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Sutter Delivers the Best Mother’s Day Gifts: New Babies

Posted on May 12, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Uncategorized, Women's Services

SACRAMENTO and SAN FRANCISCO — While looking down lovingly at her brand-spanking-new little baby boy, Cody, a tired yet glowingly beautiful Leah Strange of Sacramento pondered how grateful she felt to have given birth on Mother’s Day.

Leah Strange gave birth to baby Cody on Mother’s Day at Sutter Medical Center. Looking at his baby girl is Dad Adam Strange.

“He was overdue,” Leah said, “but I had a feeling he was going to wait it out and make it an extra-special day.”

By Sunday afternoon, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento already made it an extra-special day for 11 women by delivering the best Mother’s Day gift ever – 11 new babies. By the end of the day, it was expected that 15 bundles of joy would be born at what is known by the locals as “Sacramento’s baby hospital,” which has delivered a city worth of babies – nearly 400,000 – in its 95-year history. More than 6,000 babies are born there every year.

Ninety miles west, it was the first Mother’s Day at Sutter CPMC Mission Bernal campus, one of the newest hospitals in Northern California, having replaced the venerable St. Luke’s campus. As extra-special treats, Mission Bernal serenaded new moms with a musical duo from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music to go along with their new, spacious rooms and penthouse views of the City by the Bay.

Janelle McCarthy was born at St. Luke’s, but gave birth to her second daughter, Evelyn, at the new CPMC Mission Bernal hospital campus. With them is Dad Sean McCarthy and their first daughter, Alexandria.

Janelle McCarthy, with her baby, Evelyn, was getting ready to go home, but she and her little family stopped long enough to appreciate the calming classical sounds of the flute-and-guitar duo.

“I am really happy to be at this hospital,” she said. “I was born at St. Luke’s, my first child was born at St. Luke’s, and now my second child was born here at Mission Bernal. They really take care of you here. It’s great.”

In Northern California, more babies are born at Sutter Health hospitals than anywhere else. The CPMC campuses at Mission Bernal and Van Ness deliver half of all babies born in San Francisco, and Mission Bernal is on target for more than 1,000 newborns in its first year. Throughout Northern California, an average of about 85 babies – or almost four kindergarten classes worth – are born at Sutter Health hospitals every single day … and some, like Cody Strange, hold out to be born on Mother’s Day.

“I feel super lucky and fortunate to have the opportunity to carry him and deliver him, and then be healthy and here,” said Leah Strange as she fought back tears. “So, I’m super grateful.”

Charisse Francis and Kalin Green are all smiles with Kalin’s “Mother’s Day gift,” baby Marley-Rose.

Down the hall, though, it sounded more like the Mother’s Day present was for Dad, not Mom.

Charisse Francis of Sacramento looked stunning as she prepared to go home with her third child, a beautiful, little girl named Marley-Rose. Waiting at home are Marley-Rose’s two brothers, who are just 3 and 2 years old.

“I have two boys who really, really love Mom a lot,” said proud papa Kalin Green as he held Marley-Rose. “I understand. I’m a Mama’s boy, and they are too, so I need a Daddy’s girl.” As Charisse laughed, Kalin looked down at his little sweetheart and said, “So this is mine.”

Mills-Peninsula Physician Receives International Achievement Award from American Diabetes Association

Posted on May 1, 2019 in Mills-Peninsula Health Services, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

BURLINGAME, Calif. – Congratulations to David Klonoff, M.D., FACP, FRCP (Edin), Fellow AIMBE, medical director of the Diabetes Research Institute at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, on being the 2019 recipient of the Outstanding Physician Clinician in Diabetes Award from the American Diabetes Association. This is the highest international award for a diabetes clinician and Dr. Klonoff is the first diabetes physician from Northern California to ever receive this award.

“Being a physician at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center (MPMC) has allowed me to meet many amazing physicians, nurses and educators here, and to work on projects that can benefit patients from San Mateo County, the United States and the entire world,” Dr. Klonoff said. “Development of cutting-edge treatments for diabetes, such as the artificial pancreas, new insulins, software for dosing diabetes medications, cybersecurity standards for wearable diabetes devices and new methods for measuring glucose and Hemoglobin A1c, are what we do at MPMC.  I am very happy to be part of the great MPMC staff and to be recognized for my work as a diabetes clinician at MPMC.”

Dr. Klonoff has been a member of the medical staff at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, part of Sutter Health, since 1981.

Dr. Klonoff, along with the seven additional recipients of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2019 National Scientific and Health Care Achievement Awards, will be honored in a special ceremony during the ADA’s 79th Scientific Sessions. More than 11,000 leading physicians, scientists and healthcare professionals from around the world are expected to convene at the Scientific Sessions, making it the world’s largest scientific meeting focused on diabetes research, prevention and care.

“This year’s National Scientific and Health Care Achievement Award recipients are distinguished global leaders in research, clinical care and academic medicine. Collectively, their incredible contributions and research discoveries have informed on important management strategies that helped us decrease the incidence of many serious complications of diabetes, address co-morbidities and improve quality of life for the millions of people living with diabetes,” said William T. Cefalu, M.D., Chief Scientific, Medical and Mission Officer of the ADA.

An endocrinologist specializing in the development and use of diabetes technology, Dr. Klonoff is the author of more than 300 publications and has been a principal investigator on more than 110 clinical trials, including the first randomized controlled multicenter trial of an outpatient artificial pancreas product. He chaired the scientific advisory board for developing the first FDA-approved insulin patch pump and participated in development of the first FDA-approved dedicated diabetes telemedicine system, the first FDA-approved inhaled insulin, and the first three FDA-approved incretin drugs for diabetes.

Dr. Klonoff has served as a civilian medical officer for the U.S. Army’s Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) for biosensors and physiologic monitoring, and chaired the CDC’s initiative, “Sticking with Safety,” for safe blood glucose monitoring to avoid transmitting blood-borne viruses. He also led technical and clinical guideline panels about continuous glucose monitoring for CLSI and the Endocrine Society.

In 2010, Dr. Klonoff received the FDA Director’s Special Citation Award, and in 2012, he was elected as a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. That same year, he also received the 2012 Gold Medal Oration and Distinguished Scientist Award from the Dr. Mohan’s Diabetes Specialties Centre and Madras Diabetes Research Foundation of Chennai, India, which is the world’s largest diabetes clinic. In 2000 Dr. Klonoff founded Mills-Peninsula’s Dorothy L. and James E. Frank Diabetes Research Institute to facilitate development of new devices and drugs for people with diabetes.

Dr. Klonoff is the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, and founder of the Diabetes Technology Meeting, the Digital Diabetes Congress, and the Hospital Diabetes Meeting. As diabetes technology has become ever more connected, Dr. Klonoff has also become involved in advancing security standards for internet-connected medical devices. He is a member of the Healthcare Sector Coordinating Council Joint Cyber Working Group for Medical Devices/Healthcare, and chaired the groups developing the world’s first consensus medical device cybersecurity standards. He is also a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Klonoff is a graduate of UC Berkeley, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in his junior year, and UCSF Medical School, where he was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha in his junior year. His postgraduate training included two years at UCLA Hospital and three years at UCSF Hospitals.

 

Environmental Stewardship: A Year-Round Commitment for Sutter Health

Posted on Apr 30, 2019 in Carousel, Scroll Images, Transformation, Uncategorized

SACRAMENTO, Calif.—In just the last few years, Sutter Health’s Environmental Stewardship committees have made major strides toward minimizing waste, increasing energy efficiency, and creating healthier communities for patients and their families.

Sutter Health Chief Medical Officer Stephen Lockhart, M.D., leads Sutter Health’s Environmental Stewardship program. He says protecting the environment is integral to the not-for-profit integrated network of healthcare organization’s mission.

“Our mission is to care for the communities that we are privileged to serve,” Dr. Lockhart says. “But caring comes in many forms. It’s what I refer to as caring for creation, caring for the environment in which we all live, work and raise our families.”

One of many big Environmental Stewardship initiatives underway for 2019 is the Food Committee’s plan to increase the amount of plant-based food offered in Sutter’s hospital cafeterias.

While the production, transportation and disposing of food—most significantly of meat—accounts for a large percentage of greenhouse gas emissions, plant-based diets and diets low in red meat are associated with significantly less environmental harm.

Kim Buss, M.D., Sutter Health Telephonic Disease Management Program medical director and a member of the Food Committee, says plant-based diets have the added bonus of helping prevent and manage multiple conditions, including heart disease and high blood pressure.

“Improving blood pressure saves lives, and one of the most powerful ways we can improve blood pressure is by changing the food we eat,” Dr. Buss says.

Other big Sutter Environmental Stewardship projects underway for 2019 include:

  • measuring the energy performance of Sutter’s existing buildings, setting targets and working to make existing and new facilities more energy efficient
  • increasing the use of reprocessed surgical supplies, and a sterilization wrap recycling program in hospital operating rooms
  • donating thousands of dollars worth of medical equipment to local charities and international NGOs
  • replacing plastic straws and coffee stirrers with compostable alternatives
  • implementing a new purchasing policy that requires consideration of human health and environmental impact in purchasing decisions

Positive Impact: Nurse-Driven Universal HIV and Hepatitis C Screening in East Bay ERs Prompts Dozens to Receive Treatment

Posted on Apr 30, 2019 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Nurses Week (May 6-12) Marks Two-Year Anniversary of First Patient Diagnosed with HIV Infection through Program

OAKLAND, Calif. — In the U.S., one out of seven people living with HIV don’t know it, and the majority of people living with hepatitis C might be undiagnosed. In Alameda County, HIV[1] and hepatitis C[2] infection rates have not declined significantly over the last 10 years, and a disproportionate amount of people of color are affected by both diseases.

Nurses at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center (ABSMC) in the East Bay, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit, integrated network of care, have found a way to get more people tested and into treatment. A nurse-led, opt-out screening program at ABSMC’s Oakland and Berkeley campus emergency rooms is testing all eligible patients unless they specifically decline.

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Oakland campus, 350 Hawthorne Ave.

“We routinely test people who come to our emergency departments for HIV and hepatitis C virus. They have the option to decline, but the majority of people choose not to opt out,” says Kara Vassily, BSN, R.N., nurse champion for the opt-out testing program at the ABSMC Oakland campus.

More than 12,500 patients have been tested for HIV and hepatitis C (HIV:  13,378; HCV: 12,599) since the ground-breaking program began in May 2017. As a result of the screening effort, 36 people were diagnosed with HIV. Thirty-four of them have been linked to medical care, and 33 are receiving lifelong anti-retroviral therapy (ART).[3] The opt-out screening program also diagnosed 342 people with hepatitis C.  Of these, 108 people have been connected with treatment services and many of them have already started or completed medications that can cure them of this chronic liver disease in just two months.

“Nurses are in a unique position to lead universal screening and testing programs for HIV and hepatitis C in the emergency department,” says Vassily. “Because they spend a significant amount of time with patients, collecting sensitive health history information and providing patient education, they are able to talk with them more in depth about their potential risk factors for transmission of HIV and hepatitis C. It is through these open and honest conversations that the stigma around these two diseases is reduced, universal screening is successful and the overall health of the community is improved.”

“Many of those who test positive for HIV would probably not have known their disease status until they got an opportunistic infection like pneumocystis pneumonia or, in the case of hepatitis C, only after they’d suffered severe liver damage,” says Ryan Anson, a nurse practitioner at East Bay Advanced Care (EBAC) and director of the ED-based testing program.

“An important outcome of our opt-out testing program,” says Anson, “is the significant number of very early (acute) HIV infections we’ve diagnosed. We are detecting HIV infection in people within two to six weeks of their initial exposure to the virus, which means we are able to start them on ART at a very early stage in the disease. And we know from research that the earlier we attack the virus with treatment, the better our patients’ outcomes–and the lower their risk of transmitting HIV.”

The emergency departments were chosen as screening sites because they are often where vulnerable people seek primary care.

Patients newly diagnosed with HIV through the universal screening program, many of them people of color, are now starting ART within 24-72 hours of their diagnosis at ABSMC’s East Bay Advanced Care (EBAC). For more than 31 years, EBAC has provided primary care for low-income people with HIV and AIDS. Beginning ART as soon as possible helps patients to live longer, healthier lives and reduces the risk of HIV transmission to others.

“The opt-out screening program in our emergency departments helps us identify not only who has tested positive for HIV or hepatitis C, but also who needs our specialized services at EBAC. Universal testing is helping us to improve the quality of people’s lives, while it also helps reduce the spread of infection in the community,” says Christopher Hall, M.D. co-medical director of EBAC.

In the Bay Area, only Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Alameda Health System’s Highland Hospital, and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital conduct routine emergency department opt-out testing programs for HIV and hepatitis C.

Based at the Oakland campus of Alta Bates Summit, EBAC (formerly known as East Bay AIDS Center) cares for an average of 1,500 HIV-positive and 500 HIV-negative patients each year and is the only full-time, hospital-based HIV primary care center in Alameda County.  Since 1987, EBAC’s mission is to provide highest-quality, confidential, and nonjudgmental professional treatment and support services to all clients regardless of their income status, insurance or ability to pay.

[1] Alameda County Public Health Department: “HIV in Alameda County 2014-2016” http://www.acphd.org/media/493885/hiv-report-2018.pdf

[2] California Department of Public Health: “Alameda County – Chronic Hepatitis C Cases and Rates of Newly Reported Cases, 2011-2015” https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/CDPH%20Document%20Library/Converted_Alameda_HCV.pdf

[3] Alameda County Public Health Department: “HIV in Alameda County 2014-2016” http://www.acphd.org/media/493885/hiv-report-2018.pdf. In 2016, nearly 5,000 new diagnoses of HIV infection were made in California, 275 in Alameda County.

Sutter Outpatient Surgery Centers Win All Five California Women’s Choice Awards

Posted on Apr 24, 2019 in Expanding Access, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Foundation, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation, Uncategorized, We're Awesome, Women's Services

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The five ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) to earn a 2019 Women’s Choice Award for Best ASC in California are all Sutter Health ASCs:

  • PAMF Surgery Center, San Carlos
  • Sutter Santa Rosa Surgery & Endoscopy Center
  • Stockton Surgery Center
  • Sutter Medical Foundation Surgery & Endoscopy Center (Yuba City)
  • Sutter Elk Grove Surgery Center

“Considering that women make about 80 percent of all healthcare decisions for themselves and their families, this recognition represents a strong and important achievement,” said Sutter Surgery Center Division CEO Terry Glubka. “Congratulations on a job well done!”

About the Women’s Choice Award

The Women’s Choice Award surveys women across the country to gain insight about their most trusted businesses, brands and services. Women’s Choice Award used the most recently publicly available information from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, as well as accreditation information, to select America’s Best Ambulatory Surgical Centers. It also distributed surveys to women to determine which patient satisfaction measures are most important to them.

About Sutter Health’s Ambulatory Surgery Centers

Sutter Health’s network of ASCs provide patients throughout California a safe and convenient option for many procedures, including pain and spine surgery, hernia repair, cataract surgery, and arthroscopic surgery on the knee, shoulder, ankle and wrist. For more information, please visit sutterhealth.org/surgery-center-division.

Robotic Germ Zapper Helps Bring Down Infectious Disease

Posted on Apr 18, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SAN FRANCISCO –A germ-zapping robot called LightStrike from Xenex is used at California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) hospitals to help curb the spread of infectious diseases. This mobile robotic device is used in intensive care units, medical surgery units, operating rooms and in rooms where patients suffering from Clostridioides difficile (also known as C. diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other microorganisms, were discharged. CPMC, part of Sutter Health’s integrated network of care in Northern California, now employs this mobile robotic technology at all campus locations—with a total of seven in operation.

The LightStrike robot emits 67 bright pulses of (UV) light per second that bounce into walls, floors, ceilings and hard-to-clean places where manual cleaning might miss. The UV light is absorbed by and fuses the DNA of microorganisms, causing the cell to break apart and dissolve, deactivating pathogens. A patient room can be disinfected in less than 15 minutes using this system.

The LightStrike robot is not a replacement for manual disinfecting and cleaning by staff. It is another tool used in the hospitals to enhance staffs’ efforts to combat infectious diseases and to create a safer, cleaner environment for patients and their families.

Internal data shows a decline in infectious diseases at CPMC due to an overarching effort associated with training, improved hand hygiene, and diligence in disinfecting patient rooms after discharge — which includes the use of the Xenex technology.

Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Sutter Roseville Medical Center –CPMC’s sister hospitals in the Valley — also use the Xenex germ-zapping robots to assist in their efforts to disinfect rooms. They have also seen similar declines in rates of infectious diseases.