Quality

Sutter Surgery Centers Honored for Excellence in Ambulatory Surgery

Posted on Sep 13, 2019 in Quality, Scroll Images

(Sacramento, Calif.) The California Ambulatory Surgery Association (CASA) recently honored Sutter Alhambra Surgery Center, Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) Surgery Center Palo Alto and PAMF Surgery Center San Carlos with three of four of its Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC) Excellence Awards. Each year, these awards go to member facilities that actively promote and advocate for ASC excellence.

Pictured, l-r: Terry Glubka, CEO SSCD; Melody States, Executive Director for Foundation ASCs, SSCD; Sandy Keating, Administrator, PAMF Surgery Center San Carlos; Johnny Russell, Director, PAMF Surgery Center Palo Alto; Andrew Kim, SSCD Administrator; Denise Meier, Marketing Specialist; Ernesto Brizuela, Administrator, Sutter Alhambra Surgery Center; Brad Heaton, Executive Director for Joint Venture ASCs, SSCD

“The staff and physicians at these centers provide their patients with quality, compassionate care, each and every day,” says Sutter Surgery Center Division CEO Terry Glubka. “Congratulations to these teams for this well-deserved honor.”

With membership totaling more than 350 ASCs, CASA is a proactive leader in the ambulatory surgery industry, and works to advance communication and education, appropriate legislative and regulatory actions and continue the enhancement of industry excellence to embrace the challenges of the 21st century.

Serving residents throughout California, not-for-profit Sutter Health’s ambulatory surgery centers focus on providing patients a caring, safe and efficient healthcare environment. Click here for more information about Sutter’s ambulatory surgery centers.

Sutter Medical Network Organizations Repeat Elite Honors

Posted on Sep 11, 2019 in Quality, Scroll Images

Six physician organizations affiliated with Sutter Health achieve five stars for sixth consecutive year

SACRAMENTO, Calif.–America’s Physician Groups™ (APG), a national trade association for physician organizations, awarded five stars—its prestigious Elite rating—in its 2019 Standards of Excellence® (SOE) member survey to:

  • Palo Alto Medical Foundation, serving Alameda, Contra Costa, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties
  • Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation, serving Alameda and Contra Costa counties
  • Sutter Gould Medical Foundation, serving Stanislaus, San Joaquin and Merced counties
  • Sutter Medical Foundation, serving Amador, Placer, Nevada, Sacramento, Solano and Yolo counties
  • Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation, serving San Francisco, Marin, Sonoma and Del Norte counties
  • Brown & Toland Physicians – a physician organization that contracts with Sutter Health affiliates to provide patient care – serving Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco and San Mateo counties

Since 2007, APG has administered the voluntary SOE survey to evaluate its member medical groups, health systems and independent practice associations, rating participants in care management practices, information technology, accountability and transparency, patient-centered care and group support of advanced primary care. This year, APG added new metrics to assess organizations’ performance on the social determinants of health, value-based incentives, financial standards and post-hospital discharge follow-up.

“As we strive to lead the transformation of healthcare to achieve the highest levels of accessible, safe, personal, and affordable care, we are proud to receive this recognition for our commitment to delivering the ultimate patient experience,” said Don Wreden, M.D., senior vice president, Patient Experience, for Sutter Health. “Our excellent performance in new survey categories, including value-based incentives and social determinants of health, demonstrates our focus on keeping patients healthy to enhance the well-being of the communities we serve. We are thrilled to honor these exceptional organizations for providing comprehensive, coordinated care to our patients throughout Sutter Health.”

The association posts member ratings on its website to help consumers evaluate the organizations’ technical quality, patient experience and affordability. This year 122 association member organizations nationwide took part in the survey.

America’s Physician Groups began as the Physician Groups Council in 1995 and later was renamed the California Association of Physician Groups, or CAPG. To reflect the growth of its national membership, the association was renamed America’s Physician Groups, or APG, in January.

Each Elite honoree in the 2019 Standards of Excellence member survey will receive a plaque at the APG Colloquium 2019 in Washington, D.C., in November.

For complete nationwide survey results and additional information, visit the APG website.

Thinking of Vaping? Think Again! Surgeon Warns of Vaping Health Dangers

Posted on Sep 7, 2019 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Community Benefit, Quality, Scroll Images

OAKLAND, Calif. — Alta Bates Summit Medical Center director of Cardiovascular Services, Junaid Khan, M.D., is featured in Business Insider, ABC7 and  KTVU Fox 2 stories about the terrible health risks physicians are seeing in patients, especially young people and older people with underlying health conditions such as asthma, who vape. Alta Bates Summit is part of the not-for-profit Sutter Health integrated network of care.

Dr. Khan cites the alarming increase in the pace at which vaping-related illnesses and deaths are now being reported as he warns that vaping has become a public health crisis. He emphasizes that vaping can cause permanent, lifelong lung damage and that vaping is equally bad, if not worse, than smoking.

When Only the Best Will Do: Two Sutter Hospitals Earn Highest Quality Honor for Heart Bypass Surgery

Posted on Sep 5, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center and Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento are two of only four in state to earn three-star rating

 

OAKLAND, Calif. –Two members of the not-for-profit Sutter Health network, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland and Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento (SMCS) have earned the distinguished three-star rating from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) for patient care and outcomes in isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures—the most commonly performed open-heart surgery. The three-star rating, which denotes the highest category of quality, places Alta Bates Summit and SMCS among the elite programs for heart bypass surgery in the United States and Canada. Only four hospitals in California achieved a three star rating in CABG for 2018.

Junaid Khan, MD

Junaid Khan, MD, director of Cardiovascular Services for Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

This is the second time in three years Alta Bates Summit has achieved the three star rating.

“The three star rating is a testament to the expertise of our surgeons and the commitment of our physicians and staff to provide the highest quality and excellence to our patients,” says Junaid Khan, MD, director of Cardiovascular Services for Alta Bates Summit Medical Center.

The STS star rating system is one of the most sophisticated and highly regarded overall measures of quality in health care, rating the benchmarked outcomes of cardiothoracic surgery programs across the United States and Canada. The star rating is calculated using a combination of quality measures for specific procedures performed by an STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database participant.

Historically, about 6–10 percent of participants receive the three-star rating for isolated CABG surgery. The latest analysis of data for CABG surgery covers a 1-year period, from January 2018 to December 2018.

“Participation in the Database and public reporting demonstrates a commitment to quality improvement in health care delivery and helps provide patients and their families with meaningful information to help them make informed decisions about health care,” said David M. Shahian, MD, chair of the STS Task Force on Quality Measurement.

CABG is a surgical procedure in which one or more blocked coronary arteries are bypassed by a blood vessel graft to restore normal blood flow to the heart in people with coronary artery disease (narrowing of the coronary arteries due to fatty deposits) or angina (pain or discomfort in the chest due to narrowed arteries.) CABG reduces chest pain and risk of death from heart attack. Isolated CABG means that only a CABG surgery is performed on the patient without any other procedure.

Research at Sutter Health Brings New Hope to People with Cardiovascular Diseases

Posted on Sep 3, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Innovation, People, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Foundation, Sutter North Medical Group, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO – New discoveries in cardiovascular diseases can arise in a heartbeat, and few researchers across Sutter Health know this better than David Roberts, MD, FACC, FSCAI, Medical Director of Cardiovascular Services (Valley Region) at Sutter Health. Dr. Roberts’ 25-year career at Sutter parallels the leading-edge advances in cardiovascular diseases care and research aimed at treating patients with illnesses such as hypertension (high blood pressure), heart valve diseases, heart failure, myocardial infarction (heart attack), and coronary artery disease.

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Girl Scout Fieldtrip Inspires Life Devoted to Caring for Seniors

Posted on Aug 30, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Transformation, Uncategorized

Dr. Wendy Zachary with 100 year old ACE patient Dorothy Bobbet

SAN FRANCISCO –Years ago, a Girl Scout Brownie troop visited patients in a nursing home in South Carolina. One of those little girls was especially impressed by the setting and enjoyed trying to engage with the patients, many whom likely suffered from dementia. Fast-forward to the present. The little girl who spent an afternoon visiting nursing home patients has dedicated her career to ensuring the special needs of older patients are carefully considered.

Wendy Zachary, M.D., is now a geriatrician and medical director of the Acute Care for the Elderly (ACE) unit at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center, Mission Bernal Campus hospital in San Francisco. The need for specialized care for older patients is urgent and growing larger, according to Dr. Zachary. “One of our greatest needs in medicine today is having enough physicians and nurses to care for our aging population,” she says.

Figures from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services illustrate the size of the problem. In 2016, 49.2 million Americans (1 in 7) were 65 years and older. By 2020, there will be 56.4 million Americans over 65, with the fastest growing population being those aged 85 years and older.

Specialized Care for Older Patients Begins in the ER

The ACE unit at Mission Bernal, one of only six such units in California, was designed with the specific needs of older patients in mind. However, special care to address older patients’ needs actually begins at the point where the majority of ACE unit patients enter CPMC’s Mission Bernal Campus hospital—the emergency department.

The team behind the Geriatric Accreditation. Sara Cohen, MS, RN, AGCNS-BC; Wendy Zachary, M.D., Geriatrician; Ritik Chandra, M.D., Emergency Medicine

Mission Bernal’s emergency department is the first in San Francisco to be geriatric accredited by the American College of Emergency Physicians. This accreditation is awarded to emergency departments that are set up to specifically care for older patients who may have cognitive deficits. Mission Bernal’s emergency department staff are trained to ensure that older patients are directed to the appropriate setting for their specific needs, whether they would benefit most from services provided in an outpatient setting or whether they would be best cared-for in the ACE unit.

Programs Enhance Patient Experience, Reduce Cost of Care

“You wouldn’t want your 8-year-old child to stay on a general medicine floor, you would want them to stay on a pediatrics floor,” said Dr. Zachary. “The same idea applies to older patients who have more chronic medical conditions, sensory deficits, cognitive impairment and may have need for special considerations in regards to medications. This individually-tailored care is what our physicians, staff and Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) volunteers provide to our ACE unit patients.”

At CPMC’s Mission Bernal hospital, ACE unit patients receive tailored support through the HELP program, a comprehensive patient-centered program aimed at decreasing delirium in older hospitalized adults, thereby preserving mental and physical function. Decreasing delirium is important because it carries the same risk of mortality as a heart attack. Mission Bernal’s ACE unit is the only one in California to fully address all six key risk factors for delirium:  hearing impairment, visual impairment, cognitive impairment, functional impairment, having difficulty sleeping and kidney failure due to dehydration.

The cornerstone of the HELP program is deprescribing, which is the planned and supervised process of dose reduction or stopping of medication that might be causing harm, or no longer be of benefit. This starts with normalizing sleep/wake cycles to reduce the risk of delirium in patients. To address sleep/wake cycles, the ACE unit enlists specially trained volunteers to help staff gain insights to motivations that will help mobilize a patient to keep them awake and engaged during the day so that they sleep better at night.  With a better night’s sleep physicians can reduce or eliminate sleep aids and other medications, a step that is shown to lead to fewer complications, fewer falls and a reduced length of stay.

Combined, CPMC Mission Bernal’s HELP program and ACE unit have achieved notable success in the year since the hospital opened in August 2018. So far, length of stay for ACE patients our length of stay is 1.3 days less and our readmission rate is 3% less than standard of care for the older population on non ACE units. With lower length of stay and readmissions, CPMC is safely cutting the cost of care for these fragile patients by over $1 million per year.

By the Numbers

  • The average age of a patient in the ACE unit is 86.
  • Patients age 70 and older can be admitted to the unit for care.
  • The oldest patient to be at the ACE unit was 112 and on the day of discharge this patient walked out of the hospital on their own.
  • More than five percent of patient who are cared for at the ACE unit are 95 year of age or older.