Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa

There’s Room at This Inn: Firefighters Battling Kincade Fire Find Respite in Rebuilt Home for Families of Hospitalized Babies

Posted on Nov 7, 2019 in NICU, People, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa

Newly-reopened facility was destroyed in 2017 Tubbs Fire

SANTA ROSA, Calif. –Sutter Health’s mission is to care for the health and well-being of its neighbors, especially in an emergency. So when Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital was ordered to evacuate patients on Oct. 26 for the second time in two years, the Elizabeth and Bill Shea House, normally used by families of hospitalized babies, was offered to firefighters as a place to rest.

The Elizabeth and Bill Shea House

About 100 firefighters representing Cal Fire, Pacifica, Napa, Clearlake, Pomona, Mill Valley, Walnut Creek and Santa Rosa, who were using the hospital’s parking lot as a staging area, accepted the offer to relax, catch up on much-needed sleep, rehydrate and have a snack at Shea House before returning to the frontlines of the fire.

“We were so pleased to be able to offer the first responders a comfortable place to take a break from fighting the Kincade Fire,” said Mike Purvis, CEO of Sutter Santa Rosa. “Sutter Santa Rosa has been a part of this community for many years and we were glad to support their efforts to save it.”

Ironically, finishing touches had just been completed on the newly-rebuilt Shea House –which was destroyed in the 2017 Tubbs Fire.

Now that the Kincade Fire is contained and Sutter Santa Rosa has reopened for patients, Shea House is again providing free lodging for low-income families of hospitalized babies who need a nearby place to stay while their newborns are cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

About the Elizabeth and Bill Shea House

Nothing is more stressful for a parent and family than having a hospitalized child. The feeling of helplessness can be overwhelming, especially when home is far from the hospital. Studies have long shown that parent presence at the bedside of a sick child is critical to bonding and long-term recovery. For low-income families that don’t live near the hospital, staying in the area can be a significant hardship.

Since it opened in 2004, more than 560 families from across Northern California, including far-flung communities like Ukiah, Gualala, Potter Valley, Sea Ranch, Middletown, Talmage and Willits, have benefited from the comfort of Shea House’s home-like environment. Families stay in one of four private suites anywhere from one to 60 days, with an average stay of about nine days. Shea House also offers guests a fully-equipped kitchen, laundry facilities and comfortable indoor and outdoor areas in which to relax. With the average cost of a nearby hotel room running $225 per night, it’s easy to see how a lengthy hospital stay could be a hardship on any family, let alone one with limited financial resources. To date, Shea House has provided more than $831,000 worth of accommodation to these families.

The Elizabeth and Bill Shea House was rebuilt through the generosity of community donors and its namesakes, Elizabeth and Bill Shea. Shea House’s operational costs are entirely supported by the Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital Foundation.

About Sutter Santa Rosa’s Care for Sonoma County’s NICU Patients and Their Families

For nearly 50 years, Sutter Santa Rosa’s NICU has provided the highest level of intensive care for newborns in the community. An average of 300 newborns are admitted to its NICU each year. These babies and their families would otherwise have to travel to San Francisco to receive life-saving treatment. With 12 NICU beds, three full-time neonatologists and 39 specially trained nurses, the NICU offers pediatric subspecialties including neurology and leading-edge technology to ensure the best possible outcomes for its tiny patients and provides their families with support services to address the many challenges they face in caring for their newborns.

Quelling the Storms of Seizures in People with Epilepsy

Posted on Nov 1, 2019 in Affiliates, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Neuroscience, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation, Uncategorized

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – An electrical “storm” in the brain causes seizures in people with epilepsy, producing symptoms that may include lapses in consciousness, twitching or jerking movements, weakened or limp muscles, spasms, blurred vision, experiencing unusual smells or tastes, and changes in sensation or emotions.

Epilepsy—a neurological disorder caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain—impacts almost 3.4 million nationwide.1 Despite advances in epilepsy treatment, approximately one-third of adults with the illness experience recurrent seizures.2

Epileptic seizures are generally categorized into three main groups: generalized (affecting both sides of the brain), focal (seizures that start in one area of the brain), and those that could start anywhere.

The stormy weather of seizures can clear with medications called anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). AEDs can to stop seizures from occurring, but they do not always lead to a remission or cure epilepsy. With the right AEDs, up to 70% of people with the illness may remain seizure-free, and sometimes may “outgrow” seizures or go into remission. For other people whose seizures are uncontrolled with conventional AEDs, other treatments including surgery may be an option. Surgery may involve removing part of the brain that causes the seizures.

Michael Chez, MD

“Knowing where seizures start in the brain provides us clues into what occurs during a seizure, what other conditions or symptoms may be seen, how they may affect someone and, most importantly, what treatment may be best for that seizure type,” says Michael Chez, M.D., a pediatric neurologist and epileptologist, and Sacramento regional director of pediatric epilepsy and research at the Sutter Neuroscience Institute.

“Life without seizures and improved quality of life is what specialists aim to provide epilepsy patients, through a treatment plan personalized to their particular type of epilepsy and seizures,” says Dr. Chez.

Two Sutter hospitals, California Pacific Medical Center and Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento are renowned for providing patients specialized Level 4 epilepsy care— a designation by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers—guided by leading-edge research. Sutter researchers are uncovering new clues about how epilepsy develops and how it can be treated more effectively.

Sutter examining new ways to ‘map’ and monitor brain activity

Epilepsy is usually diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) testing. Those techniques are also used to regularly monitor brain activity in people with the illness. Sutter researchers are studying the use of novel neuroimaging techniques to visualize and track the brain’s electrical activity in people with epilepsy.

For patients with refractory epilepsy (in whom medications are not adequately controlling seizures), a new “high-density” EEG machine is being tested to locate precisely where a patient’s seizures originate in the brain.

“Use of these high-density or high-array EEG machines can help dramatically accelerate research and patient care by identifying the focal point of a seizure,” says Kenneth Laxer, M.D. a researcher in the Sutter Pacific Epilepsy Program at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC).

With more than 40 years’ experience in epilepsy research, Dr. Laxer is renowned for studying neuroimaging techniques including magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the evaluation and management of the illness. With high-density EEGs, the patient wears a net over their head, and the brain’s electrical activity is recorded from 250-plus electrodes. The recordings are combined with the patient’s own high-resolution MRI scan to help localize the seizure focus. Surgeons use these precise images to remove the section of the brain that’s causing the seizures.

“If we pinpoint that abnormal area, we can remove a smaller portion of the abnormal brain tissue and therefore decrease the risk of serious complications from the surgery,” says Dr. Laxer. He notes that 50-70% of patients who undergo a focal resection may become seizure free. “Most of these patients remain on seizure medications, frequently at reduced dosages; however, the goal of surgery is to bring the epilepsy under control—not to stop epilepsy medication use. Patients who undergo such surgeries typically experience improved quality of life.” Stay tuned later this month for Part 2 of this series on Sutter epilepsy research, which will include information on neuromodulation and anti-epileptic medications.

Stay tuned later this month for Part 2 of this series describing epilepsy research at Sutter.

References: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/epilepsy/about/fast-facts.htm 2. Epilepsy Foundation. https://www.epilepsy.com/learn/types-seizures/refractory-seizures SAN .

Expectant Mom Suffers Massive Stroke: How a Health Network Saved Her and Her Baby

Posted on Oct 25, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Expanding Access, Innovation, Neuroscience, Pediatric Care, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Women's Services

Just two days from delivering her third child, Vivian Dos Santos suffered an intracerebral hemorrhage – a life-threatening stroke. Watch her amazing story, with details on how an integrated health network saves and blesses lives, by viewing the following video. You may want some tissues handy just in case …

For more on her story, and to view an infographic on Sutter’s integrated system, go to www.sutterhealth.org/newsroom/can-expect-integrated-network.

Donated ‘Sutter Trees’ Shade Former Burn Zone

Posted on Oct 14, 2019 in Affiliates, People, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa

To make way for Sutter Santa Rosa’s expansion, mature shrubs and ‘Sutter Trees’ were recently dug up and replanted in the Larkfield neighborhood.

SANTA ROSA, Calif. –When Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital broke ground in late September on its new, major expansion, Brad Sherwood attended the ceremony in his official role as a local school board member. He’s also vice president of the Larkfield Resilience Fund, a nonprofit dedicated to helping support neighbors in the hard-hit Larkfield Community near the hospital.

The devastating Tubbs fire that swept through Santa Rosa on Oct. 9, 2017 destroyed 1,700 Larkfield homes, including Sherwood’s. Today, the neighborhood is only 15% reconstructed.

Typically, residents find that to rebuild their houses and return to their neighborhood, they’ve already stretched their insurance dollars. They couldn’t afford to put in nice yards, too. So they come home to a neighborhood with no landscaping, no trees. No shade. No gardens.

“The fire took out everything,” says Sherwood, who works for the Sonoma County Water Agency. “Before, we had a neighborhood filled with trees that been here for more than 50 years. The fire made the whole community look like a moonscape.

“At the groundbreaking for Sutter Santa Rosa’s new three-story hospital tower, I noticed quite a few mature live oaks and Japanese maples that were going to be dug up and displaced by the new expansion. I thought, ‘Let’s transplant those trees.’”

Leaders from Sutter Health immediately agreed to help by donating several dozen trees and shrubs: mature coastal live oaks and Japanese maple trees, as well as camellia bushes and other shrubbery.

A donated ‘Sutter Tree’ is replanted in the Larkfield neighborhood of Santa Rosa.

“We call them the Sutter Trees,” says Sherwood.

The donation of the trees is only one way that Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital gives back to neighbors who are still recovering from the wildfires of two years ago—and one way that Sutter Health gives back to the communities it serves.

Working with Sutter Santa Rosa’s chief engineer, Jeffery Miller, as well as Aaction Rents equipment rental company and Image Tree Services, community volunteers moved and transplanted the trees within 24 hours of the hospital’s groundbreaking ceremony.

A young Larkfield couple who just moved back into their newly rebuilt home received one of the Sutter Trees. Down the street, an 84-year-old widow received a tree and shrubbery. So did a young family who just returned.

“We are rebuilding our community in a resilient way,” says Sherwood. “And Sutter Health is playing a key role.”

Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital Breaks Ground on Major Expansion to Meet Growing Needs of the Community

Posted on Sep 20, 2019 in Community Benefit, Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa

3-story expansion, plus a 10,000-square-foot renovation, will add 40 private room hospital beds, treatment areas in the emergency department and additional surgical suites

SANTA ROSA, Calif.Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital today broke ground on a major expansion and renovation to enhance access to acute hospital services and continue to meet the evolving needs of the growing community..

 

The $158 million investment, made possible through Sutter’s integrated network, will add more than 67,000 square feet of space to help support the health and healing of patients across multiple departments and services.

Listen to KCBS radio’s story about the groundbreaking.

“We have a long history of providing quality, innovative care to our community,” said Michael Purvis, CEO of Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital. “This expansion project will enhance our ability to provide coordinated healthcare and help us meet the growing needs of Sonoma County patients for years to come.”

Expansion and Renovation Plans
Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital opened in 2014 and is now starting its second phase of construction. The building expansion is expected to be complete and open for patient care in 2022, with both growth and renovation plans focused on enhancing access to heavily used services, including:

  • A new three-story wing to the east side of the existing hospital will include the addition of 40 licensed private-room beds, two operating rooms, an endoscopy unit, 20 intensive care unit beds and 11 post-anesthesia care unit bays.
  • The project also includes renovation of 10,713 square feet in the existing hospital to add nine emergency department exam rooms, expanded dietary service, expanded lab/blood bank, as well as renovation of a central processing unit to support the expanded facility.
  • The expansion builds on Sutter’s commitment to the environment and energy independence – the new building will also leverage the hospital’s recently installed solar panels and will be LEED Gold Certified.

Click here for more information on the expansion and renovation plans for Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital.

Ground is officially broken for the Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital Expansion project.

Groundbreaking Ceremony Marked by Local Elected Officials
Joining CEO Michael Purvis at the groundbreaking event to celebrate the hospital expansion were Sonoma County Supervisor James Gore; Windsor Town Council Mayor Dominic Foppoli; Steve Plamann, president of the Mark West Area Chamber of Commerce; Lorene Romero, president & CEO of the Windsor Chamber of Commerce; and Peter Rumble, CEO of the Santa Rosa Metro Chamber of Commerce.

“Sutter Health’s commitment to Sonoma County and our values is evident in every aspect of this expansion. This isn’t just about creating greater access to high-quality care for our residents – it’s about being environmentally conscious, forward-looking and community-focused,” said Gore.

About Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital

Sutter also cares for the larger community in ways that stretch beyond the walls of the hospital. In the past three years, Sutter Health has annually provided over $26.6 million in charity, uncompensated care, and other community benefits to indigent, uninsured, and underinsured residents of Sonoma County. Sutter partners to provide financial support to serve 12 local community organizations, including Social Advocates for Youth and the Center of Well-Being, organizations providing homeless support services, counseling and career services to youth, and educational health and wellness programs to families in our community.

Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, part of the not-for-profit, integrated Sutter Health network, has a long, proud history of providing high quality care in Sonoma County and beyond. Because of an unwavering focus on health and healing the hospital is consistently ranked as one of the top hospitals in the region.

One of Nation’s Top Residency Programs is Magnet for Future Family Doctors

Posted on Apr 12, 2019 in People, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency Program Selects 12 Graduates for Class of 2022

SANTA ROSA-Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (SSRRH) Family Medicine Residency Program announced its 2019 incoming class who will graduate the program in 2022.  Twelve of the nation’s top medical school graduates were selected from 747 applicants for this three-year program. The nationally recognized Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency program is one of 450 family medicine training programs in the United States and has trained hundreds of family physicians since its inception in 1938.

The 12 graduates who will begin the training program in July came from medical schools across the country; Drexel University, University of California Irvine, Texas Tech University, University of California Davis, Michigan State, University of Washington, Western University, Geisel School of Medicine, University of Massachusetts, Wayne State University, University of Maryland, and University of Wisconsin. They each come with an impressive background of academic achievement and community service.

The residency program is a critical strategic healthcare asset in confronting the emerging physician shortage in Sonoma County. The residency has been the largest single source of family physicians to Sonoma County for over 70+ years.  Residency graduates comprise nearly half of family physicians in Sonoma County. They fill private practices, community clinics, and large medical groups such as Sutter Medical Group of the Redwoods, The Permanente Medical Group, local community health centers, Sonoma County Health Services and leadership positions throughout the medical community.

The Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency is under the sponsorship of Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (SSRRH). To provide a broader base of support for the residency and optimize learning experiences for residents, SSRRH engaged Santa Rosa Community Health Centers, Kaiser Permanente, Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital and or St. Josephs Health as affiliate partners in the community.

About the Sutter Health Family Medicine Residency Program

With the initiation of formal training in general practice dating back to 1938, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (and formerly Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa) has an established tradition of excellent training of family physicians with the strong support of community physicians and specialists. In 1969, the program became affiliated with what has since become the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.