan Schack, a Tracy engineer. “Dr. Glover felt there was a need to provide the vaccinations for free.” Read More

Recommendations on Coping with Poor Air Quality Due to Wildfires

Posted on Aug 5, 2018 in People, Uncategorized, We're Awesome, Wellness

LAKEPORT, Calif.–Sutter Lakeside Hospital continues to be threatened by the Mendocino Complex fire. The fire, which includes the River and Ranch Fires, began Saturday, July 28, and to this date is still raging

As the fires continue, the air quality is poor. When pollution is bad, it can irritate your eyes, nose, and throat, cause shortness of breath, aggravate asthma and other respiratory conditions.

Air quality has been rated unsafe to unhealthy for sensitive groups who live near the fires, and it is also rated unhealthy for those who live in the Sacramento area. Poor air quality and smoky air also have been reported in the East Bay, including Walnut Creek and the Tri-Valley area.

Read More

Memorial Hospital Los Banos Offers Expanded Hours to Community

Posted on Jun 28, 2018 in Expanding Access, Wellness

Memorial Hospital Los Banos Rural Health Clinic will offer expanded hours to the community beginning on July 1.

LOS BANOS, Calif.  Memorial Hospital Los Banos Rural Health Clinic will be expanding its hours beginning on July 1.

The clinic will be open from 8 a.m.-midnight Monday-Saturday at its current location, 1253 West I St., Los Banos, CA 93635.

“Expanding the clinic’s hours will allow us to dedicate resources to walk-in appointments and same day appointments so we can continue to provide outstanding health care to our community,” said Doug Archer, administrator, Memorial Hospital Los Banos. “We are excited about the continued success and growth of the Rural Health Clinic.”

To schedule an appointment, call the clinic at (209) 710-6333. For more information on the clinic, visit the Sutter Health website.