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Colorful Art Delights Hospital Staff

Posted on Apr 1, 2020 in People, Scroll Images, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, Uncategorized

Chalk art at Sutter Santa Rosa

SANTA ROSA, Calif. – Chalk it up to neighborly love in the time of coronavirus.

This week, eight Sonoma residents showed their gratitude for frontline workers at Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, part of Sutter Health’s integrated not-for-profit network of care, by creating colorful messages of hope and support.

It all started when community organizer Sarah Clark had an imaginative idea—chalk messages to line the hospital’s walkways and entrance.

It didn’t take her long to mobilize, just a quick text to friends, and off they marched with buckets of rainbow-colored chalk in hand.

“We wanted to do something to show our appreciation to the staff working so hard to keep our community healthy, and chalk art seemed like the perfect way to brighten up a grim situation,” said Clark.

Nate with a volunteer

These mood-boosting creations were hand drawn by the volunteers in the span of an afternoon. Their heartfelt messages included sayings such as “We <3 You and Are Rooting For You,” “Our Heroes Wear Scrubs,” and “Stronger Together.”

Hospital staff were grateful for the thoughtful gesture.

Nathanael ‘Nate’ Blaustone, RN and cardiac lead for the hospital’s Outpatient Care Unit (OCU) said, “I walked out of work today and seeing this was so special. It’s funny how something so simple can strike such a strong chord. It feels like our whole community is reminding us we aren’t alone. Before I knew it, there were smiles all over the hospital talking about the artwork made for us outside.”

The Sonoma community is no stranger to hard and uncertain times. It’s the touching moments like this chalk art display that demonstrate how its residents open their arms and band together in times of crisis.

Volunteer Rawna Heichel said, “Being able to bring a little cheer to those on the frontlines protecting us all is the least we can do.”

Before heading back inside the hospital, Blaustone shared a note of thanks.

“Thank you for showing your love in so many wonderful colors for us to see each and every day. The love is real.”

Our Heroes Wear Scrubs
Chalk artwork
Volunteers
Volunteers at the hospital entrance

Making Conversations Around COVID-19 Kid-Friendly

Posted on Apr 1, 2020 in Safety, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

How can parents/guardians provide reassurance to children when a lot remains unknown? COVID-19 has changed our world in a short amount of time—and perhaps the course of history—but how can parents talk to kids about it now?

Krystle Balduzzi, M.D., pediatrician at Sutter Gould Medical Foundation, suggests that parents/guardians acknowledge that the situation affects adults just like it affects kids. Families are watching the news or absorbing information via social media trying to find the answers that will make each other feel safe. This is where parents and caretakers can model good behavior by sharing emotions in a healthy way and encouraging children to do the same. “In order to help our kids we need to help ourselves first,” she says. “We need to understand the extreme fluid nature of this whole situation.”

Creating a Safe Place to Share

Most kids know about the coronavirus and will have questions. Dr. Balduzzi suggests parents and guardians need to ask and answer questions about COVID-19 in an age-appropriate way. “Saying everything will be fine or ‘don’t worry about it’ won’t cut it,” she says. “Reassure the child that they are safe and that everyone is working together even though we can’t be with others.”

How IS the Family Helping?

Dr. Balduzzi suggests focusing on ways the family is helping the situation: washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, keeping distance between themselves and others, making sidewalk art for neighbors or donating supplies to those in need. Children may also have questions about when they can return to friends or school. Dr. Balduzzi recommends being honest and saying no one knows yet. Rather, encourage children to help think of other ways to stay connected, like virtual visits with friends, teachers or extended family.

Finding a New Norm

Children crave structure, says Dr. Balduzzi, so getting them back into a schedule as much as possible is key. It’s important for parents and caretakers to get older kids’ input on the structure they would like to create for themselves. For those caring for younger ones, charts can help visually signal how they can stay on track. “We are now their teachers, too, and schools run on schedules, so we should considering doing the same,” she says. Dr. Balduzzi recommends keeping things simple at first: wake up, get dressed, school time, craft time, lunch, outdoor time, etc.

Family Bonds

For those in the immediate household, this is a time to stay close and connected. Hug your child, play with them at their age-appropriate level or cuddle on the couch for a movie. Dr. Balduzzi states that this will help kids feel safe. When kids don’t feel safe, they tend to act out. This behavior change can include temper tantrums, new bedwetting or fear of the dark. For older children, this can include more risk-taking behaviors. “We need to create a safe, calm environment so that their growing minds can process what’s going on around them,” she says. Dr. Balduzzi also emphasizes that it is important for parents to acknowledge that they are human and to always forgive themselves if they have a breakdown. “Sometimes we need to get it out in order to move on,” she says. “These are trying times for everyone and the saying ‘we are all in it together’ never held more meaning than it does now.”

COVID-19: Sutter Health Accepting Medical Supply Donations to Help Frontline Staff

Posted on Mar 23, 2020 in Safety, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Like all hospitals and health systems during this unprecedented health emergency, Sutter Health anticipates a shortage of medical supplies, including personal protective equipment (PPE).

“We are pursuing additional avenues to bolster and conserve our supplies, so we can meet critical community need while maintaining patient and frontline staff safety,” says Rishi Sikka, M.D., president of Sutter Health System Enterprises. “Our team is incredibly grateful for the outpouring of support from community members who want to help our frontline staff and integrated network.”

Sutter is asking for business and community donations of the following new items in original packaging to help ensure supplies are safe and medical grade:

• N95 masks
• Powered, air-purifying respirator (PAPR) Hoods
• Surgical masks
• Procedure masks
• Isolation gowns
• Paper masks (with ties or elastic)
• Paper protective gowns
• Protective glasses/goggles
• Industrial face shields (e.g., industrial face shields)
• Painters smocks (impermeable)

To make a donation, please contact your local Sutter affiliate or call 1-844-987-6099. A Sutter Health representative will provide specific guidance on how to make a delivery. For large local donations, we can also send a courier. Our top priority continues to be the health and safety of our patients, providers and communities. Thank you for your generous support.

To obtain a tax deduction for non-cash contribution over $500, donors may be required to submit IRS Form 8283 with their tax returns. The form is available here: https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8283.pdf and includes instructions on how to complete. Additional questions can be directed to giving@sutterhealth.org.

Car Clinics: The Dual Benefit of Drive-Through Care

Posted on Mar 17, 2020 in Carousel, Expanding Access, Innovation, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Quality, Safety, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Power, data cables and sanitation supplies topped Raymond Fellers long list.

No, Fellers wasn’t preparing to isolate during the COVID-19 outbreak—quite the opposite—he was opening the first ever “car clinic” at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s San Carlos Center. One of several across the Sutter network, the car clinic is designed as an in-person option for PAMF patients with serious respiratory symptoms who have already talked to a provider by phone or video visit.

“We’re solving two problems at once,” said Dr. Rob Nordgren, M.D., MBA, MPH and area CEO of PAMF peninsula region. “By keeping potentially contagious people in their car it means that doctors can assess and treat their symptoms, while minimizing exposure to patients who need routine or urgent care inside the medical facility.”

Making use of a covered garage, a procession of patients – each in their personal car – flowed through a series of stations that comprised the clinic. Every station had a laptop connected to Sutter’s electronic health record and the basic medical equipment you’d find in a regular exam room. A portable X-ray machine was even set up outside to help diagnose lung infections.

Arnold Layung, a licensed vocational nurse who usually sterilizes instruments during surgery, brought his sanitation skills to the car clinic.

“The key here, just like in the operating room, is to have one person per job so no steps are missed,” remarked Layung as he disinfected stethoscopes and other equipment after each use. Filling the role of medical technician, Layung was paired with a physician and registered nurse to form a three-person team—each in full gowns, goggles, gloves and masks—who saw patients through their open car window or in a chair just outside their vehicle.

With a background in emergency medicine, Dr. Nathan Bornstein knows the importance of conserving hospital capacity for those with acute illness. “My job out here is to find the people who need to be escalated to a higher level of care, while also helping people manage serious symptoms so they can safely return home,” he said.

Many of the patients who came through the car clinic had existing respiratory conditions, like asthma, which make them prone to serious breathing difficulty if their lungs are put under added strain. For these patients showing symptoms of a virus, Dr. Bornstein ordered a flu test. In accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, Dr. Bornstein also collected samples for COVID-19 testing from symptomatic patients in high-risk groups, such as those with certain pre-existing conditions, epidemiologic or social risk factors.

Dr. Bornstein listened to each patient’s lungs, and if indicated, ordered X-ray or CT scans to detect infection. Finally, Dr. Bornstein reviewed current medications to determine if a dosage change or new prescription would help ease a patient’s symptoms enough to keep them out of the hospital.

Every person had their temperature, respiration rate, heart rate and oxygen saturation checked and each left with a personalized plan for what to do if their symptoms worsened.

PAMF’s San Carlos Center is one location within Sutter Health’s integrated network that supports car clinics. This service is not available in all locations, nor is it open to the general public.

Sutter encourages patients who feel ill to schedule a video visit or call their doctor to receive guidance. If one’s symptoms are mild to moderate, they are encouraged to stay home to rest, get well and prevent exposure to others.

For more information about COVID-19, please visit Sutter Health’s resources page.

Food Safety During COVID-19

Posted on Mar 16, 2020 in Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Tips to keep you safe

Many people are making trips to the grocery store or using food delivery services right now. So how do you know your food is virus-free when it gets to your doorstep?

According to the USDA, “We are not aware of any reports at this time of human illness that suggest COVID-19 can be transmitted by food or food packaging.” However, experts say it’s still important to follow good food hygiene.

Here are simple steps you can take to try and limit your exposure to coronavirus. Many of these tips will sound familiar, but they are good reminders.

Wash your hands
Wash your hands regularly with soap and water. This is one of the best ways to protect yourself and others in your home from the spread of germs. Remember to clean the ‘webs’ between fingers and thumbs. Don’t have access to soap and water? Use hand sanitizers.


Wash your produce
Whether you’re concerned about the coronavirus or not, you should always wash your produce. For hard-skinned produce, scrub skins or peels with a soft-bristled vegetable brush. For other types of produce, including leafy greens, soak in water for 10 to 15 minutes. Plain water is fine. You can also use a little dish soap. However, do not use bleach or chlorine on your fruits and veggies. Still concerned? Try fruits that can be peeled such as bananas, oranges and apples.

Wash nonporous containers
Use dish soap on metal cans, plastic containers and glass jars before putting them away. It’s also a good idea to wash you hands after opening containers and boxes.

Keep your kitchen area clean
Use disinfectants to clean your surfaces such as countertops, your refrigerator door handle, sink handle and cabinet knobs. This will not only kill viruses but also help you avoid food-borne illness from possible cross contamination.


Cook food properly
You can help ensure you’re cooking food at the correct heat, by using a food thermometer. Check the government’s safe cooking temperature chart.

“Eating fresh fruits and vegetables, and other foods rich in antioxidants has consistently been shown to increase overall health, including our immune systems,” says William Isenberg, M.D., Sutter’s chief quality and safety officer. “Staying healthy increases the body’s ability to fight infections. “

By taking a few common-sense precautions, such as frequent hand-washing and washing produce, consumers can continue to reap the health benefits of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Dr. Isenberg’s bottom line advice: “Use serious concern and precaution, but do not panic and give up healthy food that’s good for your mind and body.”

For more food safety tips click here.

Sarah Krevans Honored as Healthcare Leader and Diversity Champion

Posted on Mar 8, 2020 in People, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Sutter Health President and CEO Sarah Krevans was honored as the recipient of National Medical Fellowships’ (NMF) “Leadership in Healthcare Award” at its 2020 Bay Area Champions of Health Awards on March 7, 2020.

In a letter to Krevans, Esther Dyer, NMF President & CEO wrote: “National Medical Fellowships holds these annual awards to support our scholarship programs and to honor those individuals who have made a lasting impact on healthcare and diversity in healthcare, as well as outstanding corporate leaders whose role and influence drives positive change in the business community and the communities they serve. Your visionary work as a healthcare leader and an advocate of advancing all backgrounds in the workplace, makes you a true champion in your field. You are someone our young scholars should emulate as professionals and individuals.”

Following her acceptance of the award, Krevans provided the event’s keynote address where she shared Sutter Health’s journey in diversity and inclusion, advancing health equity, and the importance of partnering with patients and communities to improve access to quality care for the underserved.

Krevans has served as Sutter Health’s president and CEO since 2016. The Northern California not-for-profit integrated health system cares for 3 million patients—or one in every 100 Americans, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Krevans oversees Sutter Health’s 24 hospitals, 60,000 employees, 14,000 clinicians, outpatient services, research facilities, and home health and hospice care.