Quality

Seven Sutter Medical Network Organizations Achieve IHA Top Quality Honors

Posted on Jan 17, 2020 in Quality, Scroll Images

SACRAMENTO, Calif. —Integrated Healthcare Association (IHA) has recognized seven Sutter Medical Network (SMN) organizations for reaching a high level of quality care for Medicare Advantage patients in its Align.Measure.Perform program.

Three SMN organizations achieved a 5-star rating for performance across a subset of 13 quality measures during the 2018 reporting year:
Sutter Gould Medical Foundation – Gould Medical Group
Sutter Palo Alto Medical Foundation – Mills-Peninsula Division/Mills-Peninsula Medical Group
Sutter Palo Alto Medical Foundation – Palo Alto Foundation Medical Group

Three other Sutter Medical Network organizations received 4.5-star ratings:
Central Valley Medical Group
Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation – Sutter East Bay Medical Group
Sutter Medical Foundation – Sutter Medical Group
Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation – Sutter Medical Group of the Redwoods

Nearly 200 physician organizations participate in IHA’s Medicare Advantage Measurement Program. IHA is a statewide, multi-stakeholder leadership group that promotes quality improvement, accountability and affordability in healthcare. IHA collects clinical quality data and provides it to the Office of Patient Advocate (OPA) for the Health Care Quality Report Card. OPA considers physician organizations “very good” for achieving 4.5 and 4-star ratings. To learn more, visit the OPA website.

Sutter Health is nationally recognized for its high quality care. The not-for-profit network’s employees and clinicians implement best practices throughout its integrated system, helping Sutter exceed safety standards, improve outcomes and help drive down costs. SMN consists of the Sutter medical foundations, their exclusively contracted medical groups, and contracted independent practice associations. Their collaborative work helps drive these outcomes.

Colorful Baby Keepsake Doubles as Medical Diary

Posted on Jan 8, 2020 in California Pacific Medical Center, Pediatric Care, People, Quality, Scroll Images

“Tiny Victories of Life” beads track critically ill and premature infants’ medical journeys

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – At Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital, Child Life Specialists help parents mark their critically ill or premature newborns’ milestones using colorful beads and charms with the “Tiny Victories of Life” program.

Just ask new mom Amanda Bates about her son Asher’s Tiny Victories strand of beads.

“Each bead that has a figure represents an achievement of that day,” says Bates, while holding a string with nearly 40 beads.

Critically ill and premature babies at CPMC spend their first weeks or months fighting to achieve crucial health markers. Child Life Specialists use the aptly-named “Tiny Victories of Life” program as visual storytelling to document and celebrate each baby’s remarkable journey.

Amanda Bates’ son Asher, who arrived six weeks early, is steadily hitting important milestones that babies in the hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are required to reach before discharge.

The program was started in 2016 by hospital Child Life director, Lori Denault, who modeled it after “Beads of Courage,” a similar national initiative that tracks patient progress using beads. (Sutter Medical Center in Sacramento participates in Beads of Courage.)

Blue beads represent individual days, while special charms represent significant or personally meaningful achievements such as a duck charm for baby’s first bath or a music note each time baby receives music therapy. Asher’s Tiny Victories strand includes a red bead to mark meeting Santa Claus because he spent his first Christmas in the hospital.

The Tiny Victories of Life program encourages parents to forge a strong bond with their newborns—which can be a challenge when a baby is very ill and must remain in the hospital for a long period of time after birth. Beads are added to the strands each week during one-on-one family sessions or at a NICU parent group meeting.

Bates Family
Kyle and Amanda Bates pose with baby Asher at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital.

CPMC Child Life Specialist Shannon Banahan says, “Tiny Victories is a way for parents to look forward to the progress their baby is making. Families can get overwhelmed in thinking about the long and seemingly never-ending days in the NICU. But once they look back on their beads and see how far their baby has come, it feels like there’s an end in sight and makes them hopeful and proud.”

On Asher’s discharge day, he received the final bead in his strand—the butterfly bead, which signifies he’s ready to spread his wings.

“Receiving the butterfly bead is always emotional for parents, both because they are leaving this community of nurses and new parent friends and also because they are finally being able to start this new chapter of life at home with baby,” says Banahan.

An Ounce of Prevention, a Hope for Cure of Cervical Cancer

Posted on Dec 30, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 13,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year, but the disease can be prevented with vaccination and appropriate screening. Read how researchers in our network are discovering new ways to prevent and treat cervical cancer.

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Fourteen Sutter Hospitals Honored for Reducing C-Sections

Posted on Dec 13, 2019 in Pediatric Care, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized, Women's Services

Cal Hospital Compare award recognizes hospitals meeting national goal.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Sutter hospitals, which have among the lowest cesarean section (C-section) rates in California, were recognized today by the California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHS) for reducing cesarean births for first-time moms with low-risk pregnancies. Fourteen hospitals at the not-for-profit health care network were named to the state’s 2019 Maternity Care Honor Roll, nine of which have been recognized on this honor roll for four consecutive years. Dr. Mark Ghaly, Secretary of CHHS, announced the honor roll recognition on behalf of Cal Hospital Compare, a performance reporting initiative informed by representatives from hospitals, purchasers, health plans, and consumer groups. The following Sutter hospitals were named to the 2019 Maternity Care Honor Roll:

  • Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Alta Bates Campus 
  • California Pacific Medical Center – Mission Bernal Campus 
  • Eden Medical Center 
  • Memorial Medical Center 
  • Memorial Hospital Los Banos
  • Mills-Peninsula Medical Center 
  • Sutter Davis Hospital 
  • Sutter Delta Medical Center 
  • Sutter Lakeside Hospital 
  • Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center of Santa Cruz 
  • Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento 
  • Sutter Roseville Medical Center 
  • Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital 
  • Sutter Solano Medical Center

“Improving the quality of patient care in hospitals is critically important,” said CHHS Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly. “These annual measurements through Cal Hospital Compare allow us to acknowledge hospitals doing excellent work.”

When complications arise during pregnancy, C-sections can save the lives of mothers and infants, but some women undergo the surgery for no medical reason, exposing both mother and baby to potentially avoidable risks. To respond to the rise in unnecessary C-sections, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services adopted the Healthy People 2020 target of reducing nationwide C-section rates for low-risk, first-births to 23.9 percent. The Maternity Care Honor Roll acknowledges hospitals that have achieved—and in many cases gone beyond—that goal. The Sutter Health system NTSV C-section Rate for a rolling 12 months ending October 31, 2019 was 20.8 percent, well below the 23.9 national goal.

“Over the last decade, Sutter Health has developed and implemented many programs to improve the care and safety of mothers and babies through pregnancy, labor and delivery,” said Sutter Health Chief Medical Officer Stephen Lockhart, M.D., Ph.D.. “We’ve worked hard to enhance quality and safety at our hospitals to ensure we have among the lowest C-section rates in California, rates which are experienced equitably by mothers of all races and ethnicities—so it’s especially gratifying to receive recognition for leadership in this area.”

Sutter hospitals consistently outperform state and national averages for many measures of quality, and Sutter Health is committed to accurately and transparently sharing quality data with patients. The Sutter Hospital Quality Dashboard allows patients to learn more about the care provided throughout Sutter’s integrated network. In addition, patients are encouraged to talk with their doctors and nurses about any questions or specific outcomes related to their care.

Novato Community Hospital Hip and Knee Replacement Program Honored for Excellence

Posted on Dec 12, 2019 in Affiliates, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa

Joint Commission Awards Highest Certification for Second Time

NOVATO, Calif. — The Total Hip and Total Knee Replacement Program at Novato Community Hospital (NCH), a member of the Sutter Health not-for-profit integrated network of care, recently earned the Joint Commission’s Advanced re-certification for Total Hip and Total Knee Replacement. This is the second time the program has achieved Advanced certification—the highest level offered by the nationally recognized accrediting body—since the program was established.

“This Advanced certification showcases our team’s commitment to excellent patient care and confirms the lengths we go to ensure the best in quality and service for patients every day,” said Shannon Thomas, Novato Community Hospital administrator.

In 2015, NCH spearheaded a community-wide effort to ensure that everyone involved in these surgeries follows a rigorous set of standards. The hospital convened anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, physical therapists and others to reach consensus on how best to manage post-surgery pain, get patients mobile after surgery and support patients at home. The group’s efforts paid off in 2018, when 97 percent of joint replacement patients were discharged from NCH directly to their home (instead of a skilled nursing facility), representing a 35 percent improvement over 2013.

“Our patients come from far and wide, so we had to work hard to ensure that regardless of where they come from, or go home to, they get consistent, high-quality care,” said Jennifer Lehr, director of Orthopedic Services at NCH. “We know that patients often recover faster in their own homes, as opposed to a facility, so we are very proud of this achievement.”

“We want every knee and hip replacement to be a success,” said orthopedic surgeon and program medical director Peter Callander, M.D. “We are always learning and applying what we learn in order to make that happen.”

In addition to improving the quality of care that patients receive, the group also working to make care more efficient. “We’ve developed systems to share information at all points of care, so patients don’t have to answer the same questions multiple times,” said Lehr.

This level of coordination is available even after the surgery and the patient is home thanks to NCH’s dedicated outpatient nurse case manager who helps patients through the entire rehabilitation process.

“The Joint Commission is one of the premier health care quality improvement bodies in the nation,” said Thomas. “This certification is a recognition of the work done by our entire provider community when we focused on improving pain management, quality of life, function, mobility, experience and safety for orthopedic surgery patients – and achieved amazing results. We are committed to sustaining these gains and will do so with the continued leadership of our area orthopedic surgeons.”

The Cancer Treatment Within You

Posted on Nov 20, 2019 in Affiliates, California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, People, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation

How blood, urine and gene mutations may unlock secrets to lung cancer treatment options.

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