Expanding Access

Sutter Health and Lyft Collaborate to Provide Patients and Staff With Improved Transportation Options

Posted on Jan 13, 2020 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Scroll Images

Collaboration increases access to care and enhances patient/provider experience

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. AND SAN FRANCISCOLyft, the transportation network company, and the not-for-profit network Sutter Health are collaborating on an opportunity to help support patient and staff transportation needs. Starting today, Sutter hospitals and care centers around Northern California will have the option to start implementing customized, individual transportation programs — an important next step in simplifying access to care.

How clinical staff get to and from work isn’t always considered when evaluating pain points within a workflow, but it plays an important role in health care delivery. Sutter recognized this when looking for ways to better support its home health care teams, who can use their own vehicles to travel to and from patient homes. As an alternative, Lyft can arrange transportation for Sutter home health providers who support patients with needs ranging from wound care, physical therapy or nutritional support. This arrangement can help maximize a clinician’s time with each patient, while also saving wear and tear that comes with using a personal vehicle for work.

“We are reimagining the ways we provide and deliver care, which includes increasing access to services and making them more convenient,” said Chris Waugh, chief innovation officer for Sutter Health. “For some, it’s not as simple as traveling from Point A to Point B. There are numerous real-world factors in between. Our approach takes the burden away from our patients and staff, and puts them in the best position to receive the care they need or deliver the care they are trained to give.”

Sutter and Lyft were able to test several transportation scenarios through previous pilot work over the course of the past couple of years. Several examples, below, resulted in increased efficiencies, including faster, more reliable pick-ups, lower costs, and an understanding of the unique needs of a healthcare environment.

Reduced wait times: At Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center Pacific campus, patients discharged from the emergency department were offered a ride to a location of their choice. In three months’ time, the program reduced wait times from an average of 23 minutes to three minutes.
Cost savings: The pilot achieved a cost savings of approximately 25% compared to other transportation services previously used.
Greater transportation efficiency: Ambulatory surgery center staff throughout Sutter’s Palo Alto Medical Foundation were able to more easily transport staff between care centers as compared to services previously used.

“At Lyft, we’re committed to improving access to care while also increasing operational efficiencies and driving down costs for medical providers. Sutter’s headquarters in Northern California are home to some of the greatest diversity in the nation – socioeconomic, ethnic and geographic – resulting in an incredibly unique set of transportation challenges for both patients and staff. We’re looking forward to a continued partnership that allows us to provide innovative transportation options that make an impact in urban, suburban and rural settings alike. Pilot results have already shown reduced wait times and improved rider experience,” explained Megan Callahan, VP of Healthcare at Lyft.

The diverse needs of Sutter’s patient and staff call for flexible options, and this partnership with Lyft allows different care sites to customize their rideshare services to best support their communities.

For example, in more rural areas where transportation options historically aren’t as reliable, patients can count on rides to and from chemotherapy, radiation or dialysis appointments. In cities, Sutter staff can take a Lyft ride from public transit centers to Sutter care centers as an affordable alternative to parking. This allows Sutter to positively impact social determinants of health – notably, making care more accessible through transportation and increasing opportunities for patients to get the treatment they need.

“We’re excited for how these results will interplay,” said Waugh. “We believe they can help spur fundamental change on a macro level, and also help relieve stress and create comfort for individuals on a micro level. Big or small, these shifts can help create a more meaningful experience that gives patients the opportunity to stay on track with their care plans.”

Forward-Looking Statements 

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements generally relate to future events or Lyft’s future financial or operating performance as well as Lyft’s other expectations, strategies, priorities, plans or intentions. Lyft’s expectations and beliefs regarding these matters may not materialize, and actual results in future periods are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected, including those more fully described in Lyft’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including in Lyft’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2019, filed with the SEC on November 4, 2019.

Sutter Health Plus Adds Dignity Health Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz County

Posted on Jan 8, 2020 in Affiliates, Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Sutter Health Plus

The HMO’s network expands to include Dominican Hospital as of Jan. 1, 2020

SANTA CRUZ, Calif.Sutter Health Plus, a not-for-profit HMO affiliated with Sutter Health, and Dignity Health, a healthcare provider system, announce the signing of agreements to add Dignity Health Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz to the Sutter Health Plus network effective Jan. 1, 2020.

The Sutter Health Plus network in Santa Cruz County includes Palo Alto Medical Foundation and its care centers throughout the county, Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center, and Watsonville Community Hospital.

“We’re excited to add Dominican Hospital to our network,” said Brian Fellner, Sutter Health Plus CEO. “Our members are at the center of everything we do, and Dominican Hospital will offer members who live or work in Santa Cruz more choice and increased access to high-quality, affordable care.”

As of Jan. 1, the Sutter Health Plus network includes 30 hospitals and campuses, more than 8,000 providers, hundreds of conveniently located facilities, and dozens of urgent care centers and Sutter Walk-In Care locations, including the recently opened walk-in care in Aptos. Members also have access to same-day video visits for non-urgent, everyday health needs.

Dominican Hospital has been serving the Santa Cruz County community for more than 75 years, offering advanced, comprehensive care including cardiac surgery, a cancer center, orthopedic care, robotic surgery, a birth center and level 3 NICU, and emergency services.

“Dignity Health and Sutter Health have been longtime partners providing care to Santa Cruz County residents,” said Todd Strumwasser, MD, president of Dignity Health’s Northern California Division. “As part of the Sutter Health Plus network, we’re pleased to offer increased access to the county’s full-service, nationally recognized hospital.”

Dominican Hospital is the third Dignity Health facility in the Sutter Health Plus network, joining St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Stockton and Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City.

Mark and Mary Stevens Give $1 Million to Mental Health Programs for Adolescents

Posted on Dec 9, 2019 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Mary and Mark Stevens

PALO ALTO, Calif.–Silicon Valley billionaire venture capitalist Mark Stevens and his wife Mary, have given Sutter’s Palo Alto Medical Foundation $1 million to advance mental health programs for youth (aged 16-24) across the South Bay. The gift underscores the importance of identifying mental health issues earlier, pointing young people and their families to services and resources that can help them sooner, ultimately benefiting health in the entire community.

“Mental health is historically an area of healthcare that has been overlooked and under resourced in the community environment,” Mark Stevens, partner at S-Cubed Capital says. “If we continue to allow mental illness to fester in our youth too long, the cost to the community and society magnify. We are excited to make resources available to combat this important issue and to partner with PAMF.”

One in four adults in the U.S. lives with a mental health condition such as anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or substance abuse disorder. It is estimated that 3.2 million adolescents experience at least one major depressive episode each year.

“Between 1993 and around 2005, I’d see one or two children a year exhibiting anxiety, depression, suicidal ideations or bipolar disorder,” says Bruce Block, M.D., a PAMF pediatrician in Santa Cruz. “Now I see at least one or two every day.”

Many people grapple with multiple mental health challenges at once, and left untreated these conditions can significantly impair their quality of life. Research shows that, on average, people wait eight to 10 years to pursue professional assistance.

Designing for Transitional Age Youth

Like other patient groups, transitional-age youth often struggle to access timely and appropriate care. After extensive interviews with community members, clinicians and physicians, teams across Sutter have pinpointed key opportunity areas for change. This mental health campaign will focus on three areas:

• Further integrating mental health into the primary care setting
• Developing new models for expanding caregiver capacity to pilot virtual care visits and initiating new mobile technology solutions
• Creating a new communications platform for better community support

“We have an opportunity to redesign mental health care in the primary care setting and well beyond it, and this generous gift from the Stevens family is a tremendous start,” says Shahna Rogosin, M.D., chair, department of psychiatry and behavioral health, PAMF. “This initiative will help to ensure seamless mental health care for adolescents and young adults and provide them with the timely treatment, robust tools, and comprehensive support they need to thrive.”

Mark and Mary Stevens are longtime patients and donors to PAMF, providing a foundational gift for the PAMF Community Cancer Center in Sunnyvale in 2012.

“We enjoy supporting forward leading non-profit organizations,” says Mary Stevens. “Our entire family receives health care at PAMF and they have been such a valuable resource for the community—over thinking where healthcare is going by adopting new technologies and building innovative programming like this mental health initiative.”

The Giving Pledge

Mark and Mary signed the Giving Pledge in 2013—a commitment started by Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett to encourage the world’s wealthiest individuals and families to dedicate the majority of their wealth to giving back.

“It gives us great joy to see the impact of our gifts and we look forward to widening our aperture of giving in healthcare and in other initiatives that will make a difference in our community and in society in the future.”

Takin’ it to the Streets: ‘Magic Bus’ Brings Healthcare to Homeless

Posted on Dec 3, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

New mobile service expands access to care for San Francisco’s most vulnerable

SAN FRANCISCO –Providing access to healthcare at the curbside to homeless people in the City’s Tenderloin neighborhood is the goal of HealthRIGHT 360’s new mobile healthcare service. The mobile clinic is a collaborative effort with major support from California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), a member of the not-for-profit Sutter Health’s integrated network of care.

“These are challenging times in healthcare, especially for the vulnerable populations we serve. Being able to provide Mobile Healthcare Services is a huge step forward,” said Vitka Eisen, MSW, Ed.D HealthRIGHT 360 president and CEO. “Over the years, our clients have gotten sicker, they have many more complex health challenges, more co-occurring mental health conditions, and fewer resources. Everyone is somebody’s child, somebody’s mother, someone who matters, we see the person and we’re here to heal.”

“Sutter and CPMC are proud to provide funds to help acquire and equip this medical bus. HealthRIGHT 360 addresses the healthcare needs of the City’s homeless population, including medical issues related to complications from behavioral health and substance use, with a focus on people seeking services in the high-need Tenderloin neighborhood,” said Dr. Warren Browner, CEO of CPMC.

HealthRIGHT 360’s new mobile service builds on its innovative, community-based healthcare model that integrates medical, dental, mental health, and substance use treatment for people who are very low-income and often marginally housed or experiencing homelessness. The street-based model is staffed by a range of medical providers and an outreach team, the mobile clinic has two complete exam rooms, a bathroom, and an elevator wheelchair lift. Currently operating in the Tenderloin neighborhood, the services will expand to the Haight Ashbury and other areas of great need across San Francisco.

“This mobile clinic is all about meeting people where they are and bringing quality medical care directly to the people who need it most,” said San Francisco Mayor London N. Breed. “It’s another great example of HealthRIGHT 360’s commitment to responding directly to the most pressing needs of San Franciscans, and demonstrates the importance of nonprofit organizations, the private sector, and government working together.”

In addition to Sutter Health and CPMC, other sponsors of HealthRIGHT 360’s Mobile Healthcare Services include Veritas Investments and Wells Fargo Bank.

HealthRIGHT 360 started in the 1960s during the historic “Summer of Love” in San Francisco, where two of its legacy organizations, Haight Ashbury Free Clinics and Walden House, provided medical care and substance use disorder treatment to the youth who came to the City, motivated by the anti-war movement, music, sex, drugs, and the desire to bring about cultural change.

The Cancer Treatment Within You

Posted on Nov 20, 2019 in Affiliates, California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, People, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation

How blood, urine and gene mutations may unlock secrets to lung cancer treatment options.

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When Online Matchmaking and Cancer Treatment Collide

Posted on Nov 19, 2019 in Affiliates, Expanding Access, Innovation, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Transformation

More than 600 types of drugs exist to treat cancer. A new tool will help doctors supercharge their searches for the ones that will work best for their patients.

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