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Sutter Hospitals Honored for High Quality Stroke and Cardiac Care

Posted on Aug 5, 2020 in Carousel, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Twelve hospitals within Sutter’s not-for-profit network received recognition from the American Stroke Association (ASA) for providing a high level of stroke care and participating in the ASA’s Get With The Guidelines® program. Additionally, 20 hospitals in the Sutter system received recognition from the American Heart Association (AHA) for consistently applying the American College of Cardiology guidelines when treating patients with heart failure, and participating in the AHA’s Get With The Guidelines® program.

Stroke Care

Sutter hospitals including Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness campus in San Francisco, Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, Memorial Medical Center in Modesto, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Tracy Community Hospital, Novato Community Hospital, and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each earned a Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for meeting or exceeded performance-focused quality benchmarks set forth by the American Stroke Association. Memorial Hospital Los Banos and Sutter Roseville Medical Center earned the Silver-Plus Quality Achievement Award and Sutter Solano Medical Center earned Bronze. 

“The care teams in our Brain & Mind service line work closely together, using evidence-based clinical practices, so patients receive high-quality care and exceptional service,” said Bill Isenberg, M.D., chief quality and safety officer for Sutter Health. “Our goal of continuous improvement in the neurosciences helps drive and strengthen our integrated health care network.”

Each of the honored hospitals are designated by The Joint Commission as Primary Stroke Centers and serve as a resource available to patients needing stroke-related services.

Our goal of continuous improvement in the neurosciences helps drive and strengthen our integrated health care network.

Eleven of the Sutter hospitals honored also earned a place in the Stroke Honor Roll —with Sutter Tracy Community Hospital and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each receiving Elite Plus Honor Roll status. To qualify for this recognition, these hospitals met quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat acute ischemic stroke.

Furthermore, this year marks the debut of two new Stroke Honor Rolls, and Sutter hospitals earned a place on each. Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento is among only 11 hospitals in California to be listed on the Advanced Therapy Honor Roll which recognizes participating hospitals that met timeliness targets for the removal of blood clots from the brain under image guidance. This procedure, known as endovascular thrombectomy, is not performed at all hospitals. Additionally, eight Sutter hospitals earned a place on the new Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll, which promotes evidence-based care for patients with this condition.

Cardiology Care

The 2020 Get With The Guidelines® awards also recognizes hospitals that maintain high standards in the treatment of heart failure. Overall, 20 Sutter hospitals demonstrated their commitment to providing the most appropriate cardiac care by following nationally recognized, research-based guidelines to treat heart failure and participating in the Get With The Guidelines® program.

Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center (Oakland and Berkeley campuses), California Pacific Medical Center (Davies, Mission Bernal, and Van Ness campuses), Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, Memorial Hospital Los Banos, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Coast Hospital in Crescent City, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center in Antioch, Sutter Lakeside Hospital in Lakeport, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Sutter Solano Medical Center in Vallejo, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Novato Community Hospital, and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each earned a Get With The Guidelines®- Gold Quality Achievement Award for high quality heart failure care. Sutter Tracy Community Hospital earned Silver and Eden Medical Center earned the Bronze Quality Achievement Award for high quality heart failure care. 

Sutter’s Mills-Peninsula Medical Center also earned recognition for the evidence based care of coronary artery disease, and for meeting or exceeding care recommendations for patients presenting with an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) – a specific kind of heart attack that can be caused by coronary artery disease.

“The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association are pleased to recognize these Sutter hospitals for their commitment to stroke and cardiac care,” said Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., national chairperson of the Quality Oversight Committee and Executive Vice Chair of Neurology, Director of Acute Stroke Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. “Research has shown that hospitals adhering to clinical measures through the Get With The Guidelines® quality improvement initiative can often see fewer readmissions and lower mortality rates.”

Sutter Health proactively implements programs across its integrated network that continuously improve the quality and value of healthcare for patients. Its integration across regions, clinical settings and data environments is delivering care models with some of the best clinical outcomes in the nation. From heart transplants to valve replacements to cardiac ablations, Sutter’s Cardiovascular Health service line practitioners use innovative procedures and treatments to care for patients with a wide variety of specialized heart and vascular needs.

Care Coming into View

Posted on Aug 4, 2020 in Innovation, Scroll Images

Arleen Beviacqua-Enriquez

Arleen Beviacqua-Enriquez noticed two things about her body in the fall of 2019. First, an irregular mole, which the 65-year-old had already developed a trained eye to spot. Its irregular edges told a familiar tale. Moles are a hereditary condition passed down for generations in her family.

The second? A lump in her breast.

Beviacqua-Enriquez set the mole aside in her mind to focus on what she felt in her heart was the more critical issue: the lump. Working with the support of her Palo Alto Medical Foundation primary care doctor, Rebecca Ashe, M.D., Beviacqua-Enriquez went in for a diagnostic mammogram where it was confirmed she had breast cancer in November 2019. Surgery followed in December. The turn of the calendar—and the ushering in of a new year—brought the beginning of chemotherapy in January 2020.

Beviacqua-Enriquez remained focused on her breast cancer treatment for the next several months even as COVID-19 tore through the U.S. While the world grappled with the implications of this global health crisis, she navigated through her own. Despite being immunocompromised—not to mention feeling fatigued and vulnerable—her care team kept her medically necessary treatment on schedule. Once May finally arrived, she could see the finish line to her chemo.

But now that mole. It had started to tell a different story. It grew ugly—jagged, inflamed, painful. It bled.

“I knew I had to get back into the saddle about that dermatology appointment,” she said.

Rajiv Bhatnagar, M.D.

When she first contacted the dermatology office in May, Beviacqua-Enriquez learned the first in-person appointment wasn’t until September. Rajiv Bhatnagar, M.D., a dermatologist with Palo Alto Medical Foundation, suggested a video visit, which could happen as soon as the next day. Video visits have increased at an astonishing rate across Sutter’s not-for-profit integrated network since the outbreak of COVID-19 in California—providing a safe and convenient option for care. She accepted a video visit for the upcoming Monday. While she admits she isn’t the most tech-savvy person, she has familiarity with the format. Beviacqua-Enriquez, who works in sales for the airline industry, often conducts meetings with her colleagues via video.

In preparation for the visit, Dr. Bhatnagar suggested Beviacqua-Enriquez send pictures of her moles. The digital photo upload option was a new feature aiming to enhance the virtual care experience. She took nine photos from various angles, and after a few clicks, the images were securely off through the online patient portal.

“It’s a good feature,” she said.

When Dr. Bhatnagar previewed the images that Sunday before, plans dramatically shifted. He examined the photos and knew immediately that Beviacqua-Enriquez needed treatment. The video visit was cancelled. Instead, Dr. Bhatnagar spoke with a dermatological surgeon and oncologist, and arranged for the patient to come in the next day for an excision of her melanoma.

“Once you get past the shock, you learn to trust,” she said.

“We very rapidly learned how to deploy video and other telemedicine visits across every specialty within Sutter Health’s network, and saw immediately, as in Arleen’s case, how impactful this can be,” said Dr. Bhatnagar. “We’re continuously learning and improving upon how we deliver both traditional and telemedicine care. Access has taken on new meaning, and we know it can only help enhance outcomes and the overall care experience.”

Beviacqua-Enriquez continues her healing journey this summer. The native Northern Californian, along with husband and college-age son, will remain close to home. When the timing is right, they will hit up some of their favorite walks and trails around the peninsula.

Their quality time together is precious and not taken for granted. While Beviacqua-Enriquez’s video visit may have never happened, it opened the door for her to get immediate care she needed—to make these moments with her family a reality.

“These are changing times. Our lives will not be the same as before COVID. It’s changed everyone’s perceptions on many things,” she said. “You have to be open to different techniques and processes. We have to have other options and thank God we have it.”

Wildfire Smoke and COVID-19: What to Know and How to Prepare

Posted on Aug 2, 2020 in California Pacific Medical Center, Safety, Scroll Images, Wellness

SAN FRANCISCO – For people who experienced breathing and respiratory problems brought on by previous years’ wildfire smoke, a San Francisco health expert cautions that these individuals should be extra vigilant with their health while COVID-19 is among us.

In an article by the San Francisco Chronicle, Vinayak Jha, M.D., a pulmonologist affiliated with Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), says that people are already concerned about catching the virus and becoming ill. Having respiratory problems combined with air pollution from wildfires is not an ideal situation.

“There are growing reports out of China, Europe and the U.S. that the more air pollution there is, the more COVID deaths and cases there are,” says Jha. “There’s some reason for concern that wildfire smoke, besides being bad for people in general, may affect people’s susceptibility to getting the virus.”

Jha says breathing in wildfire smoke can cause shortness of breath, coughing and sore throat, and that having the coronavirus may worsen symptoms.

Recovering from COVID-19? Living with a respiratory illness? Here’s what you should do if wildfire smoke becomes a problem.

As the fire seasons heats up, Jha says COVID-19 patients should keep in close contact with their health care provider and avoid exerting themselves, especially if they are at the beginning of the illness.

“Continue to socially distance, and continue to wear a mask in public,” says Jha. He encourages people to have precautions in place now, before the wildfire season hits: know how to check the Air Quality Index, check your own home air purifying system to make sure the filters are clean, and have a plan in case you need to leave the area.

Pulmonary Care

In the Sutter Health network, pulmonary specialists have deep expertise in treating acute and chronic lung conditions, including asthma, bronchiolitis, emphysema and pneumonia. They offer treatment for interstitial lung disease, advanced COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), pulmonary nodules and pulmonary hypertension.

In light of COVID-19, Sutter Bay Medical Foundation stood up respiratory care clinics (RCCs) to prepare for increased patient demand. These exam experiences keep potentially contagious people distanced from those that aren’t, while allowing all who need in-person care to receive it.

Read more about Sutter’s respiratory care clinics here.

Sutter Health is committed to your health and safety. If you need care, make an appointment today. Our care teams are ready to serve you, either in person or by Video Visit.

Learn more about getting care during COVID-19 here.

Virtual ‘Topping Out’ Ceremony Caps Sutter Santa Rosa Expansion Milestone

Posted on Jul 30, 2020 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital

SANTA ROSA, Calif. – With a few clicks of a mouse, the community logged on to witness the “topping out” of Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital’s new three-story expansion. The medical facility reached its latest construction milestone on July 30 and marked the occasion with a virtual gathering, where viewers watched as the final structural steel beam was secured into place. Hospital staff; elected officials, including Congressman Mike Thompson and Susan Gorin, chair of the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors; HerreroBOLDT crewmembers; and the public, all tuned in.

Hospital CEO Dan Peterson kicked off the program and acknowledged the unusual online ceremony made necessary by the pandemic. “This is no traditional ‘topping out.’ We’re using technology to keep everyone safe, and we’re making history with one of the country’s first virtual topping out celebrations.”

Watch the full program below.

Healthcare, Always in Demand

The healthcare industry continues to be one of the largest and fastest growing in the U.S. The country’s aging Baby Boomer population, plus the addition of the COVID-19 crisis, has only made healthcare more taxed and in demand than ever.

“Today healthcare is on all our minds as we face the continued threat of coronavirus pandemic. This facility will expand our ability to deliver quality care no matter the crisis we face—a pandemic, wildfires or earthquakes,” said Congressman Thompson. “I can’t wait to celebrate, hopefully in person, when we cut the ribbon to open the space.”

Supervisor Gorin added, “Sutter has been a vital partner to Sonoma County for almost three decades, and this expansion is the embodiment of its continued commitment to the community. This hospital will provide high-quality care to residents in a state-of-the-art, seismically safe and environmentally conscious setting.”

Expansion Will Add Hospital Bed Capacity

Sutter Health has invested $158 million to expand the hospital to increase capacity, adding 40 all-private patient rooms, 13 outpatient care unit beds, an 11-bed post-acute care unit bay, and 21 emergency department bays. The first phase of the three-story tower will add 67,000 square feet of space and is scheduled for completion in spring 2022. It will be followed by a phase II renovation to expand the hospital’s emergency department and support services in fall 2022.

“Today’s ceremony is a celebration of a momentous achievement for our hospital that will help us serve our patients and our community for generations to come. Everyone at Sutter Santa Rosa knows the hard work it’s taken to reach this milestone, and I want to offer a heartfelt ‘thank you’ to our team, which has continually served this community with integrity and compassion,” said Peterson.

Out with The Shovels and in with The Sharpies

Ahead of the event, hospital staff, physicians and construction crewmembers were invited to sign their names on the final beam. Former hospital CEO, Mike Purvis, was even on hand to add his name to history.

“It warms my heart to know that this beam was personally signed by our hospital’s doctors, nurses, staff and construction crew—all important players in our hospital’s future,” said Peterson. “Once the beam is bolted into place, it will signify that we’re ready for the next chapter in our 2022 hospital expansion.”

Construction in the Time of COVID

From first learning of the pandemic, the HerreroBOLDT team made worker safety its number one priority, ensuring proper social distancing and masking.

“Our biggest accomplishment thus far has been that we have not had a single case of COVID-19 spread on our project,” said Tom Guardino, HerreroBOLDT project superintendent. “Our entire team has been committed to early proactive behaviors.”

Crunching the Numbers of Hauling Dirt & Erecting Steel

• During the preparation of the project site, crews hauled off 3,300 yards of dirt—enough to fill 1.5 Olympic-size swimming pools.

• During the foundations phase, teams poured 1,987 yards of concrete. It was delivered in 223 concrete trucks and represents 8 million 47 thousand pounds of concrete.

• Roughly 196 thousand pounds of reinforcing was used to strengthen the building’s foundations. If stretched out in a continuous line, it would span more than 7 miles.

• The expansion consists of 441 tons of structural steel, weighing about 882,000 pounds. To put that into perspective, an average blue whale weighs about 110 tons. That means the building’s steel weighs about four blue whales.

“We are excited about the opportunity to build such an important project in the North Bay. A lot of our construction works are from this area. We’ve enjoyed a long and successful history with Sutter, and we are proud to be part of a project that will give back to the community for years to come,” Guardino said.

About Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital

Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, part of Sutter Health’s not-for-profit integrated network of care, is an 84-bed acute care hospital that offers an extensive array of inpatient and outpatient services. The facility opened in 2014 and has a long, proud history of providing high quality care in Sonoma County and beyond. Because of an unwavering focus on health and healing the hospital is consistently ranked as one of the top hospitals in the region.

Doctor Warns Delaying Care Is Not Without Risk

Posted on Jul 28, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Scroll Images

OAKLAND, Calif. –A Bay Area physician is warning people that delaying critical or preventive care because of fears of COVID-19 could have detrimental effects on their health.

Junaid Khan, MD
Junaid Khan, MD

In an interview with KPIX 5’s CBSN, Junaid Khan, M.D., a cardiothoracic surgeon and director of cardiovascular services at Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, says some concern about coming to hospitals or care centers during a pandemic is understandable, but delaying care should be balanced against the need to maintain good health.

“What we’re concerned about is some patients are afraid to come to the hospital and delaying care for serious problems such as heart attacks, stroke and even lung cancer,” says Khan. “Putting off care for chest pain or trouble breathing could lead to serious health consequences, like irreversible heart damage.”

Khan says patients should feel reassured because hospitals in the Sutter Health integrated network of care are taking extraordinary measures to help keep patients safe, from increasing the frequency of cleaning and disinfecting spaces, to testing all hospitalized patients, screening employees for signs and symptoms of COVID-19 before each shift, restricting visitors and requiring masks.

Learn more about the precautions Sutter hospitals and care centers are taking to help protect everyone’s health.

Preventive Care is Crucial

But it’s not just emergency care that’s critical, says Khan. “We want patients to get their regular preventive care including cancer screenings, treatment for chronic conditions like asthma, high blood pressure or diabetes, as well as vaccinations. Some parents are putting their kids at risk by skipping vaccinations and that is worrisome —we don’t want a measles outbreak.”

Read more about why preventive care like vaccinations is critical for kids.

People who are concerned about coming in for preventive care should call their doctors’ office or schedule a video visit, says Khan. “Start there,” he says, “then you’ll know if you need to come in for an in-person visit.”

Learn more about getting care during COVID-19 here.

Sutter Hospitals Honored By U.S. News & World Report

Posted on Jul 28, 2020 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Three hospital campuses within Sutter Health’s not-for-profit, integrated network of care achieved recognition today as among the best hospitals in California for 2020-2021 from U.S. News & World Report. The annual rankings rate top hospitals in the state and in major metropolitan regions according to their performance across 26 adult specialties, procedures and conditions.

Sutter hospital campuses ranked among the top 50 in the state include:

California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus* (High-performing in five procedures/conditions and four specialties)
Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento (High-performing in six procedures/conditions and one specialty)
Sutter Roseville Medical Center (High-performing in five procedures/conditions)

Coming just outside of the top 50 were Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus in Oakland and Mills-Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame, both ranking at 51. Both hospitals had high-performing rankings in three procedures/conditions.

Three Sutter hospitals are among the top 10 hospitals in the San Francisco metro area, including Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus, California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus* and Mills-Peninsula Medical Center. Additionally, two Sutter hospitals are among the top 10 hospitals in the Sacramento metro area, including Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Sutter Roseville Medical Center.

Seven additional Sutter hospital campuses earned recognition today as “high performers” in at least one adult specialty, condition or procedure, including:

• Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Alta Bates Campus in Berkeley (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)
• Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus in Oakland (High-performing in three procedures/conditions)
Memorial Medical Center (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)
• Mills-Peninsula Medical Center (High-performing in three procedures/conditions)
Stanislaus Surgical Hospital (High-performing in one procedure/condition)
Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital (High-performing in one procedure/condition)
Sutter Delta Medical Center (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)

“Safety and quality are in our DNA,” said Bill Isenberg, M.D., chief quality and safety officer for Sutter Health. “Recognitions like these honor our network’s doctors, nurses, clinicians and employees who compassionately care for patients and their families across Northern California.”

Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network set out to build a truly integrated system—one that offers comprehensive patient services and quality health programs tailored to the diverse communities it serves. Today, Sutter Health cares for more than 3 million patients throughout its Northern California network of physicians, hospitals, home health providers and other services. Its coordination and focus on standardizing best practices reduce complications in care, lower hospital readmission rates and bring down the total cost of care.

“For more than 30 years, U.S. News & World Report has been helping patients, along with the help of their physicians, identify the Best Hospitals in an array of specialties, procedures and conditions,” said Ben Harder, managing editor and chief of health analysis at U.S. News. “The hospitals that rise to the top of our rankings and ratings have deep medical expertise, and each has built a track record of delivering good outcomes for patients.”

The U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals survey ranked hospitals according to risk-adjusted survival and readmission rates, volume, patient experience, patient safety, quality of nursing care, physician surveys and other care-related indicators.

For more information and complete rankings, visit U.S. News & World Report.

*Many of the services recognized had originally been performed at California Pacific Medical Center – Pacific Campus and are now located at California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus.