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29-Year-Old CPMC Heart Transplant Patient Heads Home

Posted on Aug 15, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Cardiac, Quality, Scroll Images

L-R Dr. Michael Pham (Cardiologist), Mitch Peterson, and Dr. Brett Sheridan (Surgeon)

SAN FRANCISCO – At an event on Aug 14, 29-year-old Oakland resident, Mitch Peterson was recognized as CPMC’s 500th heart transplant recipient and celebrated for his speedy recovery. (News story here.) Staff and friends wished Mitch well as he prepared to head home after spending a month in the hospital. Mitch said that he is looking forward to stepping out the doors of the hospital, taking a deep breath and start enjoying the simple things that are often taken for granted. He is also looking forward to a walk around Oakland’s Lake Merritt, which is near his home, and enjoying the active lifestyle he was accustomed to before his illness.

Mitch had a relatively quick recovery after receiving a new heart at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital just on Aug 2. Mitch’s heart failure had gone undiagnosed and symptoms came on quickly in early July resulting in him seeking care at Sutter Health. (Listen to comments from Mitch before surgery)

Mitch’s Journey

When 29 year old Oakland resident Mitch Peterson began experiencing shortness of breath and fatigue in early July, symptoms that he thought were the flu, he had no idea what was ahead. As his symptoms got worse, Mitch decided to get checked out at the emergency department at Sutter’s Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley. It was at Eden that he learned his condition was much more serious than the flu.

The emergency department doctor at Eden told Mitch that he had heart complications and that he needed to be transferred to Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center where an elevated level of cardiac expertise was available to assess the extent of his condition. After spending time at Alta Bates Summit’s Oakland campus, where cardiologists applied medical therapies to stabilize his condition, it was clear that Mitch was suffering heart failure, probably due to damage suffered while undergoing chemotherapy in Wyoming for bone cancer years earlier when he was 13. (It was in Wyoming that he also had a cadaver bone transplant—his first transplant).

The doctors at Alta Bates Summit consulted with cardiologists at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC). Together, they determined that unfortunately, therapies such as medication would not address the heart failure Mitch was experiencing. The specialists told Mitch that his condition was life-threatening and required advanced treatment, possibly even a heart transplant. Mitch soon found himself at CPMC, on the heart donation waiting list and facing heart transplant surgery.

On the afternoon of Friday, August 2, the call came. A heart had become available. Late that evening, Mitch received a heart transplant at CPMC. During the operation, surgeons successfully connected the new donated heart, allowing Mitch to begin recovery and return to the active lifestyle that he once enjoyed.

Mitch has recovered remarkably quickly and will be going home from the hospital on Wednesday, August 14. It was only two days after surgery that he was out of bed on his own and moving around his room, a feat that he was unable to accomplish the week before surgery.

The integrated system of care at Sutter Health allowed for seamless escalation of Mitch’s care to address his congestive heart failure. This seamless coordination of medical and support services from one caregiver to another reduces complications in care, guarantees the continuum of quality and reduces the overall total cost of care. In Mitch’s case, the integrated care offered at Sutter Health was also life-saving.

At Just 29 Years Old, Two-Time Transplant Recipient is Going Home with a New Heart

Posted on Aug 13, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Cardiac, Scroll Images

Sutter’s CPMC celebrates major milestone: Mitch Peterson becomes 500th heart transplant recipient

Mitch Peterson before surgery

SAN FRANCISCO – 29-year-old Oakland resident, Mitch Peterson, is on the fast track to recovery after receiving a new heart at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital just 10 days ago. Mitch’s heart failure had gone undiagnosed and symptoms came on quickly in early July resulting in him seeking care at Sutter Health. (Listen to comments from Mitch)

Mitch’s Journey

When 29 year old Oakland resident Mitch Peterson began experiencing shortness of breath and fatigue in early July, symptoms that he thought were the flu, he had no idea what was ahead. As his symptoms got worse, Mitch decided to get checked out at the emergency department at Sutter’s Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley. It was at Eden that he learned his condition was much more serious than the flu.

The emergency department doctor at Eden told Mitch that he had heart complications and that he needed to be transferred to Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center where an elevated level of cardiac expertise was available to assess the extent of his condition. After spending time at Alta Bates Summit’s Oakland campus, where cardiologists applied medical therapies to stabilize his condition, it was clear that Mitch was suffering heart failure, probably due to damage suffered while undergoing chemotherapy in Wyoming for bone cancer years earlier when he was 13. (It was in Wyoming that he also had a cadaver bone transplant—his first transplant).

The doctors at Alta Bates Summit consulted with cardiologists at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC). Together, they determined that unfortunately, therapies such as medication would not address the heart failure Mitch was experiencing. The specialists told Mitch that his condition was life-threatening and required advanced treatment, possibly even a heart transplant. Mitch soon found himself at CPMC, on the heart donation waiting list and facing heart transplant surgery.

On the afternoon of Friday, August 2, the call came. A heart had become available. Late that evening, Mitch received a heart transplant at CPMC. During the operation, surgeons successfully connected the new donated heart, allowing Mitch to begin recovery and return to the active lifestyle that he once enjoyed.

Mitch has recovered remarkably quickly and will be going home from the hospital on Wednesday, August 14. It was only two days after surgery that he was out of bed on his own and moving around his room, a feat that he was unable to accomplish the week before surgery.

The integrated system of care at Sutter Health allowed for seamless escalation of Mitch’s care to address his congestive heart failure. This seamless coordination of medical and support services from one caregiver to another reduces complications in care, guarantees the continuum of quality and reduces the overall total cost of care. In Mitch’s case, the integrated care offered at Sutter Health was also life-saving.

Sutter Health Featured in Article on Key Leadership Qualities

Posted on Aug 9, 2019 in Innovation, Scroll Images, Transformation

Chris Waugh, Chief Innovation Officer for Sutter Health

SACRAMENTO, Calif. –OpenIDEO has published a feature article on its blog focused on the “The Three Qualities Leaders Need in an Uncertain Future.” The article showcases Sutter Health’s integrated network, and efforts coordinated by Chief Innovation Officer Chris Waugh to use creative problem-solving to better serve patients and their families.

Delicious Food at a Hospital? Yes! New Summit Cafe Delights Diners

Posted on Aug 8, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Scroll Images

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s Oakland Campus also launches room service for patients

 

Dianna Bennett, who works at the Carol Ann Read Breast Health Center, was thrilled to have a cookbook signed by celebrity chef Jet Tila.

(OAKLAND, Calif.) – The new Summit Café and kitchen at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s Oakland campus, which opened this week, now offers visitors, staff and physicians food-court style serving stations with a variety of delicious foods and made to order dishes.

During opening week festivities for the Summit Café, celebrity chef and TV personality Jet Tila prepared spicy Korean short rib street tacos and Hawaiian fried rice for a hungry lunchtime crowd. He also signed cookbooks and took selfies with adoring fans. Special chef appearances will be a regular occurrence at the new café.

Room Service for Patients: What they want, when they want it!

The expanded kitchen has made it possible to offer room service to patients at the Oakland campus. Patients select what they want (within their medically-prescribed diet), when they want it from a new restaurant-style menu offering freshly-prepared meals that are delivered within 45 minutes of ordering between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.

The new room service menu is extensive and features vegan and vegetarian options like vegan shepherd’s pie, healthful and tempting dishes such as chili lime chicken and turkey Bolognese pasta, as well as comforting, nourishing classics like chicken noodle or tomato soup. A room service assistant guides patients through the ordering process and helps those with special needs like allergies make appropriate selections.

More fun facts about the new Summit Café:

  • Café accommodates 300 guests in an airy, sunlit-setting
  • More than 100 food options on the new room service menu for patients
  • More than 8,000 square feet of new kitchen space
  • Two steam kettles can make 120 gallons of soup
  • Four walk through refrigerators and one walk through freezer
  • Blast chiller cools a pan of piping hot soup in less than 30 minutes
  • Turbo Chef oven cooks a frozen fish filet in a minute and a half
  • Combi oven can steam and roast at the same time
  • New dishwasher has an air blow dryer like a car wash

 

Reducing Childhood Obesity One Family at a Time

Posted on Aug 7, 2019 in Innovation, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

New Program Aims to Help East Contra Costa County Kids Achieve and Maintain Healthy Weight

 

ANTIOCH, Calif. –Making sure kids eat a balanced diet and maintain a proper weight can be a difficult task. Especially if the child is overweight, obese or a picky eater.

In Contra Costa County the problem is especially acute. Kidsdata.org, a program at the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, compiled data in 2018 by grade level and found that in the county 36.1 percent of fifth graders, 35.7 percent of seventh graders and 33.4 percent of ninth graders are overweight or obese. According to the Centers for Disease Control, overweight or obese children are at high risk of becoming overweight adolescents and adults, placing them at risk of developing chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes later in life. They are also more prone to develop stress, sadness, and low self-esteem.

Richard Singer, M.D., a pediatrician with Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation (SEBMF) based in Brentwood, had become increasingly concerned about the overweight children he sees in his practice and the lack of nutritional counseling services available in eastern Contra Costa County.

So after careful planning, Dr. Singer recently started a pediatric weight management program at outpatient pediatric offices in Antioch and Brentwood. As part of the program, a registered dietician on the staff at Sutter Delta Medical Center sees patients one day a week at an SEBMF care center.

“There is an epidemic of childhood obesity and all of the complications associated with obesity,” Dr. Singer said. “Our community needs resources to help intervene and improve the quality of life of these children. The pediatric dietician will help parents and their children make better food choices as well as providing ongoing support and helping to monitor their progress.”

In June, Elika Vargas, a registered dietitian at Sutter Delta Medical Center, began meeting with parents and their children on Mondays, either in the SEBMF primary care clinic in Antioch or Brentwood. Children from 2 to 18 years of age are referred to her by primary care physicians.

Vargas reviews the child’s medical history and assesses the child’s eating patterns. Her goal is not to put the child on a diet but to guide the child and the parents on how to eat healthy meals. She also asks the parents and child about physical activity, as lack of exercise contributes significantly to being overweight or obese. Follow-up care is important to assess adherence to nutrition recommendations and weight trends.

“The idea is to promote a healthy lifestyle and gradual weight loss, and to teach families about nutrition so they can make these decisions on their own,” Vargas said. “I let them know why they should be eating more whole grains, fruits and vegetables to get the right nutrition.”

Many barriers to healthy eating exist. The availability of convenience and processed foods, larger portion sizes and lack of physical activity are some of the contributors to obesity. Families are busy and eating fast food may be easier than preparing a balanced meal.

It can be difficult to get children to eat fruits and vegetables. Parents have to be willing to be role models by following their own healthy lifestyle with good nutrition and plenty of exercise.

Some of her advice to parents on how to help children adopt a healthy lifestyle includes:

  • Cut out sugary desserts and juices or try fruit-infused water.
  • Avoid processed and convenience foods. Cook meals at home so children are more likely to have enough vegetables and whole grains.
  • Encourage kids to get involved in preparing meals or in helping with grocery shopping.
  • Offer a variety of fruits and vegetables with different colors, flavors and textures.

“With kids you have to offer healthy choices such as fruit and vegetables multiple times,” Vargas said. “It’s persistence and communication.”

 

 

 

 

 

Specially-Designed Hospital Unit Helps Prevent Mental and Physical Decline in Elderly Patients

Posted on Aug 6, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO – Hospitalized elderly people are at risk of developing complications like delirium—which carries the same risk of mortality as a heart attack.

Now a specially-designed Acute Care for the Elderly (ACE) unit, combined with a volunteer-powered Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) at Sutter’s CPMC Mission Bernal Campus hospital, is focused on decreasing incidents of delirium and other complications. ACE unit staff and volunteers are also working to improve these patients’ coordination and mobility, decrease length of hospital stays and reduce readmissions. In addition to better health outcomes, this innovative care helps control costs and fosters affordable, dependable healthcare.

The team behind the Geriatric Accreditation. Sara G Cohen, MS, RN, AGCNS-BC; Wendy Zachary, M.D., Geriatrician; Ritik Chandra, M.D., Emergency Medicine

The hospital, which part of the Sutter’s integrated network of care, recently earned a Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation (GEDA) from the American College of Emergency Physicians. GEDA was developed by leaders in emergency medicine to ensure that our older patients receive well-coordinated, quality care at the appropriate level at every emergency department encounter. Mission Bernal Campus hospital is the first San Francisco hospital to earn the voluntary designation in 2019 –and it is one of only three Northern California hospitals to do so.

“This accreditation strengthens our goal of providing advanced care for older members of our community who are particularly medically vulnerable,” said Wendy Zachary M.D., a geriatrician and the medical director of the Acute Care for the Elderly (ACE) unit—an inpatient unit at Mission Bernal Campus hospital designed exclusively for people over 70. “Older patients often arrive at the emergency department presenting with multiple chronic conditions and symptoms.”

The decision to voluntarily pursue the emergency department accreditation demonstrates the hospital’s commitment to provide the best quality of emergency care to San Francisco’s older patients—a population that is expected to include 30 percent of residents in San Francisco by 2030 according to San Francisco’s Department of Aging and Adult Services.

Dr. Wendy Zachary with 100 year old ACE patient Dorothy Bobbet

“The Emergency Department is one of the most important access points for older patients seeking medical care,” said Dr. Ritik Chandra, medical director of the CPMC Mission Bernal Emergency Department. “At Sutter CPMC we work to ensure that healthcare is readily available to everyone and we tailor our services to best meet the needs of our diverse community, including the special needs of older patients.”

Mission Bernal Campus hospital’s emergency department features specially-designed exam rooms for older patients, including calming colors, non-slip floors, and measures to reduce falls. Up to 90 percent of the patients in the hospital’s ACE Unit are admitted directly from the hospital’s emergency department. Approximately thirty to thirty-four patients per day are cared for in the ACE unit. ACE unit physicians and staff members undergo training that is specific to the needs of older patients.

The ACE unit is a dedicated floor in the hospital, with 34 private rooms and a physical therapy/rehabilitation room. In addition, there is a large activity room where patients can share meal times and engage in music therapy, guided imagery, and other activities that encourage older patients to continue to socialize and move around during their hospital stay.

With the combination of the geriatric accreditation for the emergency department and the ACE unit, CPMC’s Mission Bernal Campus hospital is focused on providing specialized care to address the needs of San Francisco’s older residents.