Quality

Sutter Hospitals Honored for High Quality Stroke and Cardiac Care

Posted on Aug 5, 2020 in Carousel, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Twelve hospitals within Sutter’s not-for-profit network received recognition from the American Stroke Association (ASA) for providing a high level of stroke care and participating in the ASA’s Get With The Guidelines® program. Additionally, 20 hospitals in the Sutter system received recognition from the American Heart Association (AHA) for consistently applying the American College of Cardiology guidelines when treating patients with heart failure, and participating in the AHA’s Get With The Guidelines® program.

Stroke Care

Sutter hospitals including Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness campus in San Francisco, Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, Memorial Medical Center in Modesto, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Tracy Community Hospital, Novato Community Hospital, and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each earned a Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for meeting or exceeded performance-focused quality benchmarks set forth by the American Stroke Association. Memorial Hospital Los Banos and Sutter Roseville Medical Center earned the Silver-Plus Quality Achievement Award and Sutter Solano Medical Center earned Bronze. 

“The care teams in our Brain & Mind service line work closely together, using evidence-based clinical practices, so patients receive high-quality care and exceptional service,” said Bill Isenberg, M.D., chief quality and safety officer for Sutter Health. “Our goal of continuous improvement in the neurosciences helps drive and strengthen our integrated health care network.”

Each of the honored hospitals are designated by The Joint Commission as Primary Stroke Centers and serve as a resource available to patients needing stroke-related services.

Our goal of continuous improvement in the neurosciences helps drive and strengthen our integrated health care network.

Eleven of the Sutter hospitals honored also earned a place in the Stroke Honor Roll —with Sutter Tracy Community Hospital and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each receiving Elite Plus Honor Roll status. To qualify for this recognition, these hospitals met quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat acute ischemic stroke.

Furthermore, this year marks the debut of two new Stroke Honor Rolls, and Sutter hospitals earned a place on each. Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento is among only 11 hospitals in California to be listed on the Advanced Therapy Honor Roll which recognizes participating hospitals that met timeliness targets for the removal of blood clots from the brain under image guidance. This procedure, known as endovascular thrombectomy, is not performed at all hospitals. Additionally, eight Sutter hospitals earned a place on the new Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll, which promotes evidence-based care for patients with this condition.

Cardiology Care

The 2020 Get With The Guidelines® awards also recognizes hospitals that maintain high standards in the treatment of heart failure. Overall, 20 Sutter hospitals demonstrated their commitment to providing the most appropriate cardiac care by following nationally recognized, research-based guidelines to treat heart failure and participating in the Get With The Guidelines® program.

Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center (Oakland and Berkeley campuses), California Pacific Medical Center (Davies, Mission Bernal, and Van Ness campuses), Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, Memorial Hospital Los Banos, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Coast Hospital in Crescent City, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center in Antioch, Sutter Lakeside Hospital in Lakeport, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Sutter Solano Medical Center in Vallejo, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Novato Community Hospital, and Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital each earned a Get With The Guidelines®- Gold Quality Achievement Award for high quality heart failure care. Sutter Tracy Community Hospital earned Silver and Eden Medical Center earned the Bronze Quality Achievement Award for high quality heart failure care. 

Sutter’s Mills-Peninsula Medical Center also earned recognition for the evidence based care of coronary artery disease, and for meeting or exceeding care recommendations for patients presenting with an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) – a specific kind of heart attack that can be caused by coronary artery disease.

“The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association are pleased to recognize these Sutter hospitals for their commitment to stroke and cardiac care,” said Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., national chairperson of the Quality Oversight Committee and Executive Vice Chair of Neurology, Director of Acute Stroke Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. “Research has shown that hospitals adhering to clinical measures through the Get With The Guidelines® quality improvement initiative can often see fewer readmissions and lower mortality rates.”

Sutter Health proactively implements programs across its integrated network that continuously improve the quality and value of healthcare for patients. Its integration across regions, clinical settings and data environments is delivering care models with some of the best clinical outcomes in the nation. From heart transplants to valve replacements to cardiac ablations, Sutter’s Cardiovascular Health service line practitioners use innovative procedures and treatments to care for patients with a wide variety of specialized heart and vascular needs.

Sutter Hospitals Honored By U.S. News & World Report

Posted on Jul 28, 2020 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Three hospital campuses within Sutter Health’s not-for-profit, integrated network of care achieved recognition today as among the best hospitals in California for 2020-2021 from U.S. News & World Report. The annual rankings rate top hospitals in the state and in major metropolitan regions according to their performance across 26 adult specialties, procedures and conditions.

Sutter hospital campuses ranked among the top 50 in the state include:

California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus* (High-performing in five procedures/conditions and four specialties)
Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento (High-performing in six procedures/conditions and one specialty)
Sutter Roseville Medical Center (High-performing in five procedures/conditions)

Coming just outside of the top 50 were Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus in Oakland and Mills-Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame, both ranking at 51. Both hospitals had high-performing rankings in three procedures/conditions.

Three Sutter hospitals are among the top 10 hospitals in the San Francisco metro area, including Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus, California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus* and Mills-Peninsula Medical Center. Additionally, two Sutter hospitals are among the top 10 hospitals in the Sacramento metro area, including Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Sutter Roseville Medical Center.

Seven additional Sutter hospital campuses earned recognition today as “high performers” in at least one adult specialty, condition or procedure, including:

• Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Alta Bates Campus in Berkeley (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)
• Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus in Oakland (High-performing in three procedures/conditions)
Memorial Medical Center (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)
• Mills-Peninsula Medical Center (High-performing in three procedures/conditions)
Stanislaus Surgical Hospital (High-performing in one procedure/condition)
Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital (High-performing in one procedure/condition)
Sutter Delta Medical Center (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)

“Safety and quality are in our DNA,” said Bill Isenberg, M.D., chief quality and safety officer for Sutter Health. “Recognitions like these honor our network’s doctors, nurses, clinicians and employees who compassionately care for patients and their families across Northern California.”

Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network set out to build a truly integrated system—one that offers comprehensive patient services and quality health programs tailored to the diverse communities it serves. Today, Sutter Health cares for more than 3 million patients throughout its Northern California network of physicians, hospitals, home health providers and other services. Its coordination and focus on standardizing best practices reduce complications in care, lower hospital readmission rates and bring down the total cost of care.

“For more than 30 years, U.S. News & World Report has been helping patients, along with the help of their physicians, identify the Best Hospitals in an array of specialties, procedures and conditions,” said Ben Harder, managing editor and chief of health analysis at U.S. News. “The hospitals that rise to the top of our rankings and ratings have deep medical expertise, and each has built a track record of delivering good outcomes for patients.”

The U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals survey ranked hospitals according to risk-adjusted survival and readmission rates, volume, patient experience, patient safety, quality of nursing care, physician surveys and other care-related indicators.

For more information and complete rankings, visit U.S. News & World Report.

*Many of the services recognized had originally been performed at California Pacific Medical Center – Pacific Campus and are now located at California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus.

How a Rural Hospital Treated a COVID-19 Patient 120 Miles Away

Posted on Jul 2, 2020 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Memorial Hospital, Los Banos, Quality, Safety, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

When Sutter Health’s Memorial Hospital Los Banos had a critically ill patient test positive for COVID-19, there wasn’t an ICU room for her. The small community hospital’s four ICU beds are located in the same large room separated by curtains, and this patient needed to be isolated.

A private room was made available, but there was a problem: It was not equipped with the Sutter eICU telehealth system that allows 24/7 critical-care physician coverage from a central hub 120 miles north in Sacramento. But, as part of its preparations for a COVID-19 patient surge, Sutter Health had just deployed a new system that allowed its eICUs to more than double its capabilities. The patient in Los Banos was the first to be cared for using the new system.

Sutter, a national pioneer in electronic ICU (eICU), has for years ensured critically ill patients in both large cities and small towns have 24/7 access to an expert team of doctors specially trained in their care. From central hubs in Sacramento and San Francisco, these doctors monitor patients in ICUs many miles away using live interactive video and remote diagnostic tools to instantly assess critical changes in a patient’s condition and provide expert critical-care physician support and supervision for the hospitalists, specialists and nurses who provide the hands-on care.

Sutter Health has more than 300 ICU patient rooms at 18 hospitals, each one outfitted with interactive video cameras, but in a matter of a month, Sutter designed and deployed specialized units that enable the eICU’s critical-care physicians to care for upward of 1,000 coronavirus patients without having to travel from hospital to hospital and using in-demand PPE. As part of its COVID-19 surge planning, each hospital set aside other patient rooms that don’t have the eICU video technology installed, and Sutter’s eICU team created and deployed 82 iPad stands across its network to bring these specialized critical care teams to those patients, too. Including the patient in Los Banos.

“The challenge was to come up with a plan for our eICU to provide care for a surge in patients across Northern California,” said Dr. Tom Shaughnessy, medical director of Sutter Health Bay Area eICU. “We are now able to meet the need of a patient surge by giving the same comprehensive, quality care whether a patient is in one of our ICU beds or a converted room.”

With the assistance of the eICU team through the mobile units, the patient in Los Banos recovered from the novel coronavirus. Now rural hospitals throughout the Sutter network are prepared for patients who need to be isolated and still have 24/7 critical-care physician coverage, and Sutter’s larger hospitals are prepared for a future patient surge of any type that requires all-hours critical-care coverage.

“We have nurses and physicians providing some of the best bedside care in the country, and the eICU allows us to come in and provide advanced specialized support as they care for patients,” said Dr. Vanessa Walker, medical director of the Sutter Health Valley Area eICU. “This is critical in the care for those suffering from compromised lung function due to a virus such as COVID-19. Now with these additional mobile units, we are well prepared to meet a surge of patients from this current crisis or any other that may come in the future.”

Vanessa Walker, D.O., cares for a patient through the eICU system in Sacramento

How to Stay Safe with Rising Heat and COVID-19 Cases

Posted on Jun 26, 2020 in Carousel, Pediatric Care, Quality, Safety, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento

Temperatures are rising in Northern California, and so are confirmed cases of COVID-19. How do you keep safe from both? Stay home, says an emergency medicine physician with Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento.

“Our recommendation for the heat is stay inside and exercise intelligently; that’s kind of what we would say about COVID-19. They overlap,” said Arthur Jey, M.D. “Because it’s so hot, we’re not going to want to go out anyway, so it’s a good excuse to stay home with your family.”

With communities opening up and more area residents wanting to take advantage of the great outdoors and other opportunities, Dr. Jey pleads for folks to keep their masks on … or at least handy. Popular activities in the region include walking and hiking, which are great ways to get some fresh air and exercise at the same time. Won’t wearing a mask make you even hotter?

“When you’re outside, walking and hiking, and there’s no one around, you don’t need to wear the mask,” he said. “But you don’t know when you’re going to come close to someone, so keep your mask close by. I am always wearing a mask around my neck or it’s in my pocket. As soon as someone approaches, I put it on. … When there are people around, my mask is on all the time.”

During an interview with the media, Dr. Jey gave some other tips on how to avoid heat-related illnesses, from heat rashes and sunburns to heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Those most susceptible to the heat illnesses include toddlers who can’t communicate that they’re suffering, the very old, and those who have to work in the sun, including farm and construction workers.

What and How Much to Drink

If you are out in the sun, Dr. Jey says the best thing to do is drink a lot of fluids. He recommends good, ol’ plain H2O. Not ice-cold water that can cause cramps, but cooled water. He also recommends sugar-free electrolyte drinks, which are good ways to replenish those essential minerals when working out. Avoid alcoholic beverages along with sodas and sports drinks that contain sugar.

“Make sure you’re smart about what you drink,’ he said. “Alcohol is going to dehydrate you. Really heavy sugared water, like Gatorade, is going to dehydrate you. Electrolyte waters with low or no sugar, fantastic. Water, fantastic.”

He also says it’s not important to count how much fluids to take in, but rather to sip consistently and continually, not a lot at one time. “Everyone asks me how much to drink. Many medical professionals say drink eight to 10 glasses a day. But really, just try to drink well.” He said to take sips at least every half an hour while out in the sun. His counsel: “Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to take a drink.”

He also recommends that those going outside wear light, loose clothing and a hat. “I tend to wear baseball caps a lot, but they aren’t the best choice. The ones that you really want are the wide-brimmed ones, like the fishing hats, that cover the back of your neck. We’ve all been sunburned there before.”

What to Do When You’re Feeling the Heat

“There’s a whole continuum of heat-related diseases,” Dr. Jey says, and they progressively worsen as you’re exposed longer to the hot weather.

1.       Heat rashes, which is a reddening of the skin.

2.       Sunburns, which can be very painful.

3.       Heat exhaustion, when you’re still sweating, but you’re feeling a little woozy or nauseous. Your urine at that point is a darker yellow.

4.       Heat stroke.

“This is when it gets scary,” Dr. Jey says. “You stop sweating and your thinking slows down, and you feel horrible. You look like you’re having a stroke; that’s why it’s called heat stroke. I’ve seen people come in completely confused, acting like they’re almost drunk, that’s when you really get scared. The way you prevent that is that you don’t wait until you’re thirsty to start drinking water.”

He says when heat stroke is happening, the first step is to get out of the heat and let someone know you’re not feeling good. That’s why toddlers who aren’t talking yet are very susceptible to heat illness, because they can’t verbalize how they’re feeling.

Next step: “Get some water in you. Don’t chug it, don’t drink a whole gallon of it. Just sit down in the shade or some air conditioning and sip some water. And, if you don’t get better, then come see us at Sutter.”

Dr. Jey said, even during this pandemic, don’t be afraid to go to the emergency room when you are in a medical emergency, whether it’s heat stroke, a real stroke, or any other kind.

“We get concerned that you push things off too far,” he said. “Our nurses and physicians here work really hard to make sure that we keep you safe. … So if you start feeling problems with temperature, problems with the heat, or for that matter, trouble breathing, come see us. Don’t be scared. We have a separate area for those who we think might have COVID-19. Especially now when we’re starting to have another uprising of it. We’re very cautious of it. But I don’t want that to stop people from coming in when they have other illnesses.”

The Sacramento Bee posted one of Dr. Jey’s interviews on heat illnesses. Click here to watch it, and notice his mask is around his neck for when someone comes close!

A Conversation Guide: COVID-19 Medical Research Terms Defined

Posted on Jun 22, 2020 in Affiliates, Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Innovation, Quality, Research, Safety, Scroll Images

Investigational Treatments
Researchers conduct clinical trials to study investigational or experimental treatments to determine if potential new treatments, such as drugs and medical devices, can safely and effectively prevent or treat disease or other health concerns. Clinical trials of potential new drugs can also provide information on how much of a drug is needed, what benefits and side effects may occur, and how drugs or other interventions impact individuals differently based on age, gender, and race/ethnicity.

Drug and medical device development is most commonly conducted in several phases:
Preclinical tests: Before clinical trials involving humans are conducted, potential treatments are first assessed in preclinical research. Such preclinical research assesses the features of a test or treatment. For example, the research may aim to learn if a device is harmful to humans. Another aim may be to learn more about the chemical composition of a drug. In preclinical studies of vaccines, researchers give the vaccine to animals to see if it produces an immune response.

Phase 0: These studies are the first clinical trials conducted in humans. They aim to learn how a drug is processed in the body and how it affects humans. In these trials, a very small dose of a drug is given to about 10 to 15 people.

Phase 1: These studies assess the safety of a drug or device. This phase of testing, which can take several months to complete, usually includes a small number of healthy study participants (20 to 100 people). Phase 1 studies aim to better understand the effects of the drug or device on humans. For drug studies, this may include how the drug is absorbed, metabolized or excreted in humans, and what side effects may occur as dosing increases. In Phase 1 studies of vaccines, researchers give the vaccine to a small number of people to test safety and dosage, and confirm that it stimulates the immune system.

Phase 2: Phase 2 studies test the effectiveness of a drug or device over several months to two years, and involve up to several hundred patients. Most Phase 2 drug studies are randomized trials where one group of patients receives an experimental drug, while a second “control” group receives a standard treatment or placebo. Often these studies are “blinded,” meaning neither the study participants nor the researchers know who has received the experimental drug or other intervention. With such an approach, comparative information can be generated about the relative safety and effectiveness of the new drug, device or other intervention.

In Phase 2 studies of vaccines, researchers give the proposed vaccine to hundreds of people split into groups to see if the vaccine acts differently among the various groups of study participants. These trials seek to further test the proposed vaccine’s safety and ability to stimulate the immune system.

Phase 3: These studies involve randomized and blind testing in several hundred to several thousand study participants. This large-scale testing, which can last several years, seek to provide the manufacturer of a proposed treatment with a thorough understanding of the effectiveness of the drug or device, as well as the benefits and the possible adverse reactions or side effects. Once Phase 3 is complete, a pharmaceutical company or medical device company may use the data generated and collected from the performance of the Phase 3 study in order to request FDA approval to market the drug or medical device.

In Phase 3 studies of vaccines, researchers give the vaccine to thousands of people and wait to see how many become infected, compared with study volunteers who received a placebo. These trials can determine if the vaccine protects against COVID-19, for example.

Phase 4: These studies, often called Post Marketing Surveillance Trials, are conducted after a drug or device has been approved for consumer use. Pharmaceutical and medical device companies have several objectives at this stage: to compare a treatment with other similar treatments already in the market; monitor the treatment’s long-term effectiveness and impact on a patient’s quality of life, and; to determine the cost-effectiveness of a particular approved treatment relative to other traditional and new therapies.

In Phase 4 studies of vaccines, regulators in each country review the trial results and decide whether or not to approve the vaccine. During a pandemic, a vaccine may receive emergency use authorization before formal approval.

Expanded Access
Sometimes called “compassionate use,” expanded access is a potential route for patients with a serious or life-threatening disease to gain access to an investigational drug or device where there is no comparable, alternative therapy, but the patient’s clinician, in coordination with the pharmaceutical or medical device company, believes that the particular treatment may be beneficial to the patient if applied. Expanded access use of a drug or device is done outside of the clinical trial context, but, as with clinical trials, also involves regulatory and reporting obligations to the FDA.

As of June 2020, expanded access is one pathway advancing the use of convalescent plasma for patients with serious COVID-19, who are not otherwise eligible for or who are unable to participate in clinical trials.

Emergency Use Authorization
An Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) is one way the FDA makes certain medical products (drugs, tests, vaccines) available quickly during a pandemic. The FDA may issue an EUA to provide access to these products when there are no adequate, approved options.

Under an EUA, in an emergency, the FDA provides access to the public based on the best available evidence, without having all the evidence that would normally be needed for full FDA approval. The FDA balances the potential risks and benefits of the medical products based on the data currently available.

EUAs can be revised or revoked by the FDA at any time as the agency continues to evaluate the available data and patient needs during a public health crisis like a pandemic.

“Off-Label” Use of an Approved Drug
After the FDA approves a drug for a certain disease or health condition, doctors may prescribe the drug in clinical care for an use not specifically listed in the approved labeling (i.e., “off-label”) based on the physician’s medical judgment, but recognizing that the FDA has not assessed the safety or effectiveness of such use.

For example, in April 2020 the FDA acknowledged that certain off-label use of the antimalarial drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine had been prescribed by physicians for the treatment of COVID-19. These drugs have been FDA approved for use in treating malaria, but not for widespread use in treating COVID-19 since no formal clinical trials had been previously conducted to examine the efficacy of the drugs for this purpose. The FDA thus did not have data necessary to support an approved use of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine.

“FDA Approved”
The FDA is the national regulatory agency that among its various duties, approves drugs, medical devices, and vaccines based on clinical data and other information showing that the treatment is safe and effective for its intended use and in compliance with federal quality standards. The “stamp of approval” is provided when the FDA determines that the benefits of a drug, device of other medical product outweigh its risks.

Learn more about clinical research and the phases of clinical trials.

It’s Time to Get the Care You’ve Been Waiting For

Posted on Jun 18, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Quality, Safety, Scroll Images, Uncategorized, Wellness, Women's Services

OAKLAND, CALIF. — California is slowly reopening, but like so many unknowns with COVID-19, it’s unclear how long our return to routine will last.

“A surge in virus spread and infected patients could occur this fall or winter,” says Bill Isenberg, M.D., chief quality and safety officer for Sutter Health. “If this happens, and overlaps with the normal flu season, there could be a significant strain on healthcare services.”

With this in mind, medical experts agree that if you had an appointment postponed or canceled due to COVID-19, now is the time to reschedule it.

Norma Lester-Atwood, RTRM, is a mammographer at the Carol Ann Read Breast Health Center at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, so she’s well-versed in the importance of catching breast cancer early. Lester-Atwood is typically right on schedule for her own mammogram, but this spring, shelter-in-place orders delayed her mammogram by two months. As soon as she could, she had the screening procedure and she’s glad she did, because her mammogram and a subsequent biopsy revealed a Stage 0 (non-invasive) tumor in one of her breasts. After a lumpectomy to remove the tumor, Lester-Atwood feels she is well on her way to recovery.

“As a mammographer, I’ve always told my patients that it’s important to come in every year for a mammogram because I’ve seen patients who developed fast-growing tumors between screenings,” says Lester-Atwood. “And now because of my personal experience, I’ve seen the other side of the coin and I have even more reason to encourage patients to get their regularly scheduled mammograms.”

Timing is Everything
As Lester-Atwood’s experience shows, timing is everything when it comes to staying healthy. Getting cancer screenings at the recommended intervals can help spot early signs of abnormal cell division or tumor growth before it turns into advanced cancer.

Public health department-mandated cancellation of elective procedures and many routine appointments earlier this year caused many screenings to be delayed, which may, unfortunately, have serious repercussions for some people.

Because of the importance of cancer screenings to maintaining good health, Sutter-affiliated clinicians track annual completion of mammograms, says Isenberg. “We estimate that of every 200 mammograms, one patient’s is suspicious for breast cancer and needs further attention. Because so far to date 4,000 – 5,000 people have postponed mammograms, that means approximately 20-25 cancers may have gone undiagnosed.”

The 0.5 percent detection rate for mammograms is roughly the same for colon and cervical cancer screening, says Isenberg, so similar undiagnosed cancers are likely for these diseases. “Mammograms and screenings for other cancers such as skin or prostate cancer, as well as preventative care are all important to keep on top of,” he says. “And although we often think of cancer as a disease that people get at a later stage in life, cancer can strike at any age. In fact, some hormone-sensitive cancers grow more rapidly in younger patients, so having regularly scheduled Pap test or mammograms can be lifesaving.”

“Some women don’t realize that mammograms are needed regardless of your family history, because most women with breast cancer have no family history or other identifiable risk factors,” says Harriet B. Borofsky, M.D., medical director of breast imaging with Mills-Peninsula Medical Center in San Mateo, Calif., part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit integrated network of care.

Screening for colorectal, prostate and lung cancers are also vital. “Simply put, screening saves lives,” says Borofsky. “Delayed screenings can postpone detection of cancer, which may translate into needing more intensive treatment and a more difficult path for patients.”

Taking Steps to Protect Patients and Staff
Catching up on care is one of the most important things you can do to protect your health. All Sutter imaging centers have resumed some level of cancer screening services, or are preparing to resume soon, and each has taken steps to protect patients and staff from exposure to viruses. These steps include:

Mandatory Masking – Staff, patients and visitors must wear masks at all times.
Isolation – Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms is isolated from waiting areas, patient rooms, entrances and spaces the general population uses.
Cleaning – Our teams have increased the frequency of cleaning and disinfecting in all spaces.
Screening – Everyone is screened for signs and symptoms of COVID-19 before entering our care.
Contact-Free Check-In – Skip the front desk and check in from your mobile device at some locations through Hello Patient, a new feature on My Health Online.

These protocols apply to all visits to our outpatient care centers, including scheduled office visits, radiology, lab and walk-ins to Urgent Care.

Resources to Help with Health Insurance Disruption

Health insurance coverage can be disrupted by wage or job loss, but there are options that provide access to important cancer screenings, even if you’ve lost your normal source of coverage.

In California, the Every Woman Counts program covers mammograms and cervical cancer screening for women with no or limited insurance who meet other eligibility criteria. To learn more, patients can call 1(800)-511-2300.

Other options include extending employer-based coverage through COBRA and CalCOBRA, shopping for plans and applying for premium assistance through Covered California, or applying for and qualifying for Medi-Cal. Charity care and financial assistance options may also be available. You can learn more about these options by visiting sutterhealth.org/coverage-options.