Research

Sutter Health Joins Cutting-Edge Study for Early Breast Cancer Detection

Posted on Sep 20, 2017 in Research, Transformation

Under the guidance of Sutter Health Research, several Sutter Health sites across Northern California are participating in a study that is evaluating a new tool for detection of early stage breast cancer.

The multicenter study, called the STRIVE Study, will evaluate a new blood test to be complementary to mammography for early detection of breast cancer. The test is being developed by GRAIL, Inc., and the study is recruiting women at mammography centers across the Sutter Health system and Mayo Clinic.

“The STRIVE Study is unprecedented in its size and scope, and has the potential to improve how we screen for breast cancer in the future,” said Walter “Buzz” Stewart, Ph.D., MPH, Sutter Health’s chief research officer. Read More

Sutter Health Research Projects on Patient-Centered Care Receive National Awards

Posted on Feb 28, 2017 in Research, Uncategorized

 Palo Alto, Calif., (Feb. 13, 2017) – The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) based in Washington, D.C., recently awarded funding to a study at Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute (PAMFRI) on improving communication between patients and primary care doctors, and to a PAMF project aimed at improving preventive care for seniors.

A study led by Ming Tai-Seale, Ph.D., MPH, associate director of PAMFRI, received $5.8 million to assess the effectiveness of three different approaches to enhancing patient-doctor communication in a primary care setting.

“We want to enable patients to have a voice in their care from the beginning,” said Dr. Tai-Seale. “This project encourages patients to be better prepared and to engage in shared decision making so that they will get more out of their visit. And it will help doctors and patients choose the best treatment plan for the patient.’’

Dr. Ming Tai-Seale at a conference held by Health Affairs, a leading policy journal.

Dr. Ming Tai-Seale at a conference held by Health Affairs, a leading policy journal.

An award for $50,000 went to the Guzik Family Center for Geriatrics and Palliative Care at PAMF to advance the Fostering Successful Aging project. Established in 2014, Fostering Successful Aging has received funding from PCORI for three consecutive years. The project’s goal is to engage older people, the medical community, researchers and other stakeholders in studying effective strategies to help seniors maintain their health and independence for as long as possible.

“This work focuses attention on value-based preventive care for seniors by discovering how patients can help contribute meaningfully to improving care for seniors both now and in the future,” said Peter H. Cheng, M.D., founder of the project and leader of geriatric medicine at PAMF’s Guzik Center.

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Sutter Health Joins IBM Watson Health Medical Imaging Collaborative

Posted on Feb 21, 2017 in Quality, Research

Sutter Health has joined the IBM Watson Health medical imaging collaborative to find ways to use the power of the Watson supercomputer to identify and predict the risk of cancer, diabetes, and diseases of the eye, brain and heart for patients.

The collaborative is designed to provide IBM Watson a real-world experience and share real-world findings because hospitals and health systems may employ different imaging machines, operational approaches or medical protocols.

Watson is a cloud-based system that analyzes high volumes of data, understands complex questions in everyday language, and proposes evidence-based answers. Watson continuously learns, gaining knowledge over time, from previous interactions. Read More

Sutter Health receives $1.2 million grant by California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine

Posted on Nov 18, 2016 in Research

Partnership with UCSF researchers will support those living with multiple sclerosis

Walter “Buzz” Stewart, Ph.D., vice president and chief research officer for Sutter Health and MS-SHARE project lead

Walter “Buzz” Stewart, Ph.D., vice president and chief research officer for Sutter Health and MS-SHARE project lead

The not-for-profit Sutter Health network was awarded $1.2 million by the California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine to support patients with multiple sclerosis—and help improve how we target and treat health matters across the entire state.

Sutter Health’s Research & Development team and colleagues from the University of California, San Francisco will jointly develop a software application called MS-SHARE. The neurology practice application will be used to improve the precision of care for multiple sclerosis (MS). Read More

Sutter Health, Validic Lead Pilot Demonstration to Capture, Share and Use Patient-Generated Health Data

Posted on Oct 19, 2016 in Research

Not-for-profit Sutter Health, recognized as an innovator in digital patient engagement, and Validic have begun a pilot demonstration to determine how patient-generated health data can best be delivered to care teams and researchers to improve the care and outcomes. The results of this work will inform federal government policy and help determine how the healthcare industry implements remotely-collected patient health data across the nation.

In health care today, many mobile applications, wearables and clinical in-home devices can collect patient data remotely. These devices help patients live with and manage chronic diseases. However, what is missing is a single, secure pipeline to deliver protected health data into the electronic health record or clinical dashboard so care teams can use the remote information effectively.

“We’re excited that Sutter Health is playing a leading role in a project that we expect to have a profound impact in how care teams use patient-generated health data. Creating a secure, effective pipeline for this data to the electronic health record establishes a connection between patients and clinicians like never before,” said Albert Chan, M.D., vice president and chief of digital patient experience.

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Sutter Health advances cardiovascular service by offering first-of-its-kind fully dissolving heart stent in Bay Area and Sacramento

Posted on Jul 29, 2016 in Quality, Research

Recently approved by FDA, Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold opens clogged arteries to restore blood flow, then gradually dissolves in the body

Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Mills-Peninsula Health Services, both affiliates of Sutter Health, will be among the first in the country to offer patients with coronary artery disease a new treatment option, the Abbott Absorb stent, which literally disappears in the body over time.

Sailesh Shah, M.D., an interventional cardiologist at Sutter Medical Center and David Daniels, M.D., an interventional cardiologist at Mills-Peninsula will implant patients with the world’s first FDA-approved dissolving heart stent.

The Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold is a major advance in the treatment of coronary artery disease, which affects 15 million people in the United States and remains a leading cause of death worldwide despite decades of therapeutic advances.

While stents are traditionally made of metal, Abbott’s Absorb stent is made of a naturally dissolving material, similar to dissolving sutures. Absorb disappears completely[1] in about three years, after it has done its job of keeping a clogged artery open and promoting healing of the treated artery segment. By contrast, metal stents are permanent implants.

“This is the first real game-changer in coronary stents since 2003, when drug-coated metal stents were developed, helping to reduce risk of renarrowing of the arteries,” Dr. Daniels explained. “With dissolving stents you have the best of both worlds: you have the benefit of using a less invasive procedure than open heart surgery, and then the stent disappears, leaving no metal behind to restrict motion of the blood vessels.” Read More