Community Benefit

COVID-19 Heightens our Love for Mother Earth, and One Another

Posted on Apr 22, 2020 in Community Benefit, Innovation, People, Quality, Safety, Scroll Images, Transformation, Uncategorized

A message from Stephen H. Lockhart, M.D., Ph.D., Sutter Health Chief Medical Officer and Executive Sponsor of Sutter Health’s Environmental Stewardship Program

With fewer cars on the road and less traffic in the skies, some news outlets have reported a climate benefit. While none of us wanted this short-term positive effect at such high health and economic costs, we are getting a peek at an environment with less human interference — a brief glimpse at what could be possible if we took steps to reduce waste and advance alternative energy solutions in the years ahead.

As champions of health, we know that nature holds a special place in our lives, supporting our mental and physical wellbeing. It’s never been more important to take a walk outside, take a deep breath, enjoy the sunshine and wave at our neighbors — all while staying 6 feet apart, of course. Nature lifts our spirits and helps restore our hope.

Please join our Sutter team in celebrating the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Mobilizing to care for our planet over the long term is one more way we’re showing our love for our communities and one another.

Here are a few ways you and your family can get involved with Sutter’s sustainability efforts:

1. Plant a garden. Digging your hands in the soil is good for your health. Welcome spring by planting native plants, fruits and vegetables. Take it a step further by starting a compost pile. Composting food waste reduces the amount of waste you send to a landfill, and once it fully decomposes, you’re left with a fertilizer for your garden. Check out some simple tips on composting from the EPA.

2. Donate clothing. While spring cleaning, consider donating unwanted items rather than throwing them away. Each year, nearly 40,000 gallons of water are used in the production and transport of new clothes bought by the average American household.

3. Watch creativity grow. Promote your kids’ love for our planet by encouraging them to create art from natural or recycled materials.

4. Conserve water. Install a low-flow shower head to reduce water use. In one year, a family of four can save up to 18,200 gallons of water.

5. Carry a reusable water bottle. Lessen your environmental impact by replacing your single-use plastic bottles with a stainless-steel water bottle or travel mug.

6. Calculate your carbon footprint. Simply reducing the amount of time we spend running errands, driving to work and to other activities plays a significant role in reducing our carbon footprint. Check out the EPA’s Carbon Footprint Calculator.

7. Learn about sustainability efforts at Sutter Health. Did you know that Sutter completed five solar-power projects; launched a pilot program to reduce the amount of harmful anesthetic gasses released into the atmosphere during surgeries; and increased plant-based meals by 20% in our 24 hospital cafeterias? You can find out more here.

How a Pandemic Launched a NorCal Healthcare System

Posted on Apr 14, 2020 in Carousel, Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Innovation, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation, Uncategorized

Spanish Flu
A nurse takes a patient’s pulse in the influenza ward at Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 1, 1918. Photo courtesy of Library of Congress.

The pandemic started slowly in Sacramento. For weeks, residents of the city believed what was going around was just the usual flu that arrived every fall. But in just two months, thousands in the city had been infected and about 500 Sacramentans were dead.

That happened a century ago. Because of the inadequacy of the existing Sacramento hospitals to care for the numerous victims of the Spanish flu in 1918, local doctors and civic leaders banded together to build a new, more modern hospital to meet the growing city’s needs.

Sutter Health was born.

Begun as a single Sutter Hospital kitty-corner to Sutter’s Fort, Sutter Health now has a presence in 22 counties across Northern California, featuring thousands of doctors and allied clinical providers and more than 50,000 employees. As an integrated health system, Sutter is uniquely qualified and capable to care for residents during a health crisis such as COVID-19.

“A group of hospitals and doctor’s offices are able to band together, share resources, skills and knowledge, and institute best practices to care more effectively and efficiently for our patients and the communities we serve,” said Dave Cheney, the interim president and CEO of Sutter Valley Area Hospitals and the CEO of Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento. “We have systems in place that we test all the time to ensure we are prepared for many crises, including a pandemic like COVID-19.”

Groudbreaking
Just a few years after the devastating Spanish flu, Sacramento physicians, nurses and civic leaders gathered to break ground in 1922 for the first Sutter Hospital.

Physicians Fill a Need in Sacramento

The deadly influenza commonly called Spanish flu killed about 50 million worldwide. From August 1918 to July 1919, 20 million Americans became sick and more than 500,000 died, 13,340 of them in California. In Sacramento, slow action by the city public health office delayed care and, within a couple of weeks, sick residents flooded the hospitals. The city library was even converted into a makeshift hospital. A Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento history recounts: 

“The influenza epidemic of 1918 gave convincing evidence to Sacramento doctors that the city’s two major hospitals were woefully inadequate to provide the health care services vital to the rapidly growing community. The flu epidemic had sorely taxed these facilities and highlighted the need for a modern, fireproof hospital. Recognizing the critical need for hospital care for their patients, 17 local physicians came together with civic leaders to create a new hospital.”

The group incorporated as Sutter Hospital Association in 1921, naming it after its neighbor, Sutter’s Fort, which cared for Gold Rush pioneers as Sacramento’s first hospital. The first Sutter Hospital was built two years later and opened in December 1923 as “the most modern hospital to be found in the state,” according to The Sacramento Bee. It was the first private, non-sectarian hospital in the city, and the first to offer private rooms.

The hospital became not-for-profit in 1935 and changed its name to Sutter General Hospital. It opened Sutter Maternity Hospital in 1937 two miles away and it soon expanded its services and was renamed Sutter Memorial Hospital. In the 1980s, the old Sutter General Hospital was replaced by a modern facility across the street from Sutter’s Fort, and in 2015 all adult and pediatric services were combined under one roof when the Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center opened essentially in the same location as the original Sutter Hospital.

First Sutter Hospital
The first Sutter Hospital opened in December 1923 as California’s “most modern hospital.” Now, Sutter Health is an integrated healthcare system that includes 24 hospitals in Northern California.

A Health Network Grows

The 1980s and 1990s saw tremendous growth for Sutter. Struggling community hospitals in Roseville, Auburn, Jackson, Davis, Modesto and other nearby cities merged with what was then known as Sutter Community Hospitals. Then came the deal that more than doubled the healthcare system. In 1996, Sutter Community Hospitals merged with a group of Bay Area hospitals and physician groups known as California Healthcare System. These included such large, well-respected, historic hospitals as California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco and Alta Bates in the East Bay. This new system became, simply, Sutter Health.

Now as a model of healthcare integration, Sutter Health provides a user-friendly system centered around patient care — a system that offers greater access to quality healthcare while holding the line on costs. This connectivity allows Sutter teams to provide innovative, high-quality and life-saving care to more than 3 million Californians. Sutter’s integrated care model allows care teams and care locations to use the power of the network to share ideas, technologies and best practices, ultimately providing better care and a user-friendly experience, achieving healthier patient outcomes and reducing costs.

Our Heroes Wear Scrubs
Grateful community members are thanking Sutter Health front-line workers throughout Northern California.

An Integrated Network Fights COVID-19

Today, Sutter Health’s hospitals and physician groups don’t operate in a vacuum. Each hospital is supported by a larger system that can share knowledge and send materials, equipment and even manpower to where they are needed most. The system is called the Sutter Health Emergency Management System, which is organized after the federal government’s National Incident Command System.

Here’s how it works: Part of the Sutter Health Emergency Management System is a team throughout the network that works on gathering and purchasing the necessary supplies and equipment needed during this pandemic, including N95 masks and ventilators. Another team monitors bed space to ensure that each hospital can care for a COVID-19 patient surge. Clinical team members across the network are working together to address any issues that may unfold and to share best practices as they treat coronavirus patients.

That’s the power of a not-for-profit, integrated healthcare network.

“We are leveraging the strength of our united teams to increase our capacity and knowledge, and to provide the necessary equipment,” Cheney said. “We are preparing all of our network hospitals in the event we see a surge in patients due to COVID-19. Thanks to the integrated system that has been more than 100 years in the making, we are prepared for a pandemic of this magnitude now more than ever.”

Could an Experimental Drug Studied for Ebola Work Against COVID-19?

Posted on Apr 8, 2020 in Affiliates, California Pacific Medical Center, Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Innovation, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital

Not-for-profit Sutter Health Launches Clinical Trials with Gilead Sciences

clinical trials for Covid-19

Sutter Health, together with health systems across Northern California has teamed up with Foster City-based Gilead Sciences on clinical trials for a promising treatment for COVID-19. The COVID-19 vaccine is at least a year away and now scientists across the globe are investigating existing medicines that might work as treatments.

In April 2020, Sutter began participating in two of Gilead Sciences’ Phase 3, randomized clinical trials to evaluate the use of the company’s drug, remdesivir, in adults diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

The studies test the clinical efficacy and safety of remdesivir in patients with moderate or severe COVID-19, compared with standard-of-care treatment. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviews results from Phase 3 trials when considering a drug approval.

Promising Treatment
Remdesivir is an antiviral, intravenous drug made by Gilead Sciences. It’s been available as an experimental compound for years, but has not been approved by the FDA for use in clinical treatment.

Jamey Schmidt, Director of Clinical Research at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), quickly saw the potential benefit to patients in partnering drug manufacturers (in this case, Gilead Sciences) with Sutter researchers and physicians skilled in clinical trial start-up and ready to help tackle the infectious disease outbreak.

“Sutter research is committed to bring this investigational treatment to Sutter physicians caring for patients infected with the novel coronavirus,” says Schmidt, who collaborated with Greg Tranah, Ph.D., CPMC’s Scientific Director, and Jennifer Ling, M.D., infectious disease specialist at CPMC and principal investigator of the remdesivir clinical trials at CPMC.

CPMC, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, Sutter Roseville Medical Center and Sutter Medical Center Sacramento are participating in the clinical trials of remdesivir, and other Sutter sites may enroll to the studies later this month.

“In response to this global health crisis, we’re proud that Sutter is helping lead efforts across Northern California and seeking new tools to combat this novel infection and lessen the virus’s impact,” says Dr. Ling. “Through research at Sutter, new discoveries will help determine the potential of remdesivir to help individual patients with COVID-19.”

Some patients who have been infected by the novel coronavirus and are severely ill may not meet the study criteria for enrollment in the clinical trials of remdesivir. Instead, they may qualify for treatment via Gilead Sciences’ expanded access program (EAP) for remdesivir. The EAP provides alternative access to the investigational drug for severely ill patients with COVID-19 who do not meet the clinical trials study criteria.

First developed in 2009 and used during the Ebola outbreak in 2014, remdesivir is being studied in multiple clinical trials worldwide to see if it is safe and effective against the coronavirus in humans. The drug was previously tested in animals infected by other coronaviruses like SARS and MERS, and is now being tested in humans to determine if it can reduce the intensity and duration of COVID-19.

“Research at Sutter is helping deliver safe, high-quality care to our patients during this unprecedented pandemic,” says Leon Clark, Vice President, Chief Research and Health Equity Officer, Sutter Health. “By bringing innovation to the forefront of how we can best care for Sutter patients who acquire COVID-19, Sutter’s talented researchers are stepping up to the challenge presented by this global health crisis.”

April 29 Update:
Results from a clinical trial of remdesivir, an antiviral manufactured by Gilead Sciences, led by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) were reported April 29, 2020. The findings suggest that hospitalized patients with advanced COVID-19 and lung involvement who received remdesivir recovered faster than patients who received placebo, according to a preliminary data analysis from a randomized, controlled trial involving 1063 patients. The trial (known as the Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial, or ACTT), sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the NIH, was the first clinical trial launched in the United States to evaluate remdesivir as an experimental treatment for COVID-19.

Additionally, Gilead Sciences also shared preliminary results today from the company’s open-label, Phase 3 SIMPLE trial evaluating five- and 10-day dosing durations of remdesivir in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. The study results demonstrated that patients receiving a 10-day treatment course of remdesivir achieved similar improvement in clinical status compared with those patients who were administered a five-day treatment course of the drug.

Sutter is not participating in the ACTT treatment trial nor the SIMPLE clinical trial. However, as described in the above article posted on April 8, Sutter is participating in the two Phase 3, randomized, controlled clinical trials that are testing remdesivir. Gilead Sciences has not yet disclosed when results of these clinical trials will be published. Clinical trials at Sutter testing investigational use of remdesivir will close to enrollment May 29, 2020.

May 4 Update:
On May 1, 2020, remdesivir received FDA Emergency Use Authorization for the treatment of COVID-19. The authorization enables the potential use of remdesivir to treat hospitalized patients suffering from severe COVID-19 disease in the U.S., outside of the context of an established clinical trial of the drug. Based on patients’ severity of disease, the authorization allows for five- and 10-day treatment durations.

Learn more about Sutter research and clinical trials.



Special Delivery: Mobile Clinic Brings Healthcare to S.F.’s Homeless

Posted on Apr 7, 2020 in California Pacific Medical Center, Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO—Imagine if you were ordered to shelter in place and your only option was a homeless shelter. How would you get care for your existing health conditions?

For low-income or homeless people who live in San Francisco’s Tenderloin neighborhood, the coronavirus outbreak is making what was already a difficult situation even more challenging. Fortunately for Tracey Gamedah, who suffers from mobility issues due to high blood pressure and congestive heart failure, the recently-launched HealthRIGHT 360 Mobile Healthcare Service brings the primary care she needs to her neighborhood, close to the women’s shelter where she is staying.

Watch Tracey Gamedah’s story:

“Sutter Health provided tremendous financial support to launch the medical mobile van and bring medical service to the vulnerable population right here on the streets of San Francisco,” says HealthRIGHT 360’s Stephanie Yeh, P.A., who cares for Gamedah.

Says Gamedah, “You can’t give up hope. I just knew that if I kept going that I would find help and I found it when I saw that truck outside.”

The HealthRIGHT 360 Mobile Healthcare Service is a collaborative effort with major support from Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC). Read more.

COVID-19: Sutter Health Receives Supply Donations – How to Help

Posted on Apr 3, 2020 in Community Benefit, Safety, Scroll Images, Uncategorized, Wellness

As Sutter Health, caregivers and staff work tirelessly to respond to the coronavirus (COVID-19) and meet the needs of our patients across the network, an outpouring of support from the community, businesses and other generous partners has flooded in.

“We are so incredibly grateful for the donations and support we’ve received from people and organizations who want to help our frontline staff during these very challenging circumstances,” said Rishi Sikka, Sutter Health’s President of System Enterprises. “We are so proud of the heroic work they’re doing.”

New and protective N95 respirators and medical face masks, and thousands of new and reusable protective gowns are among the received and incoming supplies. Additionally, corporate foundations are acting quickly to donate thousands of iPads to help enable even more of our physicians to conduct video visits.

Other donors are finding more personal ways to demonstrate their gratitude. For example, Trader Joe’s donated grocery bags of food and flowers for frontline medical staff, a local business sent pizzas to help feed the staff, a flower wholesaler delivered fresh flowers around the entrance and on cars at one of Sutter’s hospitals as a way to thank the care providers – and grateful community members have created chalk art messages of appreciation on Sutter hospital sidewalks.

Sutter’s Supply Chain team also is working around the clock to acquire new products and equipment from as many sources as possible. As a result, despite the challenging and rapidly evolving environment, Sutter has been able to maintain a steady stream of supplies and distribute them across our system to where they are needed most, soit can keep patients and staff safe while prioritizing effective use of personalprotection equipment (PPE).

Currently, the donation areas of biggest need across the U.S. and at Sutter Health are:

  • Personal protective equipment—equipment such as N95 respirators and surgical or procedure masks in new and original packaging to help ensure supplies are safe and medical grade.
  • Blood product donations, which are essential to community health. Donations for blood have declined as many people have been staying home during the coronavirus outbreak. The Red Cross and Vitalant are seeking healthy individuals to donate blood. Visit redcross.org or vitalant.org to make an appointment to donate.

To make learn more about making a donation to Sutter Health and what supplies are needed, please visit the donations web page.

Live Oak Health and Housing Campus Moves Closer to Reality

Posted on Mar 6, 2020 in Carousel, Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Sutter Maternity and Surgery Center, Santa Cruz, Uncategorized, Wellness

Courtesy of Santa Cruz Community Health and Dientes Community Dental Care.

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. — Santa Cruz Community Health (SCCH) and Dientes Community Dental Care (Dientes), today announced a $1 million dollar investment from Sutter Health to support the construction and operation of a 19,000-square-foot medical clinic to be run by SCCH and 11,000-square-foot dental clinic to be run by Dientes on the future site of a health and housing campus that will benefit the Live Oak community.

Rendering of the Santa Cruz Community Health medical clinic.

An Investment in Infrastructure

The future site of the health and housing campus is the ideal location for much-needed services. Supervisor John Leopold notes, “Five years ago there were no medical offices in Live Oak. A community of our size needs good access to medical and dental services and housing that is affordable to all families. This new development will help everyone in the community from small children to families to seniors.” The campus – the first of its kind in Santa Cruz County – will integrate the strengths and services of its three owners:

  • SCCH has been serving the medical and mental health needs of underserved Santa Cruz County residents since 1980, with a special focus on families.
  • Dientes has an over 25-year track record of providing affordable, high-quality and comprehensive dental care through three existing clinics and an outreach program.
  • MidPen Housing, already owns and manages 13 affordable housing communities in Santa Cruz County, providing residents with supportive services.

“Planning for this project started in 2017, and I’m so pleased we are starting to secure large contributions that will make construction possible,” said Dientes CEO Laura Marcus. “Sutter Health has a proven track record of improving the health in this region, so it was no surprise that the not-for-profit system that includes Palo Alto Medical Foundation stepped up to help. This is truly a remarkable demonstration of how we can collaborate for the overall good of our community.”

Sutter Health has committed $1 million dollars, over five years, to the construction and operation of both clinics on the campus. SCCH will receive $160,000 and Dientes will receive $40,000 each year through 2023.

“As a not-for-profit health network, Sutter focuses on improving the health of those inside and outside the walls of our hospitals and care centers,” said Stephen Gray, chief administrative officer for Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center of Santa Cruz and operations executive of Palo Alto Medical Foundation Santa Cruz. “We know that when people have access to preventive screening and routine healthcare, their health improves. This investment builds on Sutter’s commitment to improve the health of the entire community we serve.”

Rendering of the Dientes Community Dental Care dental clinic.

Capital Campaign is Ongoing

“Projects like this one can transform communities. This initiative will bring affordable healthcare and housing to the heart of Live Oak – providing a lifeline to families, adults and seniors,” said SCCH CEO Leslie Conner. “We hope the early funding we’ve secured will be a catalyst for more donations in the coming weeks and months.”

The integrated, state-of-the-art health and housing campus will address a triple-goal of increasing access to healthcare, growing affordable housing, and creating economic opportunity. The project will provide health services to 10,000 patients annually and affordable housing for 57 households. In addition, it will create more than 60 new jobs.

Dientes and Santa Cruz Community Health will break ground on their clinic in 2020 and open in 2021. MidPen will break ground on the housing component in 2021 and open in 2022.

Renderings, photos and more information about the project is available here