Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento

Federal Grant to Expand Physician Residency Program to Rural County

Posted on Jul 23, 2019 in Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Amador Hospital, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation

HRSA Rural Residency Program Addresses Growing Shortage of Family Medicine Physicians in Gold Country Communities

Sutter Amador Hospital

JACKSON, Calif.Sutter Health was awarded a $750,000 grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to expand its Sacramento-based physician residency program to Amador County as part of the federal agency’s efforts to provide better access to quality medical care in rural areas.

The HRSA Rural Residency Planning and Development grant will help not-for-profit Sutter Health expand its successful Family Medicine Residency Program located in Sacramento and Davis to the Sutter Amador Hospital campus.

“The health challenges in rural America are clear: Rural communities face a greater risk of poor health outcomes than their urban counterparts,” said HRSA Administrator George Sigounas, MS, Ph.D. “Programs like the Rural Residency Planning and Development grants take aim at one of the most persistent disparities: access to high-quality healthcare providers. HRSA is committed to increasing the number of providers serving rural communities and improving health in rural America.”

This grant is part of a larger $20 million multi-year initiative by HRSA to expand the physician workforce in rural areas by developing new, sustainable residency programs in family medicine, internal medicine and psychiatry.

The goal of the Sutter Health project is to develop a sustainable, accredited rural training track in the Mother Lode and to ultimately expand the area’s rural primary care workforce. In Amador County, there is an evident high need for primary-care physicians (PCPs)in the area as the ratio of the population to one PCP is 1,760-to-1; the ratio throughout the state of California is 1,280 residents to one PCP, according to the County Health Rankings and Roadmaps website.

“Because of the strength of its integrated network, Sutter has created multiple residency and fellowship programs in primary care and specialty areas over the last two decades,” said Ash Gokli, M.D., chief medical officer for the Sutter Health Valley Area. “By expanding our residency program into Amador County, we can help address the shortage of family medicine providers that is being felt disproportionately in rural areas. We are working to strengthen the physician pipeline throughout our integrated network so our patients receive the same high-quality care no matter what community they live in.”

The Sutter Health Family Medicine Residency Program is based at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento. It is a community-based program where residents in family medicine complete core inpatient training in Sacramento during the first year, with their next two years in Sacramento or Davis. Currently there are 21 residents in the program, and the Amador County program will expand the program to 27 residents. Since its inception in 1995, the Sutter Family Medicine Residency Program has graduated 139 physicians, all of whom passed their Board Certification assessments on the first effort. For more on the program, go to www.suttermd.com/education/residency/family-medicine.

HRSA, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary federal agency for improving health care to people who are geographically isolated, economically or medically vulnerable. HRSA programs help those in need of high quality primary health care, people living with HIV/AIDS, pregnant women, and mothers. HRSA also supports the training of health professionals, the distribution of providers to areas where they are needed most and improvements in health care delivery. For more on HRSA, go to www.hrsa.gov.

Sutter Delivers the Best Mother’s Day Gifts: New Babies

Posted on May 12, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Uncategorized, Women's Services

SACRAMENTO and SAN FRANCISCO — While looking down lovingly at her brand-spanking-new little baby boy, Cody, a tired yet glowingly beautiful Leah Strange of Sacramento pondered how grateful she felt to have given birth on Mother’s Day.

Leah Strange gave birth to baby Cody on Mother’s Day at Sutter Medical Center. Looking at his baby girl is Dad Adam Strange.

“He was overdue,” Leah said, “but I had a feeling he was going to wait it out and make it an extra-special day.”

By Sunday afternoon, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento already made it an extra-special day for 11 women by delivering the best Mother’s Day gift ever – 11 new babies. By the end of the day, it was expected that 15 bundles of joy would be born at what is known by the locals as “Sacramento’s baby hospital,” which has delivered a city worth of babies – nearly 400,000 – in its 95-year history. More than 6,000 babies are born there every year.

Ninety miles west, it was the first Mother’s Day at Sutter CPMC Mission Bernal campus, one of the newest hospitals in Northern California, having replaced the venerable St. Luke’s campus. As extra-special treats, Mission Bernal serenaded new moms with a musical duo from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music to go along with their new, spacious rooms and penthouse views of the City by the Bay.

Janelle McCarthy was born at St. Luke’s, but gave birth to her second daughter, Evelyn, at the new CPMC Mission Bernal hospital campus. With them is Dad Sean McCarthy and their first daughter, Alexandria.

Janelle McCarthy, with her baby, Evelyn, was getting ready to go home, but she and her little family stopped long enough to appreciate the calming classical sounds of the flute-and-guitar duo.

“I am really happy to be at this hospital,” she said. “I was born at St. Luke’s, my first child was born at St. Luke’s, and now my second child was born here at Mission Bernal. They really take care of you here. It’s great.”

In Northern California, more babies are born at Sutter Health hospitals than anywhere else. The CPMC campuses at Mission Bernal and Van Ness deliver half of all babies born in San Francisco, and Mission Bernal is on target for more than 1,000 newborns in its first year. Throughout Northern California, an average of about 85 babies – or almost four kindergarten classes worth – are born at Sutter Health hospitals every single day … and some, like Cody Strange, hold out to be born on Mother’s Day.

“I feel super lucky and fortunate to have the opportunity to carry him and deliver him, and then be healthy and here,” said Leah Strange as she fought back tears. “So, I’m super grateful.”

Charisse Francis and Kalin Green are all smiles with Kalin’s “Mother’s Day gift,” baby Marley-Rose.

Down the hall, though, it sounded more like the Mother’s Day present was for Dad, not Mom.

Charisse Francis of Sacramento looked stunning as she prepared to go home with her third child, a beautiful, little girl named Marley-Rose. Waiting at home are Marley-Rose’s two brothers, who are just 3 and 2 years old.

“I have two boys who really, really love Mom a lot,” said proud papa Kalin Green as he held Marley-Rose. “I understand. I’m a Mama’s boy, and they are too, so I need a Daddy’s girl.” As Charisse laughed, Kalin looked down at his little sweetheart and said, “So this is mine.”

Leading Neurologist Gives Insight on Stroke Care Innovation

Posted on May 2, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO – Every second counts in detecting and treating stroke, the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the U.S. Each year, approximately 795,000 people suffer a stroke. New research at Sutter Health is helping bring faster, life-changing care to stroke patients through a clinical trial called BEST-MSU that will test the efficacy of Sutter’s Mobile Stroke Unit (MSU).

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Sutter’s Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program First in Area to Receive National Accreditation

Posted on Apr 12, 2019 in Cardiac, Innovation, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Medical Foundation, Uncategorized

The Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Adult Congenital Heart Disease team includes ACHD Medical Director Pei-Hsiu Huang, M.D., right, and ACHD Clinic Coordinator Zilda Crist, left. They are shown with Chelsea Byrnes, who was born with a rare condition and was told she could never have children. She now has given birth twice at Sutter Medical Center, thanks to the advanced care of the ACHD team.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – In recognition of its expertise in serving adults with congenital heart disease (CHD), Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento earned accreditation from the Adult Congenital Heart Association (ACHA), a nationwide organization focused on connecting patients, family members and healthcare providers to form a community of support and a network of experts with knowledge of CHD.

Individuals with CHD, the most common birth defect diagnosed in one in 100 births, are living longer. There are 1.4 million adults in the U.S. living with one of many different types of congenital heart defects, ranging among simple, moderate and complex.

“We find that patients born with a heart defect who have graduated from the care of a pediatric cardiologist frequently do not continue their care with a cardiologist with specific expertise in treating adults with congenital heart disease, and sometimes do not have a cardiologist at all,” said Pei-Hsiu Huang, M.D., medical director of the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento. “As Sacramento’s first and only adult congenital heart disease program, we are excited to be recognized by the ACHA for providing ACHD patients, many of whom may not otherwise be seeing a cardiologist regularly, the best and most appropriate care.”

Pediatric Heart Surgeon Teimour Nasirov, M.D., left, is a member of the Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento ACHD team. In 2018, Dr. Nasirov repaired RJ Laffins’ atrial septal defect, which went undetected for 55 years. Laffins, right, is now winning cycling races thanks to his increased energy after the surgery.

The ACHA accreditation program aims to improve the quality of care ACHD patients receive by introducing standards for the infrastructure and the type of care ACHD programs provide. The Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program received accreditation by meeting ACHA’s criteria, which includes medical services and personnel requirements, and going through a rigorous accreditation process, both of which were developed over a number of years through a collaboration with doctors, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, and ACHD patients.

“There are now more adults than children in the U.S. with CHD,” said Mark Roeder, President and CEO of ACHA. “Accreditation will elevate the standard of care and have a positive impact on the futures of those living with this disease. Coordination of care is key, and this accreditation program will make care more streamlined for ACHD patients, improving their quality of life.”

There are now 27 ACHA ACHD Accredited programs throughout the United States. The only other programs in California outside the greater Sacramento area that have been accredited are at UCLA and Stanford.

The Sutter Heart & Vascular Institute at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento provides comprehensive cardiovascular care throughout a patient’s life. Specialized multisciplinary teams combine the resources and clinical expertise including high-risk obstetrics services and pediatric cardiovascular program, the comprehensive adult cardiovascular program including the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program. Pediatric and adult heart disease specialists include board certified cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, cardiac anesthesiologists, obstetricians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners, nurses, registered dietitians, financial coordinators, pharmacists and genetic counselors.

About the Adult Congenital Heart Association

The Adult Congenital Heart Association (ACHA) is a national not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of life and extending the lives of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). ACHA serves and supports the more than one million adults with CHD, their families and the medical community—working with them to address the unmet needs of the long-term survivors of congenital heart defects through education, outreach, advocacy, and promotion of ACHD research. For more information about ACHA, contact 888-921-ACHA or visit www.ACHAHeart.org.

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The ACHA ACHD Accreditation Program was partially funded by Actelion Pharmaceuticals U.S., Inc. ACHA and Actelion Pharmaceuticals have partnered together since 2007 to support the CHD community.

For more information about ACHA, or to schedule an interview with Mark Roeder, please contact Terri Schaefer at 215-849-1260 or tschaefer@achaheart.org.

Toddler Nearly Dies on Airsoft Gun Pellet, Is Saved by Sutter Surgeon

Posted on Mar 13, 2019 in Pediatric Care, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Joy Graf, M.D., reunites with the toddler whose life she saved by extracting a pellet that the child had inhaled.

“She went from near-death to back home in 24 hours.”

That’s how Daniel Falco, M.D., co-medical director of the Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Children’s Center, sums up the story of Genevieve Sayers, the 18-month-old daughter of of Marissa and Kevin Sayers of Rocklin.

During breakfast on Jan. 29, Evie suddenly stopped breathing, turned purple and stopped responding. Her parents rushed her to the nearby fire station and an ambulance took her to Sutter Roseville Medical Center, where she was stabilized and sent by ambulance to Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento Children’s Center for emergency pediatric surgery. Doctors at the Sutter Children’s Center didn’t expect the child to survive the transport, but the Sutter Critical Care Team kept her alive.

Once at the hospital, she was expected to be put on a heart-and-lung-bypass machine called ECMO, but pediatric surgeon Joy Graf, M.D., was miraculously able to extract the pellet quickly.

Once awakened from sedation, Evie was back to her rambunctious self and left the hospital the next morning. The story illustrates how the Sutter staffs in Roseville and Sacramento worked together to work a miracle.

“I never thought I would appreciate attitude from a child,” mom Marissa Sayers says, “but every screech or flailing arm means that she is still our same little girl. … Everyone hug their kids tight;  your world can change in the blink of an eye.”

See the complete story of the family’s tearful reunion with the doctors and nurses who saved this child’s life on KOVR-CBS-13 and KXTV-ABC-10.

Sutter Health a Leading Site Enrolling Patients to the PARTNER 3 Trial for Treatment of Aortic Value Stenosis

Posted on Feb 28, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Cardiac, Eden Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Novato Community Hospital, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Gould Medical Foundation, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Medical Foundation, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO – Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a minimally invasive procedure done without open-heart surgery to replace a narrowed aortic valve. The procedure is one of several research breakthroughs and interventional cardiology advances being pioneered at Sutter Health through the research of David Daniels, MD, an interventional cardiologist at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center and California Pacific Medical Center who directs Sutter’s Structural Heart Program, and collaborators across Sutter.

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