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Colorful Art Delights Hospital Staff

Posted on Apr 1, 2020 in People, Scroll Images, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, Uncategorized

Chalk art at Sutter Santa Rosa

SANTA ROSA, Calif. – Chalk it up to neighborly love in the time of coronavirus.

This week, eight Sonoma residents showed their gratitude for frontline workers at Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, part of Sutter Health’s integrated not-for-profit network of care, by creating colorful messages of hope and support.

It all started when community organizer Sarah Clark had an imaginative idea—chalk messages to line the hospital’s walkways and entrance.

It didn’t take her long to mobilize, just a quick text to friends, and off they marched with buckets of rainbow-colored chalk in hand.

“We wanted to do something to show our appreciation to the staff working so hard to keep our community healthy, and chalk art seemed like the perfect way to brighten up a grim situation,” said Clark.

Nate with a volunteer

These mood-boosting creations were hand drawn by the volunteers in the span of an afternoon. Their heartfelt messages included sayings such as “We <3 You and Are Rooting For You,” “Our Heroes Wear Scrubs,” and “Stronger Together.”

Hospital staff were grateful for the thoughtful gesture.

Nathanael ‘Nate’ Blaustone, RN and cardiac lead for the hospital’s Outpatient Care Unit (OCU) said, “I walked out of work today and seeing this was so special. It’s funny how something so simple can strike such a strong chord. It feels like our whole community is reminding us we aren’t alone. Before I knew it, there were smiles all over the hospital talking about the artwork made for us outside.”

The Sonoma community is no stranger to hard and uncertain times. It’s the touching moments like this chalk art display that demonstrate how its residents open their arms and band together in times of crisis.

Volunteer Rawna Heichel said, “Being able to bring a little cheer to those on the frontlines protecting us all is the least we can do.”

Before heading back inside the hospital, Blaustone shared a note of thanks.

“Thank you for showing your love in so many wonderful colors for us to see each and every day. The love is real.”

Our Heroes Wear Scrubs
Chalk artwork
Volunteers
Volunteers at the hospital entrance

‘Rockin’ It: Art Helps Cancer Patient Find Healing and Purpose

Posted on Mar 17, 2020 in Affiliates, California Pacific Medical Center, People, Wellness

SAN FRANCISCO – “Life is tough, but so are you.”

This powerful message is hand painted onto a smooth, palm-sized stone that rests at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center’s Van Ness Campus kindness rock garden in San Francisco.

But it won’t be there for long.

Someone who needs it will pick it up and take it with them.

That’s the idea behind the hospital’s rock garden, located on the facility’s fifth floor terrace. Here, stones with inspiring messages and colorful scenes are on constant rotation as patients, staff and visitors are encouraged to “take one, share one, leave one.”

This simple yet meaningful concept struck a chord with Cameron Yee, a nursing student who found herself at CPMC, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network of care, when her cancer returned.

Cameron Yee visits CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital’s Rock Kindness Garden.

Yee was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare type of cancer that forms in the body’s soft tissue, at 18. She went into remission in 2016 and began feeling the cancer’s symptoms again in October 2019.

Yee was admitted to CPMC in late 2019 due to a complication from her chemotherapy and radiation. Her oncologist suggested a visit by the medical center’s expressive arts therapist, Jane Siegel.

Siegel introduced Yee to painting rocks as a form of mindfulness, self-care and an outlet to distract her from pain. It was the perfect non-medicinal prescription for Yee’s creative mind.

A “You’ve Got This” kindness rock was the first she took from CPMC’s garden.

“This rock kept me grounded and hopeful. It was one of the things that gave me strength and motivation to keep on going. I am forever grateful for the person who painted this rock,” said Yee.

Yee has taken to painting rocks like Monet took to painting watercolors. She was hooked—and more importantly, uplifted.

Yee paints concentric hearts onto a heart-shaped stone.

“Cameron is our rock star of rock art,” laughs Jane Siegel. “Art therapy is an outlet that offers true health benefits and stress relief for patients and staff alike. It’s deeply rewarding as well as healing.”

Now, months later, Yee has started an effort called ‘Rock Kindness’ to help populate CPMC’s rock garden and grow the rock kindness community at large.

Each month, Yee drops off a new series of rocks. Some of her themes have included “You’ve got this” and “Nobody fights alone.”

She has also started an Instagram page, @rock.kindness, where followers can learn about journey and see her latest designs and motivational messages.

At 21, Yee’s in her final semester of nursing school at Dominican University of California and shadowing a nursing preceptor at CPMC.

“I hope to become a pediatric nurse or specialize in something where you can see more chronic patients,” she says.

Yee keeps her “You’ve Got This” rock on her nightstand, where it serves as a reminder of a moment when the exact message she needed, was delivered to her at the exact right time.

Yee knows that no matter what curve ball life throws her way, SHE’S GOT THIS!

An Endgame for Epilepsy

Posted on Mar 13, 2020 in California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Neuroscience, People, Quality

One man’s struggle with seizures is silenced thanks to a medical device implanted on his brain.

Reno, Nev. — Andy Fiannaca, a college student at the time, first discovered he had epilepsy when he woke up in an ambulance. His head was gouged and bleeding—the result of falling during an intense epileptic seizure. Even with no family history of epilepsy, Fiannaca would soon learn that is exactly what he had.

For years, severe daily seizures affected his quality of life, limiting his activities. He experienced speech problems, such as difficulty finding and forming words, and would often lose the ability to comprehend what people around him were saying, known as aphasia. Everything became a foreign language.

Andy Fiannaca displays his post-surgery scar from where his RNS device was implanted.
Andy Fiannaca’s surgery scar is on full display where his RNS device was implanted.

Fiannaca also suffered from the “Alice in Wonderland” syndrome. During episodes, his visual perception would become drastically distorted. He was either an ant looking up at giants, or a giant looking down at ants. Driving a car was out of the question, and continuing his studies at the University of Nevada, Reno became increasingly difficult.

To control his seizures, Fiannaca tried six different medications and then a surgery in which a series of shallow cuts were made in his brain tissue. The goal was to remove the part of the brain where his seizures originated. Unfortunately, his Reno surgeons found the source was too close to his speech center. His symptoms improved after the surgery, but within two years they returned.

Clearly, Fiannaca required more advanced help. But since he lives in Sparks, Nevada (outside Reno), where this level of advanced neurology is not available, his care team finally referred him to California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) in San Francisco, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network of care.

At CPMC, neurologists David King-Stephens, MD and Peter Weber, MD, recommended the RNS System, an implanted device designed to continuously monitor brain activity, detect abnormal patterns and intervene to stop seizures before clinical symptoms appear. It is the first and only medical device that can monitor and respond to brain activity. This treatment, Fiannaca says, ultimately changed the course of his life.

The Fiannaca Family
The Fiannaca Family.

Since Fiannaca had the RNS device implanted six years ago, his seizures have radically reduced. He hasn’t had a grand mal seizure in two years, and he’s finally able to drive a car again. His wife Sara has been by his side through it all. The couple worried for a long time that epilepsy would prevent them from starting a family, but with his condition now under control, Fiannaca and Sara welcomed their first child 18 months ago.

Epilepsy is a widespread condition characterized by recurrent seizures that often causes a severe impact on a person’s quality of life. It affects as many as one in 26 adults in the U.S., and in 50 percent of epilepsy cases, the cause is unknown.

Epilepsy Awareness Day is March 26, 2020.

Sarah Krevans Honored as Healthcare Leader and Diversity Champion

Posted on Mar 8, 2020 in People, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Sutter Health President and CEO Sarah Krevans was honored as the recipient of National Medical Fellowships’ (NMF) “Leadership in Healthcare Award” at its 2020 Bay Area Champions of Health Awards on March 7, 2020.

In a letter to Krevans, Esther Dyer, NMF President & CEO wrote: “National Medical Fellowships holds these annual awards to support our scholarship programs and to honor those individuals who have made a lasting impact on healthcare and diversity in healthcare, as well as outstanding corporate leaders whose role and influence drives positive change in the business community and the communities they serve. Your visionary work as a healthcare leader and an advocate of advancing all backgrounds in the workplace, makes you a true champion in your field. You are someone our young scholars should emulate as professionals and individuals.”

Following her acceptance of the award, Krevans provided the event’s keynote address where she shared Sutter Health’s journey in diversity and inclusion, advancing health equity, and the importance of partnering with patients and communities to improve access to quality care for the underserved.

Krevans has served as Sutter Health’s president and CEO since 2016. The Northern California not-for-profit integrated health system cares for 3 million patients—or one in every 100 Americans, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Krevans oversees Sutter Health’s 24 hospitals, 60,000 employees, 14,000 clinicians, outpatient services, research facilities, and home health and hospice care.

Sutter Lakeside Hospital Welcomes Scott Knight as Chief Administrative Officer

Posted on Feb 13, 2020 in Carousel, People, Scroll Images, Sutter Lakeside Hospital, Uncategorized

LAKEPORT, Calif. – Sutter Health announced today it has selected Scott Knight as chief administrative officer of Sutter Lakeside Hospital, effective Feb. 3. Knight was previously Assistant Administrator of Sutter Tracy Community Hospital.

“Scott is committed to serving the community, as he demonstrated by serving on the boards of both the Tracy and Ripon Chambers of Commerce,” said Julie Petrini, president and CEO of Hospitals, Sutter Health Bay Area. “I know Scott is eager to bring this passion for community to his new role at Sutter Lakeside.”

About Scott Knight

Scott earned his bachelor’s degree in Business Management from Brigham Young University and a master’s degree in Health Care Administration from University of Washington. Scott has a broad healthcare background in finance, revenue cycle, planning, business development, marketing and community relations, operations, and administration.

While at Sutter Tracy, Scott provided leadership for non-nursing operations and business development. During his tenure, Sutter Tracy received patient safety awards from various organizations, and in 2020 was awarded a CMS 5-star rating – the highest ranking possible – for overall performance on quality measures including readmission rates, safety of care and patient experience.

About Sutter Health

Sutter Health is more than 60,000 people strong thanks to its integrated network of physicians, employees and volunteers. Rooted in Sutter Health’s not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care that feels personal. From physician offices to hospitals to outpatient care centers and home services, they proudly support the more than 3 million people in their care—nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Sutter team members adopt new technologies, make novel discoveries and embrace creative thinking to help patients and communities achieve their best health. From its street nurse program that provides check-ups for homeless people, to telemedicine-aided specialist consultations, to walk-in care clinics, to video visits, the Sutter Health team goes beyond traditional models to make care more convenient and to nurture and empower people throughout their healthcare journey.

For more information about the Sutter Health network visit: sutterhealth.org| facebook.com/sutterhealth| youtube.com/sutterhealth| twitter.com/sutterhealth

Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital Names New CEO, Dan Peterson

Posted on Feb 2, 2020 in People, Scroll Images, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, Uncategorized

SANTA ROSA, Calif. Sutter Health announced today it has selected Dan Peterson as chief executive officer of Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (SSRRH), effective Feb. 3. Peterson succeeds Mike Purvis who served as CEO since 2009 and is retiring. As CEO, Peterson will manage all administrative and health care activities for the hospital and provide overall leadership and direction for all hospital physicians and staff. Peterson will also lead facility growth and improvement efforts at Sutter Santa Rosa, including a $173 million hospital expansion and renovation slated for completion in 2022.

“Dan is a skilled hospital administrator and the perfect choice to lead Sutter Santa Rosa and move our mission forward,” said Julie Petrini, president and CEO of Hospitals, Sutter Health Bay Area. “We are pleased to welcome Dan and his family back to the Santa Rosa area and look forward to a bright future as we expand the high-quality health care offered in Sonoma County.”

About Dan Peterson

Dan Peterson studied Economics at Brigham Young University in Utah and completed a master’s degree in Health Services Administration at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He started his career as a director for ambulatory services at UCLA Health System in Los Angeles before moving into roles of increasing responsibility. This included the CEO and Administrator role at The Surgery Center of Santa Rosa for nearly five years. Since 2017, he has served as Chief Administrative Officer for Sutter Lakeside Hospital.

Peterson has a track record for excellence in quality, patient experience, and staff engagement. During his time at Lakeside, the hospital achieved top hospital in Sutter Health for Quality performance in both 2018 and 2019, and top hospital in Sutter Health for Patient Experience in 2018. Peterson also oversaw the complete hospital evacuation and repopulation during the Mendocino Complex Fire, among other accomplishments, and is an active participant in professional organizations, including the American College of Healthcare Executives.

“It continues to be a privilege to work in the Sutter Health network alongside the best and brightest physicians, medical and administrative staff in Northern California,” said Peterson. “I am humbled and honored to now lead more than 1,500 men and women at SSRRH who provide exceptional and high-quality care.”

About Sutter Health
Sutter Health is more than 60,000 people strong thanks to its integrated network of physicians, employees and volunteers. Rooted in Sutter Health’s not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care that feels personal. From physician offices to hospitals to outpatient care centers and home services, they proudly support the more than 3 million people in their care—nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Sutter team members adopt new technologies, make novel discoveries and embrace creative thinking to help patients and communities achieve their best health. From its street nurse program that provides check-ups for homeless people, to telemedicine-aided specialist consultations, to walk-in care clinics, to video visits, the Sutter Health team goes beyond traditional models to make care more convenient and to nurture and empower people throughout their healthcare journey.

For more information about the Sutter Health network visit: sutterhealth.org | facebook.com/sutterhealth | youtube.com/sutterhealth | twitter.com/sutterhealth