Pediatric Care

Baby Basics: Sutter’s Smart Start Program Expands with Funding from First 5 Lake County

Posted on Jul 9, 2019 in Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Innovation, Pediatric Care, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Lakeside Hospital, Women's Services

LAKEPORT, Calif. – New babies come with new worries. “Parents leave the hospital, head home, and suddenly realize they’re solely responsible for caring for an infant” said Jackie Rad, R.N.C., M.S.N., nurse manager of the Sutter Lakeside Family Birth Center. “On top of sleep deprivation and recovery from childbirth, many families in our area experience income and housing instability, which can result in unsafe conditions for newborns.” Read More

The Dog-tor Will See You Now

Posted on Jun 18, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Carousel, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images

Therapy Dog Cares for Patients at CPMC Van Ness Campus

Posey with 16 year old pediatric patient Buddy Pendergast

SAN FRANCISCO–Anxiety and fear are common issues that pediatricians and staff address every day when caring for children inside Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center Emergency Department. They enlist child life specialists to assist, as well as a very special team member, Posey the Therapy Dog.

Posey partners with emergency department pediatrician, Vince Tamariz, M.D., to see young patients who come in for assistance with an illness or injury. While Dr. Tamariz addresses the health issue, Posey addresses the stress children face when coming into this unfamiliar environment. With a soft and unhurried approach, Posey can easily distract a child from the frightening medical activity that is underway and bring a sense of calm and curiosity to the child, reducing the fear and anxiety.

“When Posey walks into the room kids have something to focus on that is a distraction from what is happening with their care,” said Dr. Tamariz. “Even parents admit that Posey helps relieve the stress they feel resulting from the need to bring their child to the emergency department.”

When there is a break in the activity of the emergency department, Posey can be found on the pediatric floor of the hospital. Posey makes her rounds, checking in on young patients to see if anyone needs her loving assistance. When she walks into a room spirits lift and children have a break from the ailments that bring them to the hospital. While patients love to see Posey and pet her soft fur, she will also hop up on the bed—when invited—to lay beside a patient who may have difficulty reaching her or getting out of the bed.

Many studies show that petting a dog makes you feel good; it increases oxytocin in the body, which amplifies feelings of happiness and empathy. It also lowers the heart rate, decreases blood pressure and reduces cortisol (the stress hormone). These results can make a big difference for children in the hospital.

Specially-Designed Pacifier Uses Music to Teach Premature Infants How to Feed

Posted on Jun 14, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Pediatric Care, Quality

Parents’ Voice Singing a Lullaby Rewards Baby for Sucking

Alissa and Charles O’Neill with baby Olive

SAN FRANCISCO—Premature babies often lack a developed sucking reflex, leaving them unable to feed orally. And the inability to feed is a common reason new born babies remain hospitalized after birth. To help develop the sucking reflex more quickly, California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), part of Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network of care, is using a new device called a Pacifier-Activated Lullaby (PAL) in its Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

According to CPMC’s music therapist Elisha Madsen, MME, MT-BC, recent studies show that about 70 percent of the premature infants who receive PAL treatment respond positively to it. They increase their ability to eat on their own, gain weight, and go home from the NICU earlier.

Charles O’Neill and baby Olive at home

The PAL rewards and motivates babies to suck on a pacifier to help strengthen their sucking reflex. The special pacifier is attached to a sensor module that measures the strength of the baby’s sucking reflex. When the PAL detects that the baby has sucked on the pacifier to the predetermined strength, the baby earns a reward –a lullaby recorded by the baby’s own mom or dad.

Madsen explains that hearing their parent singing a lullaby motivates babies to continue sucking on the pacifier –which improves the sucking reflex. “Within two and a half minutes, she says, “most babies learn they will have to suck on the pacifier to receive their music reward.”

“It’s exciting for us at CPMC to be able to offer parents a direct role in their baby’s care where they are the reason the baby’s health is improving,” said Madsen. “Parents just light up when they see their baby responding to their singing voices and learn the skills they need to eat and go home. It is just precious to see this reaction.”

Move-In Day is Near for San Francisco’s Newest Medical Office Building

Posted on May 8, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation, Women's Services

10-story facility integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care

SAN FRANCISCO –Sutter Health today announced the June 3 opening of Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation’s (SPMF) Van Ness and Geary medical office building (or MOB) at 1100 Van Ness Ave. The building, owned by Pacific Medical Buildings, is a 10-story, 250,000 sq. ft. facility located across the street from Sutter’s new CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital, which opened in March. More than 120 specialty physicians and clinicians from the Sutter Health network will occupy five floors of the building in the heart of San Francisco. The MOB completes the creation of a coordinated medical campus community that integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care.

The new Van Ness and Geary Medical Office Building (MOB) opens its doors on Monday, June 3. This 250,000 sq. ft. building completes a coordinated medical campus community that integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care.

Physicians and clinicians affiliated with SPMF, the Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) and California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) will occupy five floors. Private physicians will lease space on floors 7-10. Among the practice areas: advanced organ therapy (including transplant services), women’s services, medical and surgical specialty clinics, neurosciences, and cardiovascular services. In addition to a 383-spot underground parking garage, a Walgreens pharmacy is located on the street level. Lab and imaging facilities will be available by July 15. A 125-foot-long, staff-only tunnel connects the MOB with the hospital, completing the new medical campus community.

“Sutter’s Van Ness and Geary medical office building is designed to enhance convenience and access to high-quality care, as well as create an exceptional experience for patients, their families and friends,” said Kelvin Lam, M.D., Interim CEO for SPMF San Francisco and Marin. “The opening of this modern and centrally-located facility adds another world-class, multi-specialty healthcare center to the Sutter portfolio. This medical office building incorporates a powerful healing environment with an integrated continuum of services to support the community for decades to come.”

A truly integrated healthcare network

Sutter’s integrated care model allows patients to access primary care in local neighborhoods and higher level specialty care at the new MOB and at other care centers throughout the Bay Area.  The CPMC Van Ness hospital serves as the hub for all consolidated inpatient facilities and outpatient services. With the completion of the MOB, the campus knits together hospital and emergency services, affiliated medical offices and specialty outpatient services – including convenient underground parking for patients.

The Sutter Health Newborn Connections program will be occupying space on the entry level of the building. From perinatal classes and lactation services to breastfeeding and baby supplies, Newborn Connections provides expecting families with a range of support from pregnancy to parenthood.

“We’ve been looking forward to the ‘birth’ of this vibrant space to provide families with easy access to all of CPMC’s Newborn Connections classes and services,” said Paula Sulkis, supervisor of the Newborn Connections program. “With Sutter’s new CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital located directly across the street, the need for mom, baby and new families to pop in and out of multiple facilities all over town just to make their appointments is eliminated.”

Designed to achieve LEED Silver certification, the MOB was constructed and operates in an environmentally conscious way.

The building will feature:

  • A reduction of water use by 40 percent with water efficient fixtures
  • An energy reduction of 35 percent through lighting control design
  • A 2-year contract to purchase at least 8 kwh/gsf of green power
  • 25 percent of materials made from recycled content
  • 75 percent of building waste diverted from landfill
  • Certified low-emitting materials used in furniture and no urea formaldehyde in any wood composites
  • Bike parking and storage as well as showers and storage rooms that encourage alternate transportation

By the numbers

  • Planning and design completed in July 2017
  • 250,000 sq. ft. total; 114,000 sq. ft. available for Sutter provider clinics
  • Capacity for 129 providers
  • 20,000 sq. ft. for Ancillary Services, including a lab, imaging and Newborn Connections
  • Six-level, subterranean parking structure, with 383 parking spaces and a staff-only tunnel that connects the building to the CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital

Services Offered

The medical office building features the following services from the Sutter Health Network:

  • Comprehensive neuroscience center
  • Cardiovascular services
  • Maternity and women’s health services
  • General and complex gastroenterology
  • Surgical specialties
  • Outpatient imaging
  • Advanced organ therapies (organ transplant)
  • Women’s ultrasound
  • Outpatient laboratory and imaging
  • Newborn Connections (support and lactation consulting for new parents)

Unused Building Gets Medical Makeover in West Roseville

Posted on Mar 15, 2019 in Expanding Access, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Foundation, Transformation

The new Sutter Medical Foundation care center is converted from a building originally intended as a CVS retail store, but never opened.

ROSEVILLE, Calif. – A West Roseville building originally constructed about 10 years ago to be a CVS retail location has been converted by Sutter Medical Foundation into a 17,000-square-foot modern health-care center housing primary-care physicians and associated services.

The new Sutter Medical Foundation West Roseville Care Center at 2050 Blue Oaks Blvd., which opened this week, brings convenient primary care patient services to children, adults and families to the growing community of West Roseville.

“This care center aligns perfectly with Sutter Medical Foundation’s vision to provide health care with the highest levels of quality, access and affordability,” said Sutter Valley Medical Foundation President Theresa Frei. “We are extremely happy to have converted this building into our first care center in West Roseville.”

The existing building was erected a decade ago but was never opened as a retail space. Sutter Medical Foundation saw the building’s potential as a medical office building and was able to repurpose and convert it into a beautiful, functional medical facility that will serve thousands of local residents in the growing area of West Roseville.

The conversion to a medical office building is a gorgeous addition to the West Roseville community.

“The project was the culmination of the hard work and coordination of many people from our Sutter Medical Foundation and Sutter Medical Group teams, city planners and business partners in the community,” said Sergio Vincenti, Regional Administrative Director for SMF’s Foothill Region. “Utilizing this existing building to bring health care to this area of Roseville is a win for everyone involved.”

The result of the coordinated discussions and planning efforts is a care center with 17,000 square feet of exam rooms, a lab draw station, and ample parking for patients.

“Having practiced in Roseville for the last four-and-a-half years, I’ve taken care of many patients from the West Roseville area,” said Dr. Craig Corp, a Sutter Medical Group pediatrician who previously practiced at SMF’s 3100 Douglas Blvd. location, nine miles southeast of the new care center. “When I heard that we had an opportunity to move to this location, I jumped at the chance. It gives my patients in this community an option to see me in their own neighborhood. Local care is important to a community, and we are thrilled to be here.”

Dr. Corp is one of the physicians who has moved into the new facility. Here are the Sutter Medical Group clinicians who will see patients in the new care center:

  • Pediatrics: Craig C. Corp, M.D., David Grattendick, M.D., Sarah E. Henshaw, D.O., and Patricia Gurney, N.P.
  • Family Medicine: Barbara Spinelli, M.D., Mark Lam, M.D., and Kathy Lauchaire, P.A.
  • Internal Medicine: Nelson Raitt, M.D. and Lakhvir Kaur, M.D.

The new Sutter Medical Foundation medical office building, which is next to the Fiddyment Farm housing development and just down the street from Sun City, currently has a staff of 28, with 19 of them being newly hired for the opening of the care center. In the near future, Sutter Medical Foundation has plans to add dermatology, an internal medicine advanced practice clinician and another family medicine physician.

“We are so excited to be able to provide care here,” said Susana DeVirgen, Sutter Medical Foundation’s site supervisor for the new care center. “We look forward to providing comprehensive primary care services for our patients at this location for years to come.”

Toddler Nearly Dies on Airsoft Gun Pellet, Is Saved by Sutter Surgeon

Posted on Mar 13, 2019 in Pediatric Care, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Joy Graf, M.D., reunites with the toddler whose life she saved by extracting a pellet that the child had inhaled.

“She went from near-death to back home in 24 hours.”

That’s how Daniel Falco, M.D., co-medical director of the Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Children’s Center, sums up the story of Genevieve Sayers, the 18-month-old daughter of of Marissa and Kevin Sayers of Rocklin.

During breakfast on Jan. 29, Evie suddenly stopped breathing, turned purple and stopped responding. Her parents rushed her to the nearby fire station and an ambulance took her to Sutter Roseville Medical Center, where she was stabilized and sent by ambulance to Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Children’s Center for emergency pediatric surgery. Doctors at the Sutter Children’s Center didn’t expect the child to survive the transport, but the Sutter Critical Care Team kept her alive.

Once at the hospital, she was expected to be put on a heart-and-lung-bypass machine called ECMO, but pediatric surgeon Joy Graf, M.D., was miraculously able to extract the pellet quickly.

Once awakened from sedation, Evie was back to her rambunctious self and left the hospital the next morning. The story illustrates how the Sutter staffs in Roseville and Sacramento worked together to work a miracle.

“I never thought I would appreciate attitude from a child,” mom Marissa Sayers says, “but every screech or flailing arm means that she is still our same little girl. … Everyone hug their kids tight;  your world can change in the blink of an eye.”

See the complete story of the family’s tearful reunion with the doctors and nurses who saved this child’s life on KOVR-CBS-13 and KXTV-ABC-10.