Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Helping Mind the Gap on Cardiovascular Diseases

Posted on Feb 7, 2020 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Cardiac, Expanding Access, Innovation, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Medical Foundation, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Heart valve imaging
Heart valve imaging

Lifesavers appear in big sizes and small. For patient Adam Livingstone, rescue was a dime-sized clip that restored his heart’s normal rhythm and size. For months, Livingstone had been experiencing shortness of breath, chest pain and fatigue. Diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation, a minimally invasive procedure to repair the valve was performed at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento—one of Sutter’s sites where researchers evaluate new devices for treating damaged or diseased heart valves.

The Heart’s Finely Orchestrated Blood Flow

Heart valves
Heart valves

Like a musical conductor, the heart oversees rhythm and flow, circulating blood to each of its chambers in a coordinated, unidirectional symphony.

THE MITRAL VALVE

Mitral regurgitation, the most common type of heart valve disorder, occurs when blood leaks backward through the mitral valve when the left ventricle closes.

Some patients undergo non-surgical heart valve repair with transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) with MitraClip®.2 During the procedure, doctors thread a catheter into a large leg vein reaching the heart. Then a dime-sized clip clamps the improperly working valve, allowing it to close more tightly with less backward blood flow.

“Some research participants recover faster and resume normal activities within a week of the procedure, and may not require lifelong anticoagulant medications, repeat surgeries, or re-hospitalization,” says David Roberts, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, medical director of cardiovascular services at Sutter in the Valley Area.

A new clinical trial at Sutter called PASCAL CLASP IID/IIF will test the safety and effectiveness of TMVR with the PASCAL Transcatheter Valve Repair System® compared with MitraClip® in patients with mitral regurgitation.3

For patients with severe mitral regurgitation, Sutter’s CPMC seeks to enroll patients in a clinical trial called SM3, which assesses the safety and efficacy of the SAPIEN M3 System™.4

“In this study, we are evaluating a new type of mitral valve that may provide a minimally invasive alternative to surgery for high-risk patients with severe mitral valve disease,” says David Daniels, M.D., co-director of Sutter’s Structural Heart Program in the Bay Area, and principal investigator of the SM3 clinical trial at Sutter.

Some patients develop mitral valve disease when calcium deposits accumulate on the fibrous ring attached to the mitral valve leaflets. For these patients with mitral annular calcification (MAC), Sutter will begin offering enrollment in the Summit clinical trial, which will test the safety and effectiveness of the Tendyne™ transcatheter mitral valve.5

“Previous approaches to treat patients with MAC have mainly involved the off-label use of transcatheter aortic valves,” says Dr. Roberts. “But this strategy may lead to residual mitral regurgitation and the need for open-heart surgery. Sutter’s participation in Summit may lead to novel ways to care for this hard-to-treat subset of patients.”

THE TRICUSPID AND AORTIC VALVES

Although a skilled conductor, sometimes the heart needs help to maintain proper blood flow for musical perfection. To the rescue: Sutter researchers test interventional devices designed to treat patients with diseased or damaged tricuspid and aortic valves.

In one new clinical trial, Sutter researchers will collect information about treatment for severe aortic regurgitation, a condition typically treated with aortic valve replacement surgery.

This study will examine the use of TAVR (Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement), a minimally invasive procedure designed to replace the aortic valve inside the heart. In this study, TAVR will be performed using the JenaValve™ Pericardial TAVR System, designed to help treat patients with severe aortic regurgitation or severe aortic stenosis.6

“Until now, all commercially available TAVR valves have focused on aortic stenosis, or a restricted valve,” says Dr. Daniels, co-principal investigator of the TAVR with JenaValve™ clinical trial at Sutter. “The JenaValve™ may allow researchers to treat patients with a leaky valve in the absence of any calcium. Currently these patients are only candidates for open-heart surgery.”

Additionally, Sutter researchers at CPMC and Sutter Medical Center are seeking to enroll patients who have tricuspid regurgitation in a clinical trial called TRILUMINATE.

The TRILUMINATE study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Tricuspid Valve Repair System™ (TVRS) for treating moderate or severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients currently on medical management and who are deemed appropriate for percutaneous transcatheter intervention.7

  • Learn more about Sutter cardiovascular diseases research and clinical trials.
  • If you are suffering from mitral or tricuspid valve regurgitation, aortic valve stenosis or other heart valve disorder, talk to your cardiologist to see if research participation and/or valve replacement or repair is right for you.

References:

  1. American Heart Association.
  2. MitraClip™ is manufactured by Abbott Medical Devices.
  3. The PASCAL clinical trial is sponsored by Edwards Life Sciences, makers of the Transcatheter Valve Repair System®.
  4. The S3 clinical trial is sponsored by Edwards Life Sciences, makers of the SAPIEN M3 System™.
  5. The Summit clinical trial is sponsored by Abbott Medical Devices, makers of the Tendyne System™.
  6. The JenaValve™ clinical trial is sponsored by JenaValve Technology, Inc., makers of the Pericardial Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) System.
  7. The TRILUMINATE clinical trial is sponsored by Abbott Medical Devices, makers of the Tricuspid Valve Repair System™.

Expectant Mom Suffers Massive Stroke: How a Health Network Saved Her and Her Baby

Posted on Oct 25, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Expanding Access, Innovation, Neuroscience, Pediatric Care, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Women's Services

Just two days from delivering her third child, Vivian Dos Santos suffered an intracerebral hemorrhage – a life-threatening stroke. Watch her amazing story, with details on how an integrated health network saves and blesses lives, by viewing the following video. You may want some tissues handy just in case …

For more on her story, and to view an infographic on Sutter’s integrated system, go to www.sutterhealth.org/newsroom/can-expect-integrated-network.

What You Can Expect from an Integrated Network

Posted on Sep 30, 2019 in Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Vivian Dos Santos lost consciousness at her home in Davis, Calif., just days away from delivering her third child, Stella. She woke up at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento – more than 15 miles away – with bandages on her head and no longer pregnant. She was unaware that care teams at two Sutter network facilities had come together to save her life and care for her baby after she suffered a sudden and severe stroke. Ultimately, Vivian’s care would include three Sutter network facilities coordinating an emergency caesarean section, lifesaving neurosurgery and extensive rehabilitation.

Vivian Dos Santos and her family say thanks to some of her caregivers at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento.

The coordinated care that Sutter provided to the Dos Santos family is a testament to our integrated healthcare network and the coordination that occurs between multiple medical facilities, practitioners, and services to ensure that patients receive timely, high quality care when they need it most. (To view an infographic on Sutter’s integrated network and Vivian’s journey, click here.)

Vivian’s first sign of trouble came on Dec. 31, 2018. As she prepared to ring in the New Year with her husband and their two young sons, she began experiencing an excruciating headache. Shortly after she suddenly lost consciousness, an ambulance rushed Vivian to Sutter Davis Hospital’s Emergency Department.

There, doctors determined that Vivian was suffering from an intracerebral hemorrhage – a life-threatening brain bleed. Vivian’s obstetrician and physician at Sutter Davis consulted with a neurosurgeon at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento (SMCS) and ultimately decided an immediate emergency C-section was the safest treatment approach for Vivian and her baby. The Sutter Davis care team stabilized Vivian while delivering baby Stella, and then airlifted Vivian to SMCS for immediate neurosurgery.

During surgery, stroke experts at SMCS successfully stopped the bleeding. After Vivian recovered from surgery, she was transferred to the Sutter Rehabilitation Institution in Roseville where she received advanced rehabilitation care. Meanwhile, Sutter Davis’ labor and delivery team helped Vivian’s husband care for the couple’s healthy newborn daughter, Stella.

Our team’s ability to develop and implement a treatment plan spanning multiple facilities — which remained in constant communication and included comprehensive access to Vivian’s medical records — proved critical to saving Vivian and Stella’s lives.

“When you have a single network, it really improves the communication,” said Dr. Rudolph Schrot, Vivian’s neurosurgeon. “You have a very rapid transfer from one facility to another, from Sutter Davis to Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, to the Sutter Rehab Institute. There’s a constant thread that goes through this patient’s experience, where there’s immediate access to medical records, communication between providers, and also a very rapid response.”

Sutter’s integrated system helps provide patients like Vivian and Stella with qualified, highly-trained medical staff throughout a life-threatening medical emergency. The system allows for smoother transitions between inpatient and outpatient services, multi-specialty teams that can address patient care holistically while reducing complications and, in turn, lower hospital readmission rates and total cost of care for patients. The coordinated care model also allows teams to share ideas, improve communication and spread best practices across locations – ultimately contributing to improved care, a more user-friendly experience, and better patient outcomes.

“Coordinating our efforts across facilities, doctors, teams and locations is crucial to providing patient-centered care throughout a patient’s journey,” said Steve Lockhart, M.D., Sutter Health’s Chief Medical Officer. “Our integrated network enables us to be attuned to a patient’s needs and provide personalized care from inpatient to outpatient, preventive to rehabilitative, hospice to home healthcare.”

Lockhart continues, “At Sutter, we believe ready access to multiple types of patient-centered care from well-informed and highly coordinated providers sets integrated care networks apart. This connectivity allows Sutter to provide innovative, quality care to more than 3 million Californians. Our integrated system ultimately helps improve patient outcomes, resulting in happier, healthier families and communities.”

Blankets Warm Bodies and Hearts at Sutter Roseville Infusion Center

Posted on Jul 10, 2019 in People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Thirteen-year-old leukemia survivor Emma Geiselman delivered blankets to grateful patients at Sutter Roseville’s infusion center.

ROSEVILLE, Calif. — Cancer patients who receive infusion services often get quite cold while receiving treatments, which can last for hours, says Sutter Roseville Medical Center Infusion Services Manager Lynnette Messex. Blankets are needed to keep them comfortable while receiving their life-saving care.

Subaru of America, Inc., partnered with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to send hope, love and warmth to patients fighting cancer. On Tuesday, July 9, 80 blankets donated by Roseville Subaru were delivered to Sutter Roseville Medical Center Infusion Services inside the Sutter Cancer Center. In addition, they delivered 30 arts & crafts kits for children who are accompanying a loved one for treatment.

Leukemia survivor Emma Geiselman, 13, a Leukemia & Lymphoma Society “Honored Hero” passed out blankets to patients, and The Sacramento Bee was there to see the gratefulness of these patients battling life-threatening diseases. You can check out The Bee’s story and video here.

During Subaru’s Loves to Care month in June, messages of hope for cancer patients were written by visitors, and those messages will also be delivered. Those who wrote a message of hope at a Subaru retailer also received a reusable tote bag to help spread awareness of LLS and the automaker’s goal to provide hope and care, one gesture at a time.

Sutter Roseville Receives 2019 Emergency Nurses Association Lantern Award

Posted on Jul 10, 2019 in Affiliates, Expanding Access, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, We're Awesome

Sutter Roseville Medical Center recognized with annual award for exceptional and innovative nursing performance


 
ROSEVILLE, Calif. – Sutter Roseville Medical Center’s Emergency Department has been selected as a recipient of the Emergency Nurses Association’s 2019 Lantern Award for demonstrating exceptional and innovative performance in leadership, practice, education, advocacy and research. It is the top award an Emergency Department’s nursing staff can receive, and Sutter Roseville is one of just 28 hospitals nationwide and the only one in Northern California to be honored this year.

The Lantern Award showcases the Sutter Roseville Emergency Department’s accomplishments in incorporating evidence-based practice and innovation into emergency care. EDs are encouraged to share stories that highlight a commitment to care of patients, as well as the well-being of nursing staff. The award serves as a visible symbol of the hospital’s commitment to quality, safety and a healthy work environment.

“We are tremendously proud to receive national recognition of the care we provide to our community, and are grateful for the skilled team that provides that care,” said Gary Gates, R.N., administrative director of Emergency Services, Trauma ICU, and ICU.

Sutter Roseville’s Emergency Department strives to provide an excellent environment for both patients and employees. Highlights of their achievements include a staff-driven redesign of the Stroke Alert; the design and implementation of Code Critical, an overhead activation similar to Trauma and Stroke Alerts for other critically ill patients; a robust Emergency Preparedness program that works closely with local and federal agencies, which included the “Black Hawk Down” preparedness event in June; and incentives for nursing certification that have resulted in a record number of registered nurses obtaining a BCEN (Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing) advanced emergency nursing certification.

Sutter Roseville Medical Center is the premier Level II Trauma Center for the seven-county region, meaning that it features the highly specialized skills and equipment necessary to handle more complicated, critically ill and injured emergency cases. In total, the Sutter Roseville Emergency Department cares for more than 83,000 emergency and trauma patients each year. Because of the community need, Sutter Roseville is currently in the midst of an expansion project that will double the size of the current Emergency Department. This expansion is expected to be completed in April 2020.

“Sutter Roseville Medical Center delivers complex and advanced medical care in an environment that promotes healthier outcomes, and we do it in an area that’s growing and changing very quickly,” said Sutter Roseville CEO Brian Alexander. “That’s a commitment that calls for highly trained physicians, nurses and care teams, modern facilities, advanced technology, and dedication to patient- and family-centered care — all of which were huge drivers behind this expansion.”

Sutter Roseville Medical Center’s Lantern Award will be on display in the Emergency Department. As a recipient, Sutter Roseville Medical Center will be recognized in upcoming ENA publications, on the ENA website and at Emergency Nursing 2019, the association’s annual conference, in Austin, Texas.

The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) is the premier professional nursing association dedicated to defining the future of emergency nursing through advocacy, education, research, innovation, and leadership. Founded in 1970, ENA has proven to be an indispensable resource to the global emergency nursing community. With more than 44,000 members worldwide, ENA advocates for patient safety, develops industry-leading practice standards and guidelines, and guides emergency health care public policy. ENA members have expertise in triage, patient care, disaster preparedness, and all aspects of emergency care. Additional information is available at www.ena.org.

‘Black Hawk Down’ Drill Prepares Roseville for Mass Casualty Event

Posted on Jun 19, 2019 in Expanding Access, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Emergency personnel treat and transport a moulaged patient from the Black Hawk “crash.”

ROSEVILLE, Calif. — A military Black Hawk helicopter bringing trauma patients to Sutter Roseville Medical Center was struck by a drone and crash-landed on the SRMC helipad, with about a dozen injured victims crying for help. That was the scenario facing Sutter Roseville’s emergency services team, which partnered with the Roseville and Rocklin fire departments, the Army National Guard and others for an emergency response drill called “Black Hawk Down” on Wednesday, June 19.

Erik Angle, Sutter Roseville’s emergency preparedness coordinator, told Fox 40 during a television interview that it’s important to work with other community agencies and practice these types of scenarios to “know who to talk to and know each other’s protocols and how you would respond so you can work together seamlessly. And that’s critical for any community to have.”

Sutter Roseville registered nurses triage patients at the trauma center entrance.

Sutter Roseville Medical Center is the premier Level II trauma center for a nine-county region that includes the Sierra Nevada and foothills. Victims of fires and other natural disasters and mass-casualty events could be brought to Sutter Roseville for treatment, especially since it is the only Northern California hospital that has a helipad that can support large military-type helicopters like the Black Hawk and even a Chinook.

The backdrop to Wednesday’s drill was the Sutter Roseville construction project that includes an expansion of the hospital’s emergency services, which will double the size and capabilities of the current Emergency Department. Built into that expansion are elements that will be very beneficial during a mass casualty situation, including the ability to convert the new E.D. lobby into a treatment area in a community emergency.

“To practice these (emergency situations) ahead of time is critical,” Angle said. “That way if they do happen in reality, we’ve already worked out all the kinks.”

Already, Angle is planning another community emergency disaster drill early next year to be staged in the new portion of the Emergency Department right before it opens, so that they are well-prepared for any emergency once the new building opens.