Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Blankets Warm Bodies and Hearts at Sutter Roseville Infusion Center

Posted on Jul 10, 2019 in People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Thirteen-year-old leukemia survivor Emma Geiselman delivered blankets to grateful patients at Sutter Roseville’s infusion center.

ROSEVILLE, Calif. — Cancer patients who receive infusion services often get quite cold while receiving treatments, which can last for hours, says Sutter Roseville Medical Center Infusion Services Manager Lynnette Messex. Blankets are needed to keep them comfortable while receiving their life-saving care.

Subaru of America, Inc., partnered with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to send hope, love and warmth to patients fighting cancer. On Tuesday, July 9, 80 blankets donated by Roseville Subaru were delivered to Sutter Roseville Medical Center Infusion Services inside the Sutter Cancer Center. In addition, they delivered 30 arts & crafts kits for children who are accompanying a loved one for treatment.

Leukemia survivor Emma Geiselman, 13, a Leukemia & Lymphoma Society “Honored Hero” passed out blankets to patients, and The Sacramento Bee was there to see the gratefulness of these patients battling life-threatening diseases. You can check out The Bee’s story and video here.

During Subaru’s Loves to Care month in June, messages of hope for cancer patients were written by visitors, and those messages will also be delivered. Those who wrote a message of hope at a Subaru retailer also received a reusable tote bag to help spread awareness of LLS and the automaker’s goal to provide hope and care, one gesture at a time.

Sutter Roseville Receives 2019 Emergency Nurses Association Lantern Award

Posted on Jul 10, 2019 in Affiliates, Expanding Access, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, We're Awesome

Sutter Roseville Medical Center recognized with annual award for exceptional and innovative nursing performance


 
ROSEVILLE, Calif. – Sutter Roseville Medical Center’s Emergency Department has been selected as a recipient of the Emergency Nurses Association’s 2019 Lantern Award for demonstrating exceptional and innovative performance in leadership, practice, education, advocacy and research. It is the top award an Emergency Department’s nursing staff can receive, and Sutter Roseville is one of just 28 hospitals nationwide and the only one in Northern California to be honored this year.

The Lantern Award showcases the Sutter Roseville Emergency Department’s accomplishments in incorporating evidence-based practice and innovation into emergency care. EDs are encouraged to share stories that highlight a commitment to care of patients, as well as the well-being of nursing staff. The award serves as a visible symbol of the hospital’s commitment to quality, safety and a healthy work environment.

“We are tremendously proud to receive national recognition of the care we provide to our community, and are grateful for the skilled team that provides that care,” said Gary Gates, R.N., administrative director of Emergency Services, Trauma ICU, and ICU.

Sutter Roseville’s Emergency Department strives to provide an excellent environment for both patients and employees. Highlights of their achievements include a staff-driven redesign of the Stroke Alert; the design and implementation of Code Critical, an overhead activation similar to Trauma and Stroke Alerts for other critically ill patients; a robust Emergency Preparedness program that works closely with local and federal agencies, which included the “Black Hawk Down” preparedness event in June; and incentives for nursing certification that have resulted in a record number of registered nurses obtaining a BCEN (Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing) advanced emergency nursing certification.

Sutter Roseville Medical Center is the premier Level II Trauma Center for the seven-county region, meaning that it features the highly specialized skills and equipment necessary to handle more complicated, critically ill and injured emergency cases. In total, the Sutter Roseville Emergency Department cares for more than 83,000 emergency and trauma patients each year. Because of the community need, Sutter Roseville is currently in the midst of an expansion project that will double the size of the current Emergency Department. This expansion is expected to be completed in April 2020.

“Sutter Roseville Medical Center delivers complex and advanced medical care in an environment that promotes healthier outcomes, and we do it in an area that’s growing and changing very quickly,” said Sutter Roseville CEO Brian Alexander. “That’s a commitment that calls for highly trained physicians, nurses and care teams, modern facilities, advanced technology, and dedication to patient- and family-centered care — all of which were huge drivers behind this expansion.”

Sutter Roseville Medical Center’s Lantern Award will be on display in the Emergency Department. As a recipient, Sutter Roseville Medical Center will be recognized in upcoming ENA publications, on the ENA website and at Emergency Nursing 2019, the association’s annual conference, in Austin, Texas.

The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) is the premier professional nursing association dedicated to defining the future of emergency nursing through advocacy, education, research, innovation, and leadership. Founded in 1970, ENA has proven to be an indispensable resource to the global emergency nursing community. With more than 44,000 members worldwide, ENA advocates for patient safety, develops industry-leading practice standards and guidelines, and guides emergency health care public policy. ENA members have expertise in triage, patient care, disaster preparedness, and all aspects of emergency care. Additional information is available at www.ena.org.

‘Black Hawk Down’ Drill Prepares Roseville for Mass Casualty Event

Posted on Jun 19, 2019 in Expanding Access, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Emergency personnel treat and transport a moulaged patient from the Black Hawk “crash.”

ROSEVILLE, Calif. — A military Black Hawk helicopter bringing trauma patients to Sutter Roseville Medical Center was struck by a drone and crash-landed on the SRMC helipad, with about a dozen injured victims crying for help. That was the scenario facing Sutter Roseville’s emergency services team, which partnered with the Roseville and Rocklin fire departments, the Army National Guard and others for an emergency response drill called “Black Hawk Down” on Wednesday, June 19.

Erik Angle, Sutter Roseville’s emergency preparedness coordinator, told Fox 40 during a television interview that it’s important to work with other community agencies and practice these types of scenarios to “know who to talk to and know each other’s protocols and how you would respond so you can work together seamlessly. And that’s critical for any community to have.”

Sutter Roseville registered nurses triage patients at the trauma center entrance.

Sutter Roseville Medical Center is the premier Level II trauma center for a nine-county region that includes the Sierra Nevada and foothills. Victims of fires and other natural disasters and mass-casualty events could be brought to Sutter Roseville for treatment, especially since it is the only Northern California hospital that has a helipad that can support large military-type helicopters like the Black Hawk and even a Chinook.

The backdrop to Wednesday’s drill was the Sutter Roseville construction project that includes an expansion of the hospital’s emergency services, which will double the size and capabilities of the current Emergency Department. Built into that expansion are elements that will be very beneficial during a mass casualty situation, including the ability to convert the new E.D. lobby into a treatment area in a community emergency.

“To practice these (emergency situations) ahead of time is critical,” Angle said. “That way if they do happen in reality, we’ve already worked out all the kinks.”

Already, Angle is planning another community emergency disaster drill early next year to be staged in the new portion of the Emergency Department right before it opens, so that they are well-prepared for any emergency once the new building opens.

Teaching South Placer Schoolchildren How to ‘Stop the Bleed’

Posted on May 29, 2019 in Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Rocklin Elementary students learn how to “stop the bleed,” an easy skill to learn that could save someone’s life.

SOUTH PLACER COUNTY, Calif. – On Jan. 15, 2019, a gunman went on a shooting spree in Placer County. Multiple rounds were fired and many targets were hit. Two people were struck, one was a tragic fatality and one survived. One of the keys that saved his life was his 8-year-old daughter, who held direct pressure on the bleeding wound.

Per the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), traumatic injuries can affect anyone regardless of their age, race or economic status. In the first half of life, more Americans die from injuries and violence, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls or homicides, than from any other cause of death, including cancer, HIV or the flu. This makes injury the leading cause of death among persons from the ages of 1-44.

In many cases of traumatic injuries, bleeding is a preventable cause of death. The ability to recognize life-threatening bleeding and the ability to intervene effectively can save a person’s life. Whether a bleeding traumatic injury is the result of a home accident or shooting, one person – who is on the scene, at the right time and who has the right training – can save a life.

Sutter Roseville Emergency Department Medical Director Jon Perlstein, M.D., teaches a student how to stop the bleed.

To help save lives, the national Stop the Bleed program was developed by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) in 2015. The goal of the program is to turn the average person into “immediate responders,” the first person at the scene of an injury. This person is rarely a trained medical care provider professional emergency responder. No matter how fast the arrival of emergency services, bystanders will always be first on the scene. A person who is bleeding can die from severe blood loss within minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the bleeding. Those nearest to someone with life-threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.

Team members from Sutter Roseville Medical Center Trauma Services, Emergency Preparedness, Critical Care and the Emergency Department along with American Medical Response, Roseville Fire Department, Auburn Fire Department and Rocklin Fire Department have provided Stop the Bleed training to more than 3,000 students in South Placer County and surrounding areas. These courses can be taught to school-aged children from kindergarten to high school and adult learners. Sutter Roseville has also donated more than 80 Stop the Bleed kits to schools in the Rocklin, Newcastle and Roseville school districts.

Additionally, all staff members at the medical center also receive the training.

“Unexpected injuries, whether accidental or intentional, can occur at their place of work, schools or other public areas,” says Erik Angle, Sutter Roseville Emergency Preparedness Coordinator and registered nurse. “Bystanders are the initial help until help arrives. Being trained, prepared and ready can save lives.”

Kate Carleton, Sutter Roseville Trauma Quality Clinical Education Coordinator, states, “The number one cause of early death from trauma is uncontrolled hemorrhage.  Early direct control of bleeding has been clearly shown to save lives.”

This training can and has saved lives across the country and almost anyone of age can easily learn these lifesaving skills. For more information on the Stop the Bleed Program and possible training, please contact Kate Carleton at carletk@sutterhealth.org.

May 2019 is the first ever National Stop the Bleed Month. This nationwide campaign highlights the importance of Stop the Bleed training and provides the public with information and education through local fire, EMS, and health-care professionals.

Sutter Roseville Begins One-Year Countdown on Completion of Expansion

Posted on May 1, 2019 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

ROSEVILLE, Calif. – Throughout its 21-year history at its current location, Sutter Roseville Medical Center has never stopped growing with the community and region it serves. From expanding the Family Birth Center and the Emergency Department to building Sutter Rehabilitation Institute and new medical offices, Sutter Roseville has been in a state of constant evolution to meet the needs of its patients.

Keegan Kirby, clinical manager of the ED, gestures toward the front entrance of the SRMC expansion project. Part of the glass hasn’t been installed yet to allow for heavy equipment and other items to be lifted into place.

This time next year, the next stage in Sutter Roseville Medical Center’s evolution will be complete: a 98,400-square-foot expansion featuring a new three-story building focused on emergency services and critical care. With construction well underway, the amount of detailed planning that went into the project on behalf of physicians, staff, patients and visitors becomes increasingly evident in everything from layout to materials.

“Sutter Roseville Medical Center delivers complex and advanced medical care in an environment that promotes healthier outcomes, and we do it in an area that’s growing and changing very quickly,” said Sutter Roseville CEO Brian Alexander. “That’s a commitment that calls for highly trained physicians and care teams, modern facilities, advanced technology, and dedication to patient- and family-centered care — all of which were huge drivers behind this expansion.”

Directly outside the current Emergency Department, the new building will include: 35 additional emergency treatment beds, increasing the total number of emergency beds to 69, plus seven triage rooms; 36 additional intensive care beds (24 upon construction, plus 12 shelled for the future); three catheterization labs, plus one available for future growth; and four operating and/or procedure rooms shelled for future use.

Sutter Roseville is the premier Level II Trauma Center for the seven-county region, meaning that it features the highly specialized skills and equipment necessary to handle more complicated, critically ill and injured emergency cases as well as the more “routine” emergencies.

The Sutter Roseville Medical Center expansion from the webcam.

When the Emergency Department was expanded in 2005, it was built to treat up to 65,000 patients annually. But Placer County’s explosive growth has Sutter Roseville in reality seeing more than 83,000 emergency and trauma patients each year — a difference of nearly 30 percent.

Of the 10 biggest cities in California, Sacramento is seeing the largest percentage gain in population. Placer County — where Roseville is located — is also one of the fastest growing counties in the state. At the same time, the age of the area’s population is shifting upward, putting pressure on the local healthcare system. Staff and physicians have been creative and effective in deploying stopgap measures, but the expansion represents a more sustainable solution.

During a recent tour of the construction site, Keegan Kirby, clinical manager of Sutter Roseville’s Emergency Department, pointed to the many features that will improve patient care in essence by making it easier for doctors and staff to do their jobs. Some of those features include: patient rooms that are completely identical in layout; medications, supplies and workspaces that are centrally located; and a satellite pharmacy for the most critically ill or injured patients.

“We want a flexible space that allows us to take care of any kind of patient — these are key things to provide that care, so we wanted to make sure they were easily accessible,” Keegan said.

Other components of the expansion include moving the Emergency Department main entrance to the new building to create a larger space for vehicle traffic and patient access. The new lobby will also be expanded to accommodate more patients and families waiting for services, as well as better connection to triage rooms and care services. With natural light and aesthetic choices, the new building and remodeled space will complement Sutter Roseville’s overall healing environment that serves patient and family needs and promotes mind and body health.

Said Joan Touloukian, Sutter Roseville Medical Center’s master plan project director: “The entire project is designed to increase capacity in an efficient yet patient-centered environment, providing emergency and critical care that is as much about the practical as it is about the personal.”

A webcam has been following the project from the beginning of construction two years ago. Click here to view the current project, click on “Time-Lapse” for a video review of the construction from the start, and check back often to see progress being made.

Toddler Nearly Dies on Airsoft Gun Pellet, Is Saved by Sutter Surgeon

Posted on Mar 13, 2019 in Pediatric Care, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Joy Graf, M.D., reunites with the toddler whose life she saved by extracting a pellet that the child had inhaled.

“She went from near-death to back home in 24 hours.”

That’s how Daniel Falco, M.D., co-medical director of the Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Children’s Center, sums up the story of Genevieve Sayers, the 18-month-old daughter of of Marissa and Kevin Sayers of Rocklin.

During breakfast on Jan. 29, Evie suddenly stopped breathing, turned purple and stopped responding. Her parents rushed her to the nearby fire station and an ambulance took her to Sutter Roseville Medical Center, where she was stabilized and sent by ambulance to Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Children’s Center for emergency pediatric surgery. Doctors at the Sutter Children’s Center didn’t expect the child to survive the transport, but the Sutter Critical Care Team kept her alive.

Once at the hospital, she was expected to be put on a heart-and-lung-bypass machine called ECMO, but pediatric surgeon Joy Graf, M.D., was miraculously able to extract the pellet quickly.

Once awakened from sedation, Evie was back to her rambunctious self and left the hospital the next morning. The story illustrates how the Sutter staffs in Roseville and Sacramento worked together to work a miracle.

“I never thought I would appreciate attitude from a child,” mom Marissa Sayers says, “but every screech or flailing arm means that she is still our same little girl. … Everyone hug their kids tight;  your world can change in the blink of an eye.”

See the complete story of the family’s tearful reunion with the doctors and nurses who saved this child’s life on KOVR-CBS-13 and KXTV-ABC-10.