Community Benefit

Young Mother Receives Gift of Surgery

Posted on May 14, 2019 in Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Scroll Images

SANTA ROSA, Calif. –Nancy Arrango, 35, was legally blind for a decade. When she closed her right eye, she couldn’t see anything out of her left. She had a hard time caring for her children, and she lost her ability to drive and to work. But without health insurance, cataract surgery was out of reach.

Late last year, Sutter Santa Rosa Surgery & Endoscopy Center and Operation Access partnered to give Nancy the Gift of Surgery. Sutter Health collaborates with Operation Access and other community health clinics every year to provide surgeries and procedures for uninsured patients based on their medical condition, health status and financial need.

Today, Nancy has a new lease on life.

Capital Public Radio Unveils Plans for New State-of-the-Art Headquarters in Downtown Sacramento

Posted on Apr 30, 2019 in Community Benefit, Scroll Images

Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg and Sacramento City Councilmember Steve Hansen Announce New Headquarters at 8th and J Streets

 

Sutter Health Provides Lead Investment Making Landmark Project Possible

 

Courtesy of Capital Public Radio

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Capital Public Radio today unveiled its plans to move to a new state-of-the-art headquarters in the heart of downtown Sacramento and announced a significant investment from Northern California-based, not-for-profit integrated healthcare system Sutter Health. This collaboration signifies Sutter Health’s and CapRadio’s deep commitment to improving community health by creating a space that will function as both a journalism hub and a center for community engagement.

Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg reveals the Sutter Health Center for Community Engagement during Tuesday’s event.

“We are proud to invest in this landmark project and provide the community with greater access to education, collaboration and community empowerment — important facets of a healthy community,” said Sarah Krevans, president and CEO of Sutter Health. “As an integrated, not-for-profit healthcare system, we have an important mission beyond the walls of our healthcare facilities to improve the overall health and wellbeing of the communities we serve. That’s why we invest in programs including those that provide shelter and resources to those who are homeless, increase access to mental healthcare and enhance our community.”

The new headquarters will be a center for news reporting, healthy civic dialogue and shared community experiences, while also contributing to the vitality and economic health of Sacramento’s downtown area. CapRadio will occupy the 34,000-square-foot facility at Eighth and J streets, allowing the NPR-member station to nearly double its staff to 140 members over time, and adding an estimated $4.8 million in wages per year. Sutter Health’s $2.25 million investment for CapRadio’s new headquarters will include the construction of the Sutter Health Center for Community Engagement, which has the capacity to host up to 220 people and as many 300 events per year, generating a potential economic impact of approximately $1.5 million for surrounding businesses in the area.

“With our move, we will add to the vitality and economic health of downtown Sacramento and we will be able to expand on our mission to inspire listeners to look at the world from multiple perspectives, learn from diverse audiences and engage our communities more broadly,” said Rick Eytcheson, president and general manager of Capital Public Radio. “We applaud Sutter Health’s recognition that our shared responsibility includes nurturing the mind and spirit, as well as the body. Sutter Health’s significant investment is making this move a reality, I couldn’t be more thrilled to work with such a committed community partner.”

CapRadio is licensed to California State University, Sacramento and is housed on the campus. Construction on the new downtown headquarters is slated to begin in late 2019 and is scheduled for completion in mid-2020.

Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg and Sacramento City Councilmember Steve Hansen helped celebrate the announcement at an event that featured a performance by the Sacramento Mandarins drumline, a banner drop to reveal a life-sized image of the entry to the Sutter Health Center for Community Engagement, and more than 100 guests.

“I am excited about this investment and not just because it is in my hometown. This investment reaches far beyond Sacramento and will have positive impacts for our democracy and freedom of expression,” said Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis.

“Strong, credible journalism is crucial to our city and region, and I’m thrilled that Sutter Health’s investment will allow CapRadio to expand its coverage and be in the heart of downtown. This new center will also provide members of our diverse community a place to stay informed and achieve greater common understanding,” said Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg.

“This state-of-the-art headquarters will soon be a destination that will add vitality to our city’s heart and support the creative economy of Sacramento’s downtown and our larger region,” said Sacramento City Councilman Steve Hansen. “As a CapRadio member, I’m elated to see the station put roots in our central city, which is at the crossroads of state and local news. Public radio continues to be the cornerstone of an informed public, and this new headquarters will be a beacon of civic engagement for the community.”

Changing the Face of Healthcare

Posted on Apr 2, 2019 in Community Benefit, Scroll Images

Memorial Medical Center CEO Gino Patrizio, Executive Director of Philanthropy for Sutter Health Valley Area Lisa Hume and Director of External Affairs for Sutter Health Valley Area Holly Harper report out about how their collective efforts support the Stanislaus County community.

MODESTO, Calif.–People may think of healthcare in terms of exam rooms and lab coats, stethoscopes and tongue depressors. Today, healthcare’s modern look features kids fitness classes, donations of healthy food items through mobile food banks or linking the homeless to wrap-around services like housing support, mental health services or addiction counseling.

The image of healthcare is changing—thanks to the teamwork between Sutter and various organizations in our Northern California communities.

During a recent gathering in Modesto, Memorial Medical Center CEO Gino Patrizio and Holly Harper, Sutter Health’s Director of External Affairs in the Valley, talked about how the health of our patients hinges on the health and well-being of their community. They hit on some highlights of how efforts inside and outside hospital and clinic walls supported the greater Stanislaus County in 2018:

  • In partnership with Sutter Health, Golden Valley Health Center’s Street Medicine Program delivers care to those who need it most. Last year, the street medicine program.
    • Served 2,083 individuals experiencing homelessness
    • Conducted 582 nurse assessments
    • Scheduled 70 primary care appointments
  • With support from Sutter Health, Second Harvest’s Mobile Fresh for Kids program made a tremendous impact at Shackelford Elementary School in the first half of 2018:
    • Served 651 children and youth
    • Distributed 48,503 pounds of food and 5,859 nutrition education handouts
    • More than half of parents whose children participated reported increased nutritional knowledge and preparation of healthier meals

Overall, Sutter invested more than $56 million to the underserved through charity care, unreimbursed costs of Medi-Cal and other community benefit support in 2018. This included nearly $1.1 million toward community partnerships that improve the quality of life for those in Stanislaus County. Working with 15 community partners, the programs served more than 43,000 adults and youth in neighborhoods throughout Modesto and all of Stanislaus County. Additionally, it provided more than 104,000 services to the community, including primary care appointments, school wellness activities, transportation and more

“With our community partners, we are always looking for innovative ways to expand access to care, helping to link patients to critical health and social services,” said Harper.  “We couldn’t do this without the help of community partners and feel fortunate to have the opportunity to collaborate with such innovative, creative and dedicated individuals, who are all working toward common goals.”

Many of the community investments stem from direct feedback from residents. Every three years, Sutter Health conducts Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNA) to determine the unique needs and challenges for each community Sutter supports and serves. Using both qualitative and quantitative data collection and focus groups, the CHNA report helps us identify this region’s communities of concern by zip code and the health needs of highest priority. The 2019 CHNA is now underway across Sutter Health.

For more information about Sutter’s investment into Northern California communities, visit Sutter Health’s Community Benefit page.

Real-Life Experience without Real-Life Risk

Posted on Mar 25, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Community Benefit, Eden Medical Center, Scroll Images

Eden Trauma Team Teaches Teens about the Dangers of Drinking and Driving

 

CASTRO VALLEY, Calif. – Every 15 minutes someone dies in an alcohol-related car accident. That was the statistic in 1995 when a program called Every 15 Minutes was first adopted by the California Highway Patrol (CHP) to give teens a real-life look at the dangers of drinking and driving.

Thankfully, fewer people die from alcohol-related car accidents these days, but drinking and driving by young people remains a problem—often because teens’ feelings of invincibility can lead to poor decision making.

Eden Medical Center trauma nurses apply moulage makeup to Every 15 Minutes car student accident “victims.”

To encourage teens to think about the consequences of their actions and to prevent alcohol-related car accidents, Sutter’s Eden Medical Center, the regional trauma center for southern Alameda County, has participated in the Every 15 Minutes program for the past 14 years.

The program offers real-life experience without real-life risk. Eden’s trauma nurses apply moulage makeup (mock injuries)

to the accident ‘victims’ to make them appear genuinely injured. Nurses, doctors, anesthesiologists, respiratory therapists and laboratory and radiology technicians from Eden’s trauma team work with public agencies, community organizations and local businesses to create a simulated traffic collision followed by rescue workers transporting “injured” students to Eden’s emergency department. The drama is videotaped and shared with students at a school assembly staged to look like a memorial service for the car crash “victims.”

Watch the 2019 Amador, Dublin and San Leandro high school student videos featuring Eden trauma team staff on YouTube.

Each Every 15 Minutes exercise, which takes place over two days, also involves the “living dead” –students who are removed from classrooms at 15-minute intervals to dramatize the toll of drunk driving. At an overnight retreat, students are taught strategies for making good decisions and learn how to be champions for not drinking and driving.

CALSTAR, Sutter Health’s air medical transport partner, arrives to transport student “victims” to Eden.

Says Eden’s trauma injury prevention specialist Pam Stoker, “From a training standpoint, Every 15 Minutes exercises are an excellent opportunity for our staff to run through a trauma in a practice situation. It’s not real, but they treat it as if it is, so it’s an opportunity for them to assess their skills and ask themselves how they could improve.”

“It’s also great for our trauma team from a morale standpoint,” Stoker continues, “Being part of prevention efforts is really important for the staff because they deal with the aftermath of tragic real-life alcohol-related accidents all the time. This is a way for them to try and make a difference in the community by working to prevent accidents before they happen.”

Eden’s trauma team helps run two Every 15 Minutes programs for local high schools each year, most recently for San Leandro High School and Amador High School in Pleasanton.

Every 15 Minutes student accident “victim” arrives at Eden Medical Center’s heliport.

Participants in the recent programs included the Alameda County Fire Department, Alameda County Sheriff’s Office Coroner’s Bureau and Court Services, The Braddock Foundation, California Highway Patrol, CALSTAR (the Air Medical Transport Provider for Sutter Health), Eden Medical Center Philanthropy, Paramedics Plus, Royal Ambulance, San Leandro Police Department and Santos-Robinson Mortuary.

“To see our own peers on stage, in the film, and act out the crash scene is incredibly powerful. We are able to see people we know and love, people we relate to, demonstrating the consequences of driving under the influence,” said San Leandro High School student, Lily Alvarez.

 

 

Spotting the Signs: Sutter Health Athletic Trainers Address Student Concussions

Posted on Mar 12, 2019 in Affiliates, Community Benefit, Novato Community Hospital, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Novato, Calif — New research studies on concussions have shown that left untreated, they can cause serious long-term health problems—a frightening prospect for student athletes and their families. In 2014, Novato Community Hospital (NCH) and Novato Unified School District came together to help. They teamed up to improve concussion detection and injury prevention for the district’s more than 1,600 student athletes across 21 different sports. The result was the NCH Athletic Trainer Program.

Designed by the NCH Orthopedics Department and supervised by the department chief, the program takes a holistic approach to safeguard the health and safety of student athletes. Launched in 2015, it funds two full-time certified athletic trainers, one at San Marin High School and one at Novato High School, who work with students on a daily basis, attending all practice sessions and games where high-impact sports are played. “The certified athletic trainers are healthcare professionals that are educated on and experienced in the evaluation and management of athletic injuries, including concussions,” said Jennifer Lehr, director of orthopedic services at NCH.

 

The trainers identified concussion symptoms in 47 local student athletes in 2017, all of whom needed to see a doctor. “Without this intervention, they may have continued on the field, risking permanent injury,” said Steven Dehart, the certified athletic trainer at San Marin High School.

In addition to in-the-moment concussion assessment, the certified athletic trainers also conduct extremely detailed computer-based pre-injury concussion testing at the start of every school year to establish each student’s unique brain-health baseline. Later in the year, if a concussion occurs during practice or play, the severity of injury can be objectively measured to provide information vital to medical treatment.

Finally, the certified athletic trainers provide student athletes and school coaches with basic sports medicine training, including how to avoid common bone, joint and muscular-skeletal injuries. “We really focus on injury prevention,” Lehr said. “The ultimate goal is to enhance the student-athlete experience and establish good habits now for lifelong health and well-being.”

The Athletic Trainer Program is made possible through the support of the community. The Novato Community Hospital Foundation funds a portion of the program and donors have supported the purchase and licensing of the computer-based pre-injury concussion testing software, as well as a portion of the salaries for the certified athletic trainers. In addition, donations covered the cost of advanced software the radiologists at NCH needed to conduct susceptibility weighted imaging during an MRI, which can more precisely diagnose brain injuries. Novato Community Hospital covers the remainder of program costs through community benefit investments. The Novato Unified School District provides oversight, infrastructure and acts as the first point of contact with parents.

Sutter Health Valley Area Renews Commitment to Placer County Homeless

Posted on Jan 8, 2019 in Community Benefit, Scroll Images

Whole Person Care program receives additional $1 million for housing

From a County of Placer Press Release

AUBURN, Calif. — The Placer County Board of Supervisors approved a $1 million contribution from Sutter Health Valley Area today to benefit the county’s Whole Person Care program in 2019. This is the second such investment made by Sutter Health to purchase permanent housing units and rental subsidies for participants in the Whole Person Care program who are experiencing homelessness and often grappling with complex medical and social challenges.

“Sutter’s support has been crucial to our success in housing more than 85 people so far, and their continued collaboration will help Whole Person Care make an even deeper impact,” said Placer County Health Officer Dr. Rob Oldham. “Placing homeless individuals can be challenging in our housing market, but we’ve been able to meet these challenges with creativity and collaborative relationships.”

Sutter Health has supported the Whole Person Care program since Placer County was selected by the California Department of Health Care Services in 2016 to participate in the pilot, which includes a match in federal dollars of up to $10 million over five years. The program is designed to bring multiple agencies together, including hospitals, federally qualified health centers, government and nonprofit service providers to coordinate and deliver services to meet the needs of high-risk, high-needs individuals, with a specific focus on persons who are experiencing homelessness.

“As a not-for-profit health system in Placer County, we are committed to improving access to care for the underserved, including not only our patients but all residents in the area,” said Brian Alexander, CEO of Sutter Roseville Medical Center. “Whole Person Care has facilitated unmatched partnership among government, hospitals and nonprofits in this region and we’ve been able to accomplish much more working together.”

Using Sutter Health’s initial $1 million contribution in 2016, Placer County was able to purchase two properties with a total of 14 bedrooms and provide permanent housing for 14 people at a time during the first year. This second investment will allow Placer County to obtain additional housing units to complement the mental health, substance abuse and supportive services provided through the Whole Person Care program.

To learn more about Whole Person Care, explore this in-depth podcast series following the journeys of members and their case workers – including clients who have moved into the properties purchased with Sutter grant funding.

The grant from Sutter Health is part of the health system’s Getting to Zero strategy, a regional effort to end chronic homelessness in Placer, Sacramento and Yolo counties by encouraging public and private sector collaboration on innovative housing projects. This year marks the final phase of the three-year campaign, during which Sutter Health has invested more than $5 million in four local jurisdictions to provide housing for over 1,000 individuals.

“We strive to improve lives beyond the walls of our hospitals and care centers by addressing the whole health of each individual,” said Mitch Hanna, CEO of Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital. “We know that access to housing is a necessary component to improve an individual’s overall health, and our partnership with Placer County will help meet the community’s pressing need for more housing.”