Expanding Access

Racing Against Time, Mobile Stroke Unit Treats First Stroke Patient

Posted on Feb 11, 2019 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Scroll Images, Women's Services

The Sutter Health Mobile Stroke Unit team got the call they had been preparing for and raced into action.

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Sutter’s New CPMC Van Ness Campus Open House a Smashing Success

Posted on Feb 2, 2019 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO – Sutter’s new CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital hosted a free community open house to nearly 3,000 people on Saturday, Feb. 2, offering our Bay Area neighbors a sneak peek of the new facility ahead of opening day on March 2.

Festivities kicked off with lion dancers from the Jing Mo Athletic Association, sharing wishes of good fortune. Free activities for families included a teddy bear ‘first aid’ clinic (hosted by CPMC’s Child Life experts), face painting and balloon animals; silent disco; silent yoga; chair massages; photo booths; live music; and healthy cooking demonstrations by Williams-Sonoma. Many visitors eagerly signed up for tours of the hospital, too.

The 11-story hospital includes 274 acute-care beds and houses myriad inpatient services – with an emphasis on maternity care, pediatrics, transplant, orthopedics, emergency and cardiac care. The hospital also uses first-in-the-nation seismic technology, which allows it to withstand a major earthquake. When fully complete, the campus will knit together Sutter hospital and emergency services, affiliated medical offices and specialty outpatient services.

 

Sutter Amador Hospital CEO to Retire, Leaving Legacy of Community Health Excellence

Posted on Jan 16, 2019 in Carousel, Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Sutter Amador Hospital, Sutter Medical Foundation, Transformation, Uncategorized

JACKSON, Calif. – Anne Platt is retiring March 1 as CEO of Sutter Amador Hospital after 14 years presiding over unprecedented expansions and improvements to the medical campus and the local healthcare community. Replacing her is Tom Dickson, who has led some of Arizona’s most respected hospitals and has a proven record for excellence in patient care. His first day at Sutter Amador Hospital is Feb. 11.

Sutter Amador Hospital CEO Anne Platt is retiring after 14 years of leading several expansions in medical services for the Gold Country communities.

“Sutter really struck gold when Anne was recruited to take the helm of Sutter Amador Hospital,” said Grant Davies, CEO of Sutter Valley Area Hospitals. “She worked hard to bring many advanced medical services to the Gold Country and was a major contributor to the health and well-being of the community. It was tough to find someone who can ably fill her shoes as CEO, but we are confident that Tom is up to the task of carrying on Anne’s legacy.”

When Platt arrived in 2005, Sutter Amador was a beautiful, newly constructed, small rural hospital with limited resources for patients in several medical specialties. She leaves her post having greatly advanced the hospital — adding services that allow residents to receive care locally instead of having to leave the county.

“I care deeply about the health of our residents and the community, but none of this could have been accomplished without the support and generosity of the greater Jackson community and the contributions of an amazing staff of medical professionals,” Platt said. “It has been a pleasure to work with so many to ensure that our residents get the best healthcare right in their own backyard.”    Read More

Patients and Families Enjoy Greater Convenience, Access to Service at Tracy Care Center

Posted on Jan 15, 2019 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images

Community Invited to Celebrate Sutter Facility’s First Year of Service at Open House

TRACY, Calif. – An open house is a time-honored, neighborly tradition. And as a long-time member of the community, Sutter Gould Medical Foundation is inviting residents from across the area to meet clinical care teams and tour the 47,000 square foot Tracy Care Center in celebration of the facility’s first year of high-quality service.

“Our number one goal was to enhance access to services through our Tracy Care Center, which offers greater convenience for our patients and families,” said Gary Zufelt, CEO of Sutter Gould Medical Foundation. “This campus, with the hospital and medical offices right across from each other, has become a real town square of healthcare. It also is a bird’s eye view into the value of Sutter Health’s integrated network—where doctors and nurses, along with other specialists and staff, closely work together to support those in our care.”

The public is invited to the Tracy Care Center at 445 W. Eaton Ave. on Jan. 29 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Visitors can meet with providers and tour the facility, which features a wide array of care services including dermatology, ear, nose and throat, endoscopy, nephrology, neurology, Ob/GYN, orthopedics, podiatry, primary care, pulmonology, and rheumatology. Other convenient services inside the care center include an urgent care center, imaging services with X-ray and ultrasound, a lab with blood draw stations and an injection/shot clinic. Refreshments will also be served at the open house.

“Our open house is meant to be a fun and informal way of connecting with those in the community, a community we are so proud to be a part of,” Steven Mitnick, M.D., chief medical officer for Gould Medical Group. “Healthcare is incredibly personal, and opening our doors and meeting with our neighbors one on one is our privilege. We are excited to show them all the different ways they can access the right care, in the right setting and at the right time on this campus.”

Tracy Care Center Fun Facts

In its first year of service, the Tracy Care Center had:

  • 22 doctors and 53 employees care for 28,414 patients during 128,404 visits
  • Taken 6,345 X-rays and 920 ultrasound images

New Sutter CPMC Van Ness Campus Hospital to Open in the Heart of San Francisco

Posted on Jan 15, 2019 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images

First building in the U.S. to incorporate viscous wall dampers in case of “The Big One”

Smart hospital design merges advanced technology, safety, efficiency and personal touches – such as private rooms – to support the highest quality care

Grand opening on March 2, 2019

SAN FRANCISCO– San Francisco residents will have a modern new hospital at their doorstep. Sutter debuts its new California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital on March 2, 2019. The facility represents a milestone community investment in the health of San Francisco and the first new hospital in the heart of the city in a generation. The state-of-the-art facility, featuring 11 floors and 274 acute-care beds, houses inpatient services with an emphasis on maternity care, pediatrics, orthopedics, transplant, emergency and cardiac care, among other primary care services. Every detail of the new hospital is geared toward creating an inclusive, healing environment, where high quality, technology, safety, efficiency and personal touches will continue to be the norm.

The new, 1 million square-foot California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital, located at 1101 Van Ness Ave. at the intersection of Geary Blvd. in San Francisco.

“For more than 150 years, it has been our privilege to serve every person who calls San Francisco home,” said Warren Browner, M.D., CEO of CPMC. “The opening of Sutter’s CPMC Van Ness Campus provides a new and conveniently located hospital for people living throughout the city and beyond.”

Centrally located along a major arterial thoroughfare

Formerly the site of the Cathedral Hill Hotel, CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital occupies an entire city block between Geary and Post streets along San Francisco’s bustling Van Ness corridor. Across the street from the hospital, a 9-story, 476,000 square-foot medical office building will provide outpatient services, emphasizing the benefit of Sutter Health’s integrated network and its dedication to easily accessible care. The two buildings are connected via an underground tunnel. The medical office building is slated to open in spring 2019.

By the numbers

The 274-bed Sutter CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital consists of close to 1 million square feet of acute care, diagnostic, clinical treatment and administrative space, which includes:

• 60 medical/surgical beds
• 36 intensive care unit beds
• 64 labor/delivery and postpartum beds
• 35 neonatal intensive care unit beds
• 6 antepartum beds
• 25 pediatric beds
• 8 pediatric intensive care unit beds
• 16 operating rooms, including three dedicated to obstetrics
• 30 post-anesthesia care unit beds
• 38 exam/treatment rooms in the 24-hour emergency department, which consists of:
• 31 adult treatment bays and 7 exam/treatment rooms that are dedicated to pediatrics
• All 274 patient rooms are private and feature exterior city or garden views, with an abundance of natural light
• 5 living roof gardens, including a public outdoor terrace

The hospital design, which incorporates a theme of natural materials and touchable artwork, is focused on the well-being of patients, families and the surrounding community. Public spaces, including the main lobby and the Chuck Williams Café, are accessible via the main entrance on Van Ness Ave. The ambulance/patient drop-off area is located off-street under a covered alcove to minimize the impact to traffic, and parking for 435 cars is available beneath the building.

“Our new Sutter CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital will continue to deliver the kind of coordinated, patient-centered quality care that San Francisco expects and deserves from a Sutter facility – with safety, security and inclusive care being paramount with each visit,” said Vernon Giang, M.D., chief medical executive at CPMC.

Shaking things up: CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital makes history with advanced seismic technology

Viscous wall dampers at the new California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital in San Francisco make the facility seismically sound.

Not only is CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital built to meet or exceed California’s stringent seismic laws, but the structure is the first in North America to incorporate innovative viscous wall dampers. Already used extensively in Japan, viscous wall dampers are designed to absorb strong movement during an earthquake, which helps to reduce overall stress on the building itself. This will help the hospital to remain fully operational, with patient care being relatively uninterrupted even after a strong seismic event. The Van Ness Campus hospital incorporates 119 viscous wall dampers.

“In the event of a major disaster, CPMC Van Ness Campus is built to be self-sustaining for at least four days,” said Jim Benney, R.N., senior project manager for the hospital. “We’re prepared to continue regular operations with the support of three emergency generators, food and water.”

Healthy environments foster healthy people

Designed to achieve LEED Silver certification, the hospital was constructed and operates in an environmentally conscious way. Water-saving features include using captured rainwater for the hospital’s five rooftop gardens and high-efficiency, low-flow plumbing fixtures, which will save more than 3 million gallons of water per year.

CPMC Van Ness Campus uses 14 percent less power than the average U.S. hospital in part because 80 percent of patient rooms receive direct natural sunlight. LED bulbs generate more light at lower temperatures, creating less heat in areas like procedural and operating rooms. Additionally, our sophisticated filtration system allows the hospital to deliver 100 percent clean and fresh air.

The public rooftop garden at the new California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital in San Francisco.

A truly integrated healthcare network

The hospital serves as the hub for all consolidated inpatient facilities and outpatient services. When fully complete, the campus will knit together hospital and emergency services, affiliated medical offices and specialty outpatient services – including lots of parking in a tight urban setting.

“Thanks to being part of the Sutter Health integrated network, this new Van Ness Campus hospital was built with the most technologically advanced, patient-focused design details in mind,” said Dr. Browner. “Once open, it will serve as the jewel of the CPMC system.”

Bells and whistles that help accelerate care

CPMC Van Ness Campus uses the latest innovative technologies designed to reduce infection and increase efficiency. For instance:

• AeroScout Hand Hygiene Monitoring technology leverages the hospital’s Wi-Fi infrastructure to automatically identify (via badges) when caregivers sanitize their hands.
• The smart pneumatic tube system works like an underground freeway interchange to deliver medications, samples and supplies throughout the hospital swiftly, safely and securely. Badge-enabled containers keep contents secure, track information and reduce staff time spent transporting samples, supplies and medications between the laboratory, blood bank and pharmacy.

Building a modern hospital beckons a bold design vision and collaborative execution

Imagined as the urban hospital of the future by SmithGroupJJR, the final $2.1 billion project achieves economic, environmental and social sustainability. The building also exemplifies Sutter’s goal of connecting health and the community. Led by general contractor HerreroBOLDT, the hospital broke ground in 2013 and is scheduled to open sooner than similar hospital construction projects. This fast-tracked delivery is attributed to the team’s implementation of the Integrated Project Delivery process. This utilizes a cohesive design and construction approach that keeps costs down and predicts construction challenges ahead of time, so they can be resolved without time-consuming delays.

Connecting Health to Patients and the Community

Sutter’s CPMC campuses support more than 80 non-profit organizations whose work is deeply rooted in the community. The team collaborated with CityBuild Academy, Mission Hiring Hall, City College of San Francisco, San Francisco State University and numerous other community-based hiring partners to optimize the construction process. The project has injected 1,500 new construction jobs and more than $70 million in wages into San Francisco’s economy since 2013.

Nurturing patients extends beyond physical care. When the new CPMC Van Ness Campus opens, patients will enjoy 755 unique and carefully chosen art pieces in a variety of different styles and mediums. Beautiful original paintings in oil and acrylics, vibrant photographs, art pieces created of wood and shaped from clay and metal, large prints bring color, light and beauty to the new hospital’s walls and help create a warm, inviting environment.

11 Things You Didn’t Know About One of the U.S.’s Largest Non-University Kidney Transplant Centers

Posted on Nov 14, 2018 in California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, Quality, Scroll Images

1. The kidney transplant team at Sutter Health’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) transplanted its first kidney in 1969.

2. In March, the program will celebrate its 50th anniversary and move to its new home at the brand new CPMC Van Ness Campus.

3. More than 6,000 people have received life-extending kidney transplants at CPMC. That’s enough to fill 15 jumbo jets!

4. Not for profit Sutter Health’s CPMC is one of the largest non-university medical center transplant programs in the country. Over 200 kidney transplants are performed at CPMC annually, making it one of the largest kidney transplant centers in the western United States.

5. CPMC is a pioneer in kidney paired donation. In 2011, the program made history as the first California transplant program to perform five paired donor transplants in one day. A paired donor transplant is when someone donates their kidney on behalf of a loved one so the loved one can receive a compatible kidney from someone else.

6. A software developer/kidney transplant patient collaborated with his CPMC surgeon to create a groundbreaking software program, called MatchGrid, which allows people who are willing to donate their kidney to a friend or relative but are found incompatible to be paired with a matching patient.

 

 

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