Community Benefit

From Sidewalk to Services: Working Together to Shelter Homeless People in Oakland

Posted on Jul 3, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Community Benefit, Scroll Images

Sutter Supports ‘Community Cabins’ to Offer Safer and Healthier Respite from the Streets

 

OAKLAND, Calif. –Sutter Health and Alta Bates Summit Medical Center representatives today joined with Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf, Emeryville Mayor Ally Medina, state and local government officials, and other community partners including Home Depot, Target and the Oakland Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, to announce the opening of the city of Oakland’s fifth Community Cabin site. The new site, which will house 76 unsheltered people, is located on Caltrans property near the West Oakland/Emeryville border on Mandela Parkway.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf announces the Mandela Parkway Community Cabin site opening

Sutter and Alta Bates Summit are committed to improving the health and wellness of the community by investing in innovative solutions and collaborative partnerships. Together, they have contributed nearly a half million dollars in community health grants to support the city of Oakland’s initiative to help move homeless people from encampments into temporary shelters. The Mandela Parkway Community Cabin site is the fifth such site in Oakland to which Sutter and Alta Bates Summit have provided monetary support over the past couple of years.

According to Mayor Schaaf, there are roughly 3,000 unsheltered people living on the streets of Oakland—the majority of whom are long-term Oakland residents.

Community Cabin sites are an emergency intervention designed to serve as a temporary bridge from the sidewalk to services, from the street to housing. At the Community Cabin sites, people in need are connected to health services including healthcare, mental health and addiction recovery services, wrap-around social services, public benefits and other resources to help them end their unsheltered status. The Community Cabin sites are designed to increase people’s health, stability, dignity and safety while service providers work intensively to help end their unsheltered status.

One of the new Community Cabins at a new site to temporarily house unsheltered people in Oakland

“What is unique about this model is that we’re offering people privacy and security,” Mayor Schaaf said. “They know their possessions are securely stored and they have onsite navigators to help them toward full employment as well as permanent housing.

As of the end of June 2019, the four exiting Community Cabins sites have served 350 individuals and are currently serving 104 people. Sixty-seven percent of all exits from the Community Cabins to date have been positive (167 of 250 exits), meaning program participants end their unsheltered status by moving into permanent housing, shelter placement, or reunification with friends and family.

 

 

 

‘People Back Home Really Care’

Posted on Jun 7, 2019 in Community Benefit, Scroll Images

KCRA Interviews Chris Faeh, Sutter Health Technical Services operations director and U.S. Air Force veteran, during the Operation Care Package drop-off at the Roseville Automall.

Sutter Teammates Join the Ranks of those who Support Active Military and Veterans through Operation Care Package

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Getting up early this morning—3:15 a.m., to be exact—is hardly a sacrifice when it comes with an opportunity to give back.

When Chris Faeh was serving in the Air Force, there weren’t any “typical” days, but many of them started in the wee hours where he was fixing or testing equipment or joining a convoy vehicles and beginning a mission. Today, he joined his Sutter colleagues to drop off donated supplies to military members at home and abroad as part of Operation Care Package. From beef jerky and powdered drink packets, to bar soap and shampoo, Sutter team members from across the Valley filled bins and boxes to the brim.

As part of a broader commitment to support military personnel, their families and veterans, not-for-profit Sutter Health teamed up with the Red Cross Gold Country Region for a sixth year to deliver the supplies to the official Operation Care Package donation site, the Roseville Automall.

“As a veteran of the Air Force, I can tell you that ‘mail day’ is a day we look forward to the most. When we’d get boxes of supplies, it lifted our spirits. It showed us that people back home really care,” said Faeh, who currently serves as an operations director for Sutter Health’s Technical Services Department. “I’m so proud to work for an organization that values our military men and women overseas.”

The Sutter Health Operation Care Package morning delivery crew takes a well-earned break after offloading supplies from their trucks. L to R, Ed Brooks, Doug Angrove, Chris Faeh, Leah Soos and Ed Fabi.

Sutter’s Ongoing Commitment to Veterans

Sutter Health greatly values the contributions military veterans provide—to the United States as well as to its network. Sutter created a Military and Veterans Inclusion Resource Group to support members of the military, veterans and their friends and family. Sutter Health collaborates with the Employment Development Department to promote jobs for military members seeking employment. Additionally, the healthcare organization’s military recruitment efforts include participation in military career fairs and posting to online military job boards. Sutter Health also teamed up with Veteran Jobs Mission, a national organization committed to employing and mentoring veterans.

Sutter Health employs approximately 1,400 veterans and reservists.

 

Davis Community Meals and Housing Announces Funding and Support for Paul’s Place, a First-of-its-Kind Vertical Tiny Home Village to Serve Unsheltered in our Community

Posted on Jun 5, 2019 in Community Benefit, Scroll Images

Sutter Health Valley Area Board Member Helen Thomson, Sutter Health COO James Conforti, Sutter Health Valley Area Vice President of External Affairs Keri Thomas and Sutter Davis Hospital CEO Rachael McKinney celebrate another milestone achieved for Paul’s Place by the Davis community.

Innovative Multi-Use Building Designed by Local Architect and Supported by Davis Opportunity Village

Local Business and Community Leaders Raise Nearly $2 Million to Meet $2.5 Million Matching Investment from Sutter Health

Courtesy of Davis Community Meals and Housing

DAVIS, Calif.–In a celebration acknowledging years of planning, design, review and outreach, the nonprofit Davis Community Meals and Housing (DCMH) today announced the greater Davis community has raised more than $4 million of the estimated $5 million cost to replace its dilapidated building at 1111 H Street with Paul’s Place, a new innovative, multi-functional facility, designed by a local architect. Paul’s Place will provide day services, critical health and human resources, emergency shelter, transitional housing, and permanent supportive housing to people living homeless in Davis.

DCMH, in partnership with the nonprofit Davis Opportunity Village (DOVe) and local business leaders and campaign co-chairs Reed and Susan Youmans, sought contributions from members of the community, securing a $750,000 grant from Partnership HealthPlan of California (PHC), to leverage a matching investment from Sutter Health of up to $2.5 million.

“Today’s announcement is the culmination of years of work by so many in our community who want to improve both the lives of those that need it most and the quality of life for all,” said Bill Pride, executive director of Davis Community Meals and Housing. “Our project is a creative community-based solution to a national problem – a solution that can be replicated by others as we in Davis show this approach can work.”

Like many regions statewide, the City of Davis is faced with a challenge in how to address issues related to homelessness. According to a 2017 point-in-time count for Yolo County, there were 146 homeless individuals living in Davis. The 2019 count conducted on a single day in January, however, found 190 people living homeless in Davis, a more than 20 percent increase in two years. Considering the number of people experiencing homelessness in the course of an entire year, it is no wonder that DCMH serves 900 people annually at its current H Street Resource Center, affirming the need for a new collaborative, multi-functional facility.

“Partnership HealthPlan of California is excited to support Davis Community Meals and Housing to expand its services for Davis’ vulnerable population,” said Liz Gibboney, CEO of Partnership HealthPlan of California. “Projects like these can be transformative to a community – and that’s what it is ultimately going to take to address homelessness – community.”

Inspired by a matching grant opportunity from Sutter Health to “think big” about innovative approaches to addressing homelessness, Davis city staff brought together a wide coalition of community members including the faith community, housing advocates, law enforcement, local business and homeless service providers to collaborate on a project that could gain the community and financial support needed to secure a Sutter Health funding match. After months of meetings, several efforts were folded into what ultimately became Paul’s Place, a first-of-its kind vertical housing village that will provide services to hundreds.

“Sutter Health’s support for Paul’s Place is particularly meaningful to me, both because of what it says about our organization and because I am in this community every day and see what happens when private, public and philanthropic partners come together. Sutter Health is thrilled that the match offered through our Getting to Zero campaign encouraged such meaningful collaboration. It is what we had hoped for when we announced the Getting to Zero campaign three years ago,” said Rachael McKinney, CEO at Sutter Davis Hospital. “This investment shows what’s possible in a true culture of caring when the continuum of care extends beyond the care patients receive inside our hospital doors and truly helps improve lives throughout the region.”

The new multi-functional structure was designed by award-winning local architect Maria Ogrydziak to have:

  • Beautiful outdoor space to enrich the neighborhood.
  • A first floor Resource Center with enhanced program space to connect participants with public benefits, housing and employment opportunities, and health and human services — as well as basic needs for food, clothing, showers, restrooms, and laundry facilities. It also will feature, four new emergency shelter beds for law enforcement and other service providers to help people in crisis get off of the streets.
  • The second floor features transitional housing that will provide 10 single residence bedrooms, a communal kitchen, family room, bathrooms and laundry.
  • The third and fourth floors will have a total of 18 300-square-foot private micro-unit apartments of permanent supportive housing, two of which will be accessible for those with physical disabilities, and where all residents will have access to wraparound services to help ensure stability and independence.

“We would not have challenged ourselves to dream this big if not for the matching grant from Sutter Health,” said former Davis Mayor and Paul’s Place Committee Co-Chair Robb Davis. “Paul’s Place is an innovative vertical tiny home village that will provide not only shelter but customized wraparound supportive services to meet the needs of individuals experiencing homelessness – whether for mental health support, addiction recovery, the medically fragile, and/or other social service needs.”

Former long-time Davis Joint Unified School District Trustee and UC Davis Law Professor Emeritus, Marty West, rounds out the leadership team as co-chair with Robb Davis of the committee charged with raising the needed funds during this early stage of the campaign.

Securing the $5 million in construction funding is the first and most crucial phase of the effort to address homelessness in Davis through Paul’s Place. The community team supporting Paul’s Place is continuing to raise the final funds needed to build the project, fund the relocation of crucial programs during construction, to create a fund and endowment to maintain the building once constructed, and provide ongoing operational support for long-term sustainability.

“This is a defining moment in Davis and our mutual efforts to enhance the quality of life for all of our neighbors,” said Campaign Chair Reed Youmans. “As a business owner and long-time resident, I believe Paul’s Place is the right project at the right time. Together, we can help change the lives of those experiencing homelessness, help more people transition to stability, and improve the community for all.”

Plans for Paul’s Place must be reviewed and voted on by the Davis Planning Commission and the Davis City Council. DCMH hopes to gain the needed approvals by fall 2019.

Young Mother Receives Gift of Surgery

Posted on May 14, 2019 in Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Scroll Images

SANTA ROSA, Calif. –Nancy Arrango, 35, was legally blind for a decade. When she closed her right eye, she couldn’t see anything out of her left. She had a hard time caring for her children, and she lost her ability to drive and to work. But without health insurance, cataract surgery was out of reach.

Late last year, Sutter Santa Rosa Surgery & Endoscopy Center and Operation Access partnered to give Nancy the Gift of Surgery. Sutter Health collaborates with Operation Access and other community health clinics every year to provide surgeries and procedures for uninsured patients based on their medical condition, health status and financial need.

Today, Nancy has a new lease on life.

Capital Public Radio Unveils Plans for New State-of-the-Art Headquarters in Downtown Sacramento

Posted on Apr 30, 2019 in Community Benefit, Scroll Images

Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg and Sacramento City Councilmember Steve Hansen Announce New Headquarters at 8th and J Streets

 

Sutter Health Provides Lead Investment Making Landmark Project Possible

 

Courtesy of Capital Public Radio

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Capital Public Radio today unveiled its plans to move to a new state-of-the-art headquarters in the heart of downtown Sacramento and announced a significant investment from Northern California-based, not-for-profit integrated healthcare system Sutter Health. This collaboration signifies Sutter Health’s and CapRadio’s deep commitment to improving community health by creating a space that will function as both a journalism hub and a center for community engagement.

Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg reveals the Sutter Health Center for Community Engagement during Tuesday’s event.

“We are proud to invest in this landmark project and provide the community with greater access to education, collaboration and community empowerment — important facets of a healthy community,” said Sarah Krevans, president and CEO of Sutter Health. “As an integrated, not-for-profit healthcare system, we have an important mission beyond the walls of our healthcare facilities to improve the overall health and wellbeing of the communities we serve. That’s why we invest in programs including those that provide shelter and resources to those who are homeless, increase access to mental healthcare and enhance our community.”

The new headquarters will be a center for news reporting, healthy civic dialogue and shared community experiences, while also contributing to the vitality and economic health of Sacramento’s downtown area. CapRadio will occupy the 34,000-square-foot facility at Eighth and J streets, allowing the NPR-member station to nearly double its staff to 140 members over time, and adding an estimated $4.8 million in wages per year. Sutter Health’s $2.25 million investment for CapRadio’s new headquarters will include the construction of the Sutter Health Center for Community Engagement, which has the capacity to host up to 220 people and as many 300 events per year, generating a potential economic impact of approximately $1.5 million for surrounding businesses in the area.

“With our move, we will add to the vitality and economic health of downtown Sacramento and we will be able to expand on our mission to inspire listeners to look at the world from multiple perspectives, learn from diverse audiences and engage our communities more broadly,” said Rick Eytcheson, president and general manager of Capital Public Radio. “We applaud Sutter Health’s recognition that our shared responsibility includes nurturing the mind and spirit, as well as the body. Sutter Health’s significant investment is making this move a reality, I couldn’t be more thrilled to work with such a committed community partner.”

CapRadio is licensed to California State University, Sacramento and is housed on the campus. Construction on the new downtown headquarters is slated to begin in late 2019 and is scheduled for completion in mid-2020.

Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis, Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg and Sacramento City Councilmember Steve Hansen helped celebrate the announcement at an event that featured a performance by the Sacramento Mandarins drumline, a banner drop to reveal a life-sized image of the entry to the Sutter Health Center for Community Engagement, and more than 100 guests.

“I am excited about this investment and not just because it is in my hometown. This investment reaches far beyond Sacramento and will have positive impacts for our democracy and freedom of expression,” said Lt. Gov. Eleni Kounalakis.

“Strong, credible journalism is crucial to our city and region, and I’m thrilled that Sutter Health’s investment will allow CapRadio to expand its coverage and be in the heart of downtown. This new center will also provide members of our diverse community a place to stay informed and achieve greater common understanding,” said Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg.

“This state-of-the-art headquarters will soon be a destination that will add vitality to our city’s heart and support the creative economy of Sacramento’s downtown and our larger region,” said Sacramento City Councilman Steve Hansen. “As a CapRadio member, I’m elated to see the station put roots in our central city, which is at the crossroads of state and local news. Public radio continues to be the cornerstone of an informed public, and this new headquarters will be a beacon of civic engagement for the community.”

Changing the Face of Healthcare

Posted on Apr 2, 2019 in Community Benefit, Scroll Images

Memorial Medical Center CEO Gino Patrizio, Executive Director of Philanthropy for Sutter Health Valley Area Lisa Hume and Director of External Affairs for Sutter Health Valley Area Holly Harper report out about how their collective efforts support the Stanislaus County community.

MODESTO, Calif.–People may think of healthcare in terms of exam rooms and lab coats, stethoscopes and tongue depressors. Today, healthcare’s modern look features kids fitness classes, donations of healthy food items through mobile food banks or linking the homeless to wrap-around services like housing support, mental health services or addiction counseling.

The image of healthcare is changing—thanks to the teamwork between Sutter and various organizations in our Northern California communities.

During a recent gathering in Modesto, Memorial Medical Center CEO Gino Patrizio and Holly Harper, Sutter Health’s Director of External Affairs in the Valley, talked about how the health of our patients hinges on the health and well-being of their community. They hit on some highlights of how efforts inside and outside hospital and clinic walls supported the greater Stanislaus County in 2018:

  • In partnership with Sutter Health, Golden Valley Health Center’s Street Medicine Program delivers care to those who need it most. Last year, the street medicine program.
    • Served 2,083 individuals experiencing homelessness
    • Conducted 582 nurse assessments
    • Scheduled 70 primary care appointments
  • With support from Sutter Health, Second Harvest’s Mobile Fresh for Kids program made a tremendous impact at Shackelford Elementary School in the first half of 2018:
    • Served 651 children and youth
    • Distributed 48,503 pounds of food and 5,859 nutrition education handouts
    • More than half of parents whose children participated reported increased nutritional knowledge and preparation of healthier meals

Overall, Sutter invested more than $56 million to the underserved through charity care, unreimbursed costs of Medi-Cal and other community benefit support in 2018. This included nearly $1.1 million toward community partnerships that improve the quality of life for those in Stanislaus County. Working with 15 community partners, the programs served more than 43,000 adults and youth in neighborhoods throughout Modesto and all of Stanislaus County. Additionally, it provided more than 104,000 services to the community, including primary care appointments, school wellness activities, transportation and more

“With our community partners, we are always looking for innovative ways to expand access to care, helping to link patients to critical health and social services,” said Harper.  “We couldn’t do this without the help of community partners and feel fortunate to have the opportunity to collaborate with such innovative, creative and dedicated individuals, who are all working toward common goals.”

Many of the community investments stem from direct feedback from residents. Every three years, Sutter Health conducts Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNA) to determine the unique needs and challenges for each community Sutter supports and serves. Using both qualitative and quantitative data collection and focus groups, the CHNA report helps us identify this region’s communities of concern by zip code and the health needs of highest priority. The 2019 CHNA is now underway across Sutter Health.

For more information about Sutter’s investment into Northern California communities, visit Sutter Health’s Community Benefit page.