Innovation

Special Hospital Unit Prevents Mental and Physical Decline in Elderly Patients

Posted on Nov 29, 2018 in Affiliates, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SAN FRANCISCO“Mom just isn’t the same since she came home from the hospital.”

Wendy Zachary, M.D., a geriatrician with Sutter Health’s California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, used to hear this complaint often. But since launching the volunteer-powered Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), her patients are safely going home sooner, are readmitted less frequently and suffer fewer falls.

 

Dr. Zachary and her team opened an Acute Care for the Elderly (ACE) unit at the new CPMC Mission Bernal Campus hospital in August, building upon the success of the HELP program at CPMC’s Davies and Pacific campuses. Mission Bernal’s ACE unit is the first one of its kind for Sutter Health and one of only about 200 nationwide.

Nationally, ACE units have a proven, two-decade success record of helping decrease incidents of hospital complications like delirium, bring down costs, decrease length of hospital stays, improve coordination and mobility and reduce readmissions. This is critical because elderly hospitalized patients are prone to suffering delirium –which, according to Dr. Zachary, has the same risk of mortality as a heart attack.

“We know when geriatric patients are located in the same area of the hospital, such as in an ACE unit, they get better care,” says Dr. Zachary. “This is because the care providers see similar issues over and over, and the more cases you see, the more comfortable you become treating these patients.”

Mission Bernal’s ACE unit offers 19 patient beds, an activity room and a specialized physical therapy room—and staff and volunteers that are specially trained to care for older patients through the HELP program. Read More

Angel Eye Allows NICU Families to Bond with Their Baby While Away from the Hospital

Posted on Nov 20, 2018 in Innovation, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Uncategorized

Candace Wilson speaks about the gift of NICU cameras on Tuesday with her husband, Rich (left).

SACRAMENTO — Exactly three years ago, Nov. 20, 2015, a little girl was born to Candace and Rich Wilson of Grass Valley, Calif. She spent a couple of weeks in neonatal intensive care units before succumbing to her health issues. During her short life, Candace and Rich were able to spend most of their time with her and the specialists. But they saw many families who didn’t have the time off work or the financial wherewithal to be there with their sick babies. They founded a nonprofit in Norah’s memory to help those families, called the Norah Foundation.

One of the cameras is already in use at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento.

The Norah Foundation has already helped many local NICU families with gas and food cards, hotel vouchers and other support, but the Wilsons felt what was really needed is a way for these families to be with their sick babies even when they couldn’t be in the NICU in person. They started a campaign called Always Together to raise money to install NICU cameras at the bedside of babies in Northern California’s largest NICU at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento. The first two were unveiled Tuesday, Nov. 20, Norah’s third birthday. Read More

ER on Wheels: Groundbreaking Approach to Stroke Care

Posted on Sep 24, 2018 in Innovation, Scroll Images

BURLINGAME, Calif. –Experts estimate that every minute treatment for stroke is delayed can mean life or death for 2 million brain cells. Strokes are the fifth leading cause of death and the top contributor to long-term disability in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In the Bay Area, not-for-profit Sutter Health’s Mills-Peninsula Medical Center is partnering to pilot a specially-equipped and -staffed ambulance, called a mobile stroke unit (MSU). The goal is to test whether bringing stroke diagnosis and treatment to patients—rather than waiting for them to arrive at the emergency department—improves outcomes.

Mills-Peninsula’s new mobile stroke unit will bring care to patients on scene.

Mills-Peninsula is the first hospital in Northern California to pilot a mobile stroke unit, joining medical centers in New York, Chicago, Cleveland, Houston, Denver and Los Angeles. Read More

Rock Health Features Sutter’s Approach to Innovation, Human-Centered Design

Posted on Sep 11, 2018 in Innovation

SACRAMENTO, Calif. –When Sutter Health created its design and innovation team in 2015, the goal was to build a radically new approach to innovation and help make the healthcare experience more simple, engaging and human.

In September 2018, Rock Health interviewed Sutter Health’s Megan Moyer, director of Design and Innovation, and Katie Simpson, director of Strategic Partnerships and Innovation, to learn how the integrated health network works alongside entrepreneurs to pilot and integrate some of the best solutions into the hands of care teams and patients quickly and safely – transforming the future of healthcare.

Read the full interview with Sutter Health Design & Innovation team members on the Rock Health blog.

New CPMC Mission Bernal Hospital Campus Gets Smart with Technology

Posted on Aug 22, 2018 in Innovation, Uncategorized

A Vocera device, shown here, instantly connects staff by voice or secure text.

SAN FRANCISCO — When the Sutter Health network’s new CPMC Mission Bernal Campus opens on Aug. 25, patients will not only have access top-notch quality health care, they will also be wowed by the advanced technologies the hospital has to offer.

The state-of-the-art hospital embraces everything we love best about smart technology—comfort, convenience and security—and integrates this technology into every floor of the new building. From Wi-Fi powered hand hygiene, to sophisticated infant security, to “micro-chipping” equipment so it never gets lost— the innovative technology aims to bring a higher quality, more satisfying experience for patients and providers. Read More

Surgical Breakthrough Allows Discreet Scar for Pediatric Heart Patients

Posted on Aug 3, 2018 in Innovation, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento pediatric cardiothoracic surgeon Dr. Naruhito Watanabe is believed to be the first surgeon in the United States to repair an atrial septal defect (ASD) via a right mini-thoracotomy, with an incision just below the armpit. This minimally invasive approach reduces the healing time for the young patients and allows them to grow up without having embarrassing chest scars.

An ASD is a hole in the wall between the two upper chambers of the heart, called the atria. Some of these holes may spontaneously close as the infant grows; however, it is one of the more common congenital heart defects requiring surgical repair, with about 40,000 children are born each year with congenital heart defects in the United States alone.

One of Dr. Watanabe’s patients, 3-year-old Taneigha Avila of Sacramento, recently underwent this minimally invasive procedure and now has a repaired ASD with an incision that is barely noticeable. The patient’s recovery was phenomenal and the family has been very pleased with the results.  Read More