Mental Health & Addiction Care

How to Weather the Storm: Top Tips for Improving Personal Resiliency

Posted on May 20, 2020 in Mental Health & Addiction Care, Scroll Images


SACRAMENTO, Calif. –During tough times, the ability to bounce back from hardship comes in handy. But what if mental resiliency is not someone’s strong suit?

Urmi Patel, PsyD

Urmi Patel, PsyD, a clinical psychologist and director of clinical care for Sutter Mental Health and Addiction Care, defines resilience as “the ability to cope mentally and emotionally with trauma or difficulty, and quickly get back to a state of equilibrium.” And the good news is, according to Dr. Patel, “In general, people have the ability to grow their resilience. It’s not an innate capability, it can develop.”

So how does one develop more personal resiliency? In a recent San Francisco Chronicle article, “Resilience: 15 ways to weather life’s challenges,” Dr. Patel offers her top tips for improving one’s ability to bounce back from adversity.

Additional Resources:

People who feel their emotional condition is serious should call their doctor or go to Mental Health America’s website, which offers tips and resources for people who feel stressed, anxious or depressed.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24/7: (800) 273-8255

TrevorLifeline for LGBTQ Youth in Crisis 24/7: (866) 488-7386

California Peer-Run Warm Line 24/7 for Californians Needing Emotional Support: (855) 845-7415

Practical Tips to Reduce Anxiety During Uncertain Times

Posted on Mar 18, 2020 in Mental Health & Addiction Care, Scroll Images

Times of uncertainty—like the global COVID-19 pandemic—can spike anxiety in many people. Lives are upended and routines are erased. Schools are closed. Loved ones 65 years and above are homebound. Employees are working from home exclusively. And more importantly, as the number of COVID-19 cases rise across the U.S., causing concern for public health and the health of those closest to us.

How does one find solace during these difficult times? Urmi Patel, Psy.D., clinical psychologist and director, clinical care for Sutter Mental Health Services, provides practical suggestions for those who feel unsure and overwhelmed during this unprecedented time.

Meaningful Engagement
Social isolation may appear unavoidable right now, so it’s more important than ever to work together as a family and stay connected as a community. Dr. Patel suggests checking in on friends and family via phone calls or video chats. “Talk about things outside of COVID-19 to remind one another there are many other things to focus on during difficult times,” she says.

Modeling
Dr. Patel says children will look to their parents’ or caretakers’ behaviors and emotional responses for cues on how to manage their own emotions during difficult times. Address children’s concerns or anxiety together as a family so they also see how their parents or caretakers are managing theirs.

Management
Information is everywhere and it can be extremely valuable as the COVID-19 situation evolves. However, people should consider limiting their exposure to social media or the Internet if they find themselves overwhelmed by the information. “If need be, consider looking to trusted sources of information, such as the CDC or news media outlets, to get important information daily,” says Dr. Patel.

Movement
Given social distancing is recommended throughout the world, consider implementing other forms of physical activity in the home or outdoors, if permitted. Simple daily physical exercises can be helpful to maintain a sense of health and balance.

Mindful
Mindfulness goes beyond one’s self-awareness and acceptance—it means being conscious of others. COVID-19 is impacting many countries and individuals around the world. Dr. Patel recommends not attaching the pandemic to one ethnicity or nationality, and not avoiding others due to stigma or fear. “Try to remain kind to each other during this stressful time,” she says.