Sutter Delta Medical Center

Diabetes Getting You Down? Class Offers Answers Close to Home

Posted on Oct 22, 2019 in Affiliates, Expanding Access, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Wellness

ANTIOCH, Calif. — The farther outside of metropolitan areas people live, the harder it can be for them to access healthcare services, in large part due to the time and money it takes to travel outside of the community for care. Diabetes education is no exception.

Now, people with diabetes can access the most up-to-date and accurate diabetes education without leaving the area. Recently, Sutter Delta Medical Center’s Outpatient Diabetes Center achieved accreditation by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), joining other affiliated hospitals within the Sutter Health integrated network of care.

Shahla Cano, R.D., a registered dietician, certified diabetes educator and board certified advance diabetes manager says the accreditation is important because, “We want to make sure our patients don’t have to travel for diabetes education. Forty-five to 50 percent of patients here in Eastern Contra Costa County have diabetes—and those are only the ones who know about it. Unfortunately, there are not that many resources available to a population that is so critically impacted.”

Shahla Cano, R.D., CDE, BC-ADM

Sutter Delta’s accreditation by AADE means that the program operates based on evidence-based guidelines, offers approved educational materials, and the educators are accredited.

Cano says that all too often people don’t realize the dire consequences of unmanaged diabetes. More than that, people with Type 2 diabetes can easily fall into a “shame and blame” trap and end up feeling guilty, which impacts their motivation to seek care. She wants to see more people in the community get educated on what she calls the “basics of diabetes management.”

“It’s about the little things: taking the proper medications, taking care of your eyes and feet, and seeing your doctor,” she says.

Effective diabetes management is a team effort. It requires patient participation, effective education and communication with clinicians. Physicians don’t have the time to spend hours with individual patients, which is why Cano says resources like the Outpatient Diabetes Center are critical.

Sutter Delta’s accreditation is important for several reasons according to Cano. “The accreditation is recognized by the physicians. We have to follow certain standards. And it pushes us to follow evidence-based care. What we say to people carries a lot of weight, and if the information you give isn’t evidence-based, it could cause major harm. What I teach my patients is not something I am making up—it is based on years of research.”

Cano is proud of the accreditation because it helps Sutter Delta better serve the local community by providing easier access to diabetes education. “Diabetes education is a challenge, but we have to try because one person could make the difference. I want to give it everything I have because it could make a difference in one person’s life.”

Cano has a wealth of information she’s eager to share with members of the community living with diabetes, from diabetes management tips to information about glucose monitoring devices that may be covered by insurance.

The free Living Well with Diabetes Class is held once a month from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Sutter Delta Medical Center Education Center at 3901 Lone Tree Way in Antioch. The class covers:

  • Weight management
  • Stress reduction
  • Blood sugar control
  • Complication reduction

The class also includes a $5 lunch voucher for the hospital’s cafeteria.

Those who would like the schedule or are interested in registered can call the center at (925) 779-3605.

Reducing Childhood Obesity One Family at a Time

Posted on Aug 7, 2019 in Innovation, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

New Program Aims to Help East Contra Costa County Kids Achieve and Maintain Healthy Weight

 

ANTIOCH, Calif. –Making sure kids eat a balanced diet and maintain a proper weight can be a difficult task. Especially if the child is overweight, obese or a picky eater.

In Contra Costa County the problem is especially acute. Kidsdata.org, a program at the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, compiled data in 2018 by grade level and found that in the county 36.1 percent of fifth graders, 35.7 percent of seventh graders and 33.4 percent of ninth graders are overweight or obese. According to the Centers for Disease Control, overweight or obese children are at high risk of becoming overweight adolescents and adults, placing them at risk of developing chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes later in life. They are also more prone to develop stress, sadness, and low self-esteem.

Richard Singer, M.D., a pediatrician with Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation (SEBMF) based in Brentwood, had become increasingly concerned about the overweight children he sees in his practice and the lack of nutritional counseling services available in eastern Contra Costa County.

So after careful planning, Dr. Singer recently started a pediatric weight management program at outpatient pediatric offices in Antioch and Brentwood. As part of the program, a registered dietician on the staff at Sutter Delta Medical Center sees patients one day a week at an SEBMF care center.

“There is an epidemic of childhood obesity and all of the complications associated with obesity,” Dr. Singer said. “Our community needs resources to help intervene and improve the quality of life of these children. The pediatric dietician will help parents and their children make better food choices as well as providing ongoing support and helping to monitor their progress.”

In June, Elika Vargas, a registered dietitian at Sutter Delta Medical Center, began meeting with parents and their children on Mondays, either in the SEBMF primary care clinic in Antioch or Brentwood. Children from 2 to 18 years of age are referred to her by primary care physicians.

Vargas reviews the child’s medical history and assesses the child’s eating patterns. Her goal is not to put the child on a diet but to guide the child and the parents on how to eat healthy meals. She also asks the parents and child about physical activity, as lack of exercise contributes significantly to being overweight or obese. Follow-up care is important to assess adherence to nutrition recommendations and weight trends.

“The idea is to promote a healthy lifestyle and gradual weight loss, and to teach families about nutrition so they can make these decisions on their own,” Vargas said. “I let them know why they should be eating more whole grains, fruits and vegetables to get the right nutrition.”

Many barriers to healthy eating exist. The availability of convenience and processed foods, larger portion sizes and lack of physical activity are some of the contributors to obesity. Families are busy and eating fast food may be easier than preparing a balanced meal.

It can be difficult to get children to eat fruits and vegetables. Parents have to be willing to be role models by following their own healthy lifestyle with good nutrition and plenty of exercise.

Some of her advice to parents on how to help children adopt a healthy lifestyle includes:

  • Cut out sugary desserts and juices or try fruit-infused water.
  • Avoid processed and convenience foods. Cook meals at home so children are more likely to have enough vegetables and whole grains.
  • Encourage kids to get involved in preparing meals or in helping with grocery shopping.
  • Offer a variety of fruits and vegetables with different colors, flavors and textures.

“With kids you have to offer healthy choices such as fruit and vegetables multiple times,” Vargas said. “It’s persistence and communication.”

 

 

 

 

 

Cuddly Toys Ease Hospitalized Kids’ Stress

Posted on Jun 13, 2019 in Scroll Images, Sutter Delta Medical Center

Sutter Delta Auxiliary Provides Comfort for Kids

ANTIOCH, CALIF. –Imagine being a kid at the hospital—waiting for an X-ray or to go into surgery. A visit to the hospital can be nerve-racking, even for adults. For kids, it can be daunting.

“Kids waiting for X-rays and procedures were very nervous and needed something to do with their hands,” says Joy Burge, a member of the Sutter Delta Medical Center Auxiliary.

Sutter Delta Medical Center Auxiliary Volunteers Allen Hansen, DD Rivera and Joy Burge show off the great toys for children waiting for surgery or a procedure at the hospital.

That’s when a brilliant idea struck, and recently the Auxiliary has partnered with the Women’s & Children’s Services department to provide age-appropriate toys for Sutter Delta’s youngest patients.

“We…ordered 24 teddy bears that are five to six inches long, dressed in hoodies that talk and laugh,” Burge says.

The Auxiliary also is ordering “squishy” toys—soft, “squishable” toys similar to the classic stress ball. Made of polyurethane foam, the toys allow kids—and adults—to squeeze away their stress over and over again, and the toy will still return to its original form.

“Every time people buy something at the Sutter Delta gift shop, buy tickets at one of our [Auxiliary] raffles, or get a treat at a bake sale, it goes straight back to the hospital departments,” Burge says. “Every little bit helps.”

For more information about Sutter Delta Medical Center’s Auxiliary, click here.

Sutter Delta Medical Center Welcomes New CEO

Posted on Jan 23, 2019 in Affiliates, People, Scroll Images, Sutter Delta Medical Center

SACRAMENTO, Calif.  – Sherie C. Hickman is the new chief executive officer of Sutter Delta Medical Center in Antioch. Hickman began her new role on Jan. 2.

Hickman comes to Sutter Delta from Novato Community Hospital, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network of care, where she served as administrator for two years.

“Sutter Delta Medical Center has a rich history of serving the healthcare needs of Antioch and the surrounding Delta communities,” says Hickman, “I am energized by the opportunity to work with Sutter Delta staff and physicians to enhance the well-being of the community.”

Hickman brings to this position a background in healthcare leadership that spans the continuum of care: outpatient care, hospital administration, post-acute care services and health plan administration. These roles included chief operating officer at Novant Health/Presbyterian Healthcare System in North Carolina, Kaiser Foundation Hospitals and Health Plan in Walnut Creek and Richmond, and Dignity Health/Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City prior to her administrator position at Sutter’s Novato Community Hospital.

Hickman is a fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE), a member and past president of the California Association of Healthcare Leaders; a member of the Women Healthcare Executives group of Northern California, and of the National Association of Health Services Executives. In 2007, she received the ACHE’s Regents Award for Outstanding Leadership in Healthcare Administration, and in 2018 received the North Bay Business Journal’s Business Woman of the Year award.

Hickman earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Washington, Seattle, and a master’s degree in hospital administration from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. She has completed advanced leadership programs at the University of Southern California, Stanford University and Harvard University Business School.

Sutter Delivers on New Year’s, Including West Coast’s First Baby of 2019

Posted on Jan 3, 2019 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter Lakeside Hospital, Sutter Maternity and Surgery Center, Santa Cruz, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Uncategorized, Women's Services

ROSEVILLE — The first baby born in 2019 on the West Coast was delivered just eight seconds after midnight at Sutter Roseville Medical Center. Alan Armenta was born at 8 pounds, 15 ounces to Patricia Romero and Juan Armenta of Elk Grove right at midnight. This is a rare achievement, as the odds are that only about a half-dozen babies would be born during the first minute of any day in the U.S.

Patricia Romero gave birth to Alan at just seconds past midnight on New Year’s Day at Sutter Roseville Medical Center. His proud sister is Allison.

Alan was the first of dozens of babies born on New Year’s Day at Sutter hospitals. Every year, Sutter Health’s birth specialists help deliver more than 40,000 babies across Northern California – and every year, a good handful of those babies arrive in the wee hours of Jan. 1, making them the first babies of the year in their communities.

Delivering little Alan was Sutter Medical Group’s Amy Riley, M.D., who was called just 20 minutes before midnight for the delivery, and baby Alan entered the world very quickly after that.

“You can’t predict it. Sometimes moms push one time, and sometimes moms push for two hours,” Dr. Riley said. “So Patricia pushed one time and out he came, just seconds after midnight.”

At that point, the staff cheered, put on New Year’s party hats and served sparkling cider to the new parents. In addition, the staff gave the family a gift basket – actually an infant bathtub full of goodies for the baby, including blankets, washcloths, bath soap, lotion and other baby care essentials.

While Dad was mostly happy that Mom and Alan were perfectly healthy, Patricia said she was excited to have a New Year’s baby.

“He got lucky,” Patricia said. “We all did.”

Here are a few more of Sutter’s 2019 New Year’s babies: Read More