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Sutter Hospitals Honored for High Quality Stroke and Cardiac Care

Posted on Aug 5, 2020 in Carousel, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Twelve hospitals within Sutter’s not-for-profit network received recognition from the American Stroke Association (ASA) for providing a high level of stroke care and participating in the ASA’s Get With The Guidelines® program. Additionally, 20 hospitals in the Sutter system received recognition from the American Heart Association (AHA) for consistently applying the American College of Cardiology guidelines when treating patients with heart failure, and participating in the AHA’s Get With The Guidelines® program.

Stroke Care

Sutter hospitals including Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness campus in San Francisco, Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, Memorial Medical Center in Modesto, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Tracy Community Hospital, Novato Community Hospital, and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each earned a Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for meeting or exceeded performance-focused quality benchmarks set forth by the American Stroke Association. Memorial Hospital Los Banos and Sutter Roseville Medical Center earned the Silver-Plus Quality Achievement Award and Sutter Solano Medical Center earned Bronze. 

“The care teams in our Brain & Mind service line work closely together, using evidence-based clinical practices, so patients receive high-quality care and exceptional service,” said Bill Isenberg, M.D., chief quality and safety officer for Sutter Health. “Our goal of continuous improvement in the neurosciences helps drive and strengthen our integrated health care network.”

Each of the honored hospitals are designated by The Joint Commission as Primary Stroke Centers and serve as a resource available to patients needing stroke-related services.

Our goal of continuous improvement in the neurosciences helps drive and strengthen our integrated health care network.

Eleven of the Sutter hospitals honored also earned a place in the Stroke Honor Roll —with Sutter Tracy Community Hospital and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each receiving Elite Plus Honor Roll status. To qualify for this recognition, these hospitals met quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat acute ischemic stroke.

Furthermore, this year marks the debut of two new Stroke Honor Rolls, and Sutter hospitals earned a place on each. Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento is among only 11 hospitals in California to be listed on the Advanced Therapy Honor Roll which recognizes participating hospitals that met timeliness targets for the removal of blood clots from the brain under image guidance. This procedure, known as endovascular thrombectomy, is not performed at all hospitals. Additionally, eight Sutter hospitals earned a place on the new Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll, which promotes evidence-based care for patients with this condition.

Cardiology Care

The 2020 Get With The Guidelines® awards also recognizes hospitals that maintain high standards in the treatment of heart failure. Overall, 20 Sutter hospitals demonstrated their commitment to providing the most appropriate cardiac care by following nationally recognized, research-based guidelines to treat heart failure and participating in the Get With The Guidelines® program.

Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center (Oakland and Berkeley campuses), California Pacific Medical Center (Davies, Mission Bernal, and Van Ness campuses), Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, Memorial Hospital Los Banos, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Coast Hospital in Crescent City, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center in Antioch, Sutter Lakeside Hospital in Lakeport, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Sutter Solano Medical Center in Vallejo, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Novato Community Hospital, and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each earned a Get With The Guidelines®- Gold Quality Achievement Award for high quality heart failure care. Sutter Tracy Community Hospital earned Silver and Eden Medical Center earned the Bronze Quality Achievement Award for high quality heart failure care. 

Sutter’s Mills-Peninsula Medical Center also earned recognition for the evidence based care of coronary artery disease, and for meeting or exceeding care recommendations for patients presenting with an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) – a specific kind of heart attack that can be caused by coronary artery disease.

“The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association are pleased to recognize these Sutter hospitals for their commitment to stroke and cardiac care,” said Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., national chairperson of the Quality Oversight Committee and Executive Vice Chair of Neurology, Director of Acute Stroke Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. “Research has shown that hospitals adhering to clinical measures through the Get With The Guidelines® quality improvement initiative can often see fewer readmissions and lower mortality rates.”

Sutter Health proactively implements programs across its integrated network that continuously improve the quality and value of healthcare for patients. Its integration across regions, clinical settings and data environments is delivering care models with some of the best clinical outcomes in the nation. From heart transplants to valve replacements to cardiac ablations, Sutter’s Cardiovascular Health service line practitioners use innovative procedures and treatments to care for patients with a wide variety of specialized heart and vascular needs.

Virtual ‘Topping Out’ Ceremony Caps Sutter Santa Rosa Expansion Milestone

Posted on Jul 30, 2020 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital

SANTA ROSA, Calif. – With a few clicks of a mouse, the community logged on to witness the “topping out” of Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital’s new three-story expansion. The medical facility reached its latest construction milestone on July 30 and marked the occasion with a virtual gathering, where viewers watched as the final structural steel beam was secured into place. Hospital staff; elected officials, including Congressman Mike Thompson and Susan Gorin, chair of the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors; HerreroBOLDT crewmembers; and the public, all tuned in.

Hospital CEO Dan Peterson kicked off the program and acknowledged the unusual online ceremony made necessary by the pandemic. “This is no traditional ‘topping out.’ We’re using technology to keep everyone safe, and we’re making history with one of the country’s first virtual topping out celebrations.”

Watch the full program below.

Healthcare, Always in Demand

The healthcare industry continues to be one of the largest and fastest growing in the U.S. The country’s aging Baby Boomer population, plus the addition of the COVID-19 crisis, has only made healthcare more taxed and in demand than ever.

“Today healthcare is on all our minds as we face the continued threat of coronavirus pandemic. This facility will expand our ability to deliver quality care no matter the crisis we face—a pandemic, wildfires or earthquakes,” said Congressman Thompson. “I can’t wait to celebrate, hopefully in person, when we cut the ribbon to open the space.”

Supervisor Gorin added, “Sutter has been a vital partner to Sonoma County for almost three decades, and this expansion is the embodiment of its continued commitment to the community. This hospital will provide high-quality care to residents in a state-of-the-art, seismically safe and environmentally conscious setting.”

Expansion Will Add Hospital Bed Capacity

Sutter Health has invested $158 million to expand the hospital to increase capacity, adding 40 all-private patient rooms, 13 outpatient care unit beds, an 11-bed post-acute care unit bay, and 21 emergency department bays. The first phase of the three-story tower will add 67,000 square feet of space and is scheduled for completion in spring 2022. It will be followed by a phase II renovation to expand the hospital’s emergency department and support services in fall 2022.

“Today’s ceremony is a celebration of a momentous achievement for our hospital that will help us serve our patients and our community for generations to come. Everyone at Sutter Santa Rosa knows the hard work it’s taken to reach this milestone, and I want to offer a heartfelt ‘thank you’ to our team, which has continually served this community with integrity and compassion,” said Peterson.

Out with The Shovels and in with The Sharpies

Ahead of the event, hospital staff, physicians and construction crewmembers were invited to sign their names on the final beam. Former hospital CEO, Mike Purvis, was even on hand to add his name to history.

“It warms my heart to know that this beam was personally signed by our hospital’s doctors, nurses, staff and construction crew—all important players in our hospital’s future,” said Peterson. “Once the beam is bolted into place, it will signify that we’re ready for the next chapter in our 2022 hospital expansion.”

Construction in the Time of COVID

From first learning of the pandemic, the HerreroBOLDT team made worker safety its number one priority, ensuring proper social distancing and masking.

“Our biggest accomplishment thus far has been that we have not had a single case of COVID-19 spread on our project,” said Tom Guardino, HerreroBOLDT project superintendent. “Our entire team has been committed to early proactive behaviors.”

Crunching the Numbers of Hauling Dirt & Erecting Steel

• During the preparation of the project site, crews hauled off 3,300 yards of dirt—enough to fill 1.5 Olympic-size swimming pools.

• During the foundations phase, teams poured 1,987 yards of concrete. It was delivered in 223 concrete trucks and represents 8 million 47 thousand pounds of concrete.

• Roughly 196 thousand pounds of reinforcing was used to strengthen the building’s foundations. If stretched out in a continuous line, it would span more than 7 miles.

• The expansion consists of 441 tons of structural steel, weighing about 882,000 pounds. To put that into perspective, an average blue whale weighs about 110 tons. That means the building’s steel weighs about four blue whales.

“We are excited about the opportunity to build such an important project in the North Bay. A lot of our construction works are from this area. We’ve enjoyed a long and successful history with Sutter, and we are proud to be part of a project that will give back to the community for years to come,” Guardino said.

About Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital

Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, part of Sutter Health’s not-for-profit integrated network of care, is an 84-bed acute care hospital that offers an extensive array of inpatient and outpatient services. The facility opened in 2014 and has a long, proud history of providing high quality care in Sonoma County and beyond. Because of an unwavering focus on health and healing the hospital is consistently ranked as one of the top hospitals in the region.

Seven Months of Coronavirus. Here’s What We’ve Learned Treating COVID Patients.

Posted on Jul 24, 2020 in California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SAN FRANCISCO – The novel coronavirus has been with us since January 2020—and California is still in a continuation of the first wave. As the pandemic drags on, the medical community has acted as a sponge, absorbing knowledge of how the infection is best treated from each new case.

Vernon Giang, M.D., chief medical executive of California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit integrated network of care, shares four learnings CPMC clinicians have discovered since they began treating some of the nation’s first COVID-19 cases in March.

Constantly Refining the Approach to Treatment

COVID-19 symptoms differ based on the severity of disease. Fever, cough, and shortness of breath are more commonly reported among those who are hospitalized with COVID-19 than among those with milder cases of the disease.

“Early on, the thinking was to put patients with compromised lung function on a ventilator,” said Giang. “We’re managing patients much better now with high-flow oxygen. This is an incredible advance to keep patients surviving COVID-19 without bearing the risks of intubation.”

Additionally, Giang says, “Treatment of COVID patients has become more focused over the last few months because we’ve learned what drugs are effective against the disease.”

For instance, clinicians have learned that hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine isn’t effective against COVID-19. Rather, the anti-viral drug remdesivir is producing much stronger outcomes.

Increased & Faster Testing Means Early I.D. of Positive Patients

CPMC, like all hospitals in the Sutter network, test hospitalized patients for COVID-19, including those preparing for an upcoming surgical procedure.

“Testing is a very important part of controlling the spread of COVID-19. If we can get increased rapid testing down and make it widespread, we can help decrease the community spread of this virus. Testing in a hospital setting is important, too, as it enables staff to separate positive patients away from others, thus reducing exposure,” says Giang.

Sutter hospitals have also adopted cohorting, or grouping together, COVID positive patients on the same floor, which reduces the risk of spread and the need for additional PPE.

Clinical Progression Timeline

Giang shares that there is a strong correlation between patient infection rates and large public gatherings.

“We’re on a four- to six-week cycle,” he said. “People in early June were asking, ‘Why isn’t the death rate and hospitalizations rising?’ but we’ve learned it’s because the infection cycle takes time.”

An example of this timeline is when the country began opening over Memorial Day (May 22-25, 2020).
Giang explains that it took a couple of weeks after the holiday (COVID’s 2 to 14-day incubation period) for individuals to contract the virus and, in some cases, get sick enough that their symptoms required medical attention. In week’s three and four (or more), around mid-to-late June, we began seeing people hospitalized and pass away from the virus in increased numbers because the virus had taken its toll on their bodies.

Additionally, he confirms that patients with chronic diseases or conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer, have a much greater chance of succumbing to COVID-19 because their bodies are already at a physical disadvantage, making it harder to fight off the disease.

Masking Works

According to Giang, we’ve learned there are significant portions of the population, particularly young people, who are asymptomatic or show no COVID-19 symptoms.

“What we’re seeing now is a surge in cases across the U.S. There are a number of reasons for this increase, including folks who are tired of being cooped up and returning to daily activities as if COVID didn’t exists. Some of it is from the fallout of people thinking they’re invincible and like it can’t happen to them.”

He continues, “We know that diligent masking works to help to slow the virus’ spread.”

Since March 2020, all Sutter hospitals, as well as Sutter outpatient and Walk-In Care facilities, have enacted 24-7 masking for all employees and patients. The Sutter network has also restricted visitors in these facilities.

“We’ve been able to effectively keep on top of community spread [within CPMC],” he said. “Now that we’re seeing a patient surge, we need to continue to be prudent about masking and how we connect and carry on about our everyday lives. Social Distancing and cleaning your hands frequently are also important. Things are opening up, but that doesn’t mean this virus is over.”

The Learning Never Stops

CPMC physicians, like those in teams across Sutter network, are constantly refining their approach to care in treating COVID-19 patients.

“A lot of people we’re seeing are recuperating. We’re learning everyday about how to be more effective with our treatment and we’re sending people home.”

Paying it Forward: Alta Bates Summit Virtual Food Drive Raises $13.4K

Posted on Jul 17, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

OAKLAND, Calif. –The outpouring of support from East Bay communities for the staff and physicians of Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center during the pandemic has been humbling. Community members from Oakland and Berkeley have donated cases of personal protective equipment and hot meals for staff, mailed letters of gratitude, and local first-responders even organized a mile-long healthcare hero parade –all demonstrating the community’s support for frontline healthcare workers.

To return the gratitude and give something back to the people who most need it right now, Heidi Voellger, RN, assistant nurse manager for the Alta Bates Summit emergency department in Oakland, organized a virtual food drive for the Alameda County Community Food Bank (ACCFB). Together, thirteen departments at the medical center raised over $13,400 to help provide much-needed food for struggling community members.

“When the COVID-19 emergency took hold, we experienced a 1,000 percent increase in calls to the food bank’s emergency food helpline – more than half were from households that had never reached out for help before,” said Suzan Bateson, executive director of Alameda County Community Food Bank. “Communities impacted hardest by this emergency are in places where we’re already serving. Months into our emergency response effort ACCFB and its Network of Member Agencies continue to respond to unprecedented need and we are bracing for a prolonged response. Our partners will be critical for the duration of this crisis, and beyond, and we’re extremely grateful to Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center for stepping up to nourish neighbors – especially now.” 

“I know the sense of community, family, and comfort that food can provide, and I believe that nourishing the body can also nourish the soul,” says Voellger. “We love this community and have been supported by them for years. Now is the time for us to pay it forward and share a little love!”

How One Infectious Disease Doc is Navigating Day-to-Day Activities Amid COVID-19

Posted on Jul 15, 2020 in Scroll Images, Uncategorized

We’re all learning to live in this new normal as it seems coronavirus might be among us for longer than we’d like. With cities, counties and states approaching their reopening strategies differently, many are confused about which everyday practices are risky or safe. We interviewed Gary Green, M.D., an infectious disease doctor practicing at Sutter Medical Group of the Redwoods, about how he’s approaching ordinary activities like having friends over and getting his hair cut. Here’s what he had to say.

Gary Green, M.D., infectious disease specialist

Q: When and where are you wearing your mask these days?

Dr. Green: A good way to answer this important question is when do I not wear a mask. I have been wearing a regular surgical mask nearly all the time: walking inside or through any work or public building, including the grocery store and gas station. I wear a mask when I am close to any other individuals besides my immediate family, inside or outside. The only instances where I don’t wear a surgical mask is when I am alone in my car or office, or when I am exercising outside alone or distanced from others.

Q: Are you having people over to your home right now? Why or why not?

Dr. Green: We are not having any visitors over to our house right now because state and local physical distancing recommendations are still in place. A few friends and neighbors have dropped by to say hello, but we keep the conversation outside, brief, and all persons are wearing masks. Lots of FaceTime with friends and family.

Q: You’re an avid cyclist. How have you adapted your rides since the virus began?

Dr. Green: I’m wearing a lightweight neck-gaiter that I pull over my nose and mouth when I am close to others. If I’m out riding with one or two friends, we keep greater than 10 feet distance.

Q: You have adult son and teenage daughter. What are you telling them about COVID-19 safety and how to stay healthy?

Dr. Green: Staying healthy and uninfected is very important. We are careful to encourage social distancing and avoiding any crowded or public mixing with our kids’ friends or neighbors.

For the first time, I am grateful for the iPhone and iPad, as they communicate virtually with their friends and rarely get restless or get cabin fever. We do so much more as a family. My son and I might play chess or billiards, and as a family we have been binging many Netflix series and movies. It’s been a delightful and sweet time at the house, and when the kids get cabin fever, we try to do an outdoor event such as a family hike.

Q: How are you managing haircuts these last few months?

Dr. Green: There are a few things I really like to do: get a haircut, mow the yard, and wash my car. I was missing the haircut routine, and for the first two times, my wife cut my hair outside in our garage. She did a great job! Last week, I made an appointment and the stylist and I wore masks the whole time. Even with precautions, there is some risk even in this public setting. Consider asking what precautions your salon or barber shop are taking before you go.

Q: What’s your best guess about when we may have a vaccine?

Dr. Green: There are a lot of variables so we can’t know for sure. According to a June Los Angeles Times article, there are approximately 160 vaccines for COVID-19 in the research pipeline worldwide right now. Between two and four COVID-19 research vaccines in the U.S. are heading into phase 3 trials, the step just before FDA licensing and approval. This is lightning speed for vaccine research and development. The vaccine process often takes years or even decades, it is being compressed into months.

Q: COVID-19 has brought many challenges. Are there any silver linings?

Dr. Green: The amount of collaboration I have seen in the medical and scientific community has been astounding. Out of necessity, we are advancing our technology and our production in diagnostic testing, new treatments, and enforcing prevention strategies. As an infectious disease specialist, I have deepened my working knowledge of immunology to a much greater degree. In all these collaborative community and international efforts, I hope that we are deliberate and certain to share our advances and our fortunes with communities and countries that don’t have the access to medical care like we do.

How a Rural Hospital Treated a COVID-19 Patient 120 Miles Away

Posted on Jul 2, 2020 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Memorial Hospital, Los Banos, Quality, Safety, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

When Sutter Health’s Memorial Hospital Los Banos had a critically ill patient test positive for COVID-19, there wasn’t an ICU room for her. The small community hospital’s four ICU beds are located in the same large room separated by curtains, and this patient needed to be isolated.

A private room was made available, but there was a problem: It was not equipped with the Sutter eICU telehealth system that allows 24/7 critical-care physician coverage from a central hub 120 miles north in Sacramento. But, as part of its preparations for a COVID-19 patient surge, Sutter Health had just deployed a new system that allowed its eICUs to more than double its capabilities. The patient in Los Banos was the first to be cared for using the new system.

Sutter, a national pioneer in electronic ICU (eICU), has for years ensured critically ill patients in both large cities and small towns have 24/7 access to an expert team of doctors specially trained in their care. From central hubs in Sacramento and San Francisco, these doctors monitor patients in ICUs many miles away using live interactive video and remote diagnostic tools to instantly assess critical changes in a patient’s condition and provide expert critical-care physician support and supervision for the hospitalists, specialists and nurses who provide the hands-on care.

Sutter Health has more than 300 ICU patient rooms at 18 hospitals, each one outfitted with interactive video cameras, but in a matter of a month, Sutter designed and deployed specialized units that enable the eICU’s critical-care physicians to care for upward of 1,000 coronavirus patients without having to travel from hospital to hospital and using in-demand PPE. As part of its COVID-19 surge planning, each hospital set aside other patient rooms that don’t have the eICU video technology installed, and Sutter’s eICU team created and deployed 82 iPad stands across its network to bring these specialized critical care teams to those patients, too. Including the patient in Los Banos.

“The challenge was to come up with a plan for our eICU to provide care for a surge in patients across Northern California,” said Dr. Tom Shaughnessy, medical director of Sutter Health Bay Area eICU. “We are now able to meet the need of a patient surge by giving the same comprehensive, quality care whether a patient is in one of our ICU beds or a converted room.”

With the assistance of the eICU team through the mobile units, the patient in Los Banos recovered from the novel coronavirus. Now rural hospitals throughout the Sutter network are prepared for patients who need to be isolated and still have 24/7 critical-care physician coverage, and Sutter’s larger hospitals are prepared for a future patient surge of any type that requires all-hours critical-care coverage.

“We have nurses and physicians providing some of the best bedside care in the country, and the eICU allows us to come in and provide advanced specialized support as they care for patients,” said Dr. Vanessa Walker, medical director of the Sutter Health Valley Area eICU. “This is critical in the care for those suffering from compromised lung function due to a virus such as COVID-19. Now with these additional mobile units, we are well prepared to meet a surge of patients from this current crisis or any other that may come in the future.”

Vanessa Walker, D.O., cares for a patient through the eICU system in Sacramento