Sutter Davis Hospital

Hungry People Fed through Food Waste Reduction Pilot

Posted on Sep 1, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Eden Medical Center, Innovation, Memorial Hospital, Los Banos, Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, People, Scroll Images, Sutter Amador Hospital, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Sutter Solano Medical Center, Sutter Tracy Hospital

35,000 meals donated in first seven months of project

SACRAMENTO, Calif. –In its first seven months, a pilot project involving 14 Sutter hospitals reduced food waste and fed the hungry by donating nearly 35,000 meals to 17 local nonprofits. The effort comes at a critical time as increasing numbers of people experience food insecurity due to the pandemic-induced economic downturn.

Last January, 10 hospitals in Sutter Health’s integrated network launched a collaboration with nonprofit Health Care Without Harm to implement the program, which is partially funded by a grant from the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) through California Climate Investments. Over the summer, an additional four Sutter hospitals joined in Sutter’s efforts.

“From our earliest days, Sutter Health’s network has provided access to high-quality, affordable medical care in our facilities – but we’ve also been deeply invested in the health and wellbeing of our broader communities,” says Chief Medical Officer Stephen H. Lockhart, M.D., Ph.D., executive sponsor of Sutter Health’s Environmental Stewardship program. “The teams behind this project with Copia and Health Care Without Harm are putting our values into action by leveraging innovation to not only reduce our environmental footprint, but also help feed community members in need.”

The work is powered by a technology platform designed by San Francisco-based Copia – a zero waste and hunger technology platform that allows food service employees to measure and prevent food waste while seamlessly donating all unsold or unserved edible excess food. Hospital food services workers measure daily food waste and submit their edible food donations in one streamlined process through Copia’s software application on mobile tablets. Copia’s mobile app then automatically dispatches drivers to pick up and deliver the food to local non-profits feeding food insecure populations.

And local really does mean local in this case – the average distance donated food traveled from the hospitals to someone who needed it was 3.4 miles.

In its first week in the program, Sutter Delta Medical Center recovered nearly 140 pounds of surplus food from the hospital—enough for 116 meals for Love a Child Missions, which serves homeless women and children in Contra Costa County, and Light Ministries Pentecostal Church of God, which serves meals to needy families in Antioch.

“This is an exciting partnership,” says Sutter Delta’s assistant administrator Tim Bouslog. “We’ve always had a vested interest in sustainability at our hospital, and the positive impact on the community during these difficult times makes this a great step forward.”

Another program benefit? The food donations efforts have helped Sutter reduce carbon emissions by 185,000 pounds and saved 15 million gallons of water!

Says Maria Lewis, director of Food and Nutrition Services at Sutter’s Eden Medical Center, “Eden’s first donation provided 45 meals to The Salvation Army in Hayward. This one donation not only consisted of 55 pounds of perfectly edible food, but also saved 241 pounds of CO2 emissions. We are humbled to be able to support our community, as well as help preserve our environment in the same process.”

“Over the first six months of this pilot project, we have gained valuable insight into how to contribute to community health, reduce waste and be good stewards of our own resources,” says Jack Breezee, regional food and nutrition services director for Sutter’s Valley Area. “I can only look forward to what we will learn over the pilot’s remaining year, and how we can build on these successes to serve our patients and communities.”

“Food waste among hospitals is a solvable problem,” says Komal Ahmad, founder of Copia. “If every hospital in the U.S. partnered with Copia, we could provide more than 250 million meals each year to people in need and save hundreds of millions of dollars in purchasing and production of food. Copia is thrilled to partner with Sutter Health to lead the healthcare industry in filling the food insecurity gap and building community resilience, especially during a time when insecurity has never been higher.”

Participating Sutter hospitals are Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Eden Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, Memorial Hospital Los Banos, Memorial Medical Center, Sutter Amador Hospital, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Center for Psychiatry, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Sutter Solano Medical Center and Sutter Tracy Community Hospital.

Feeling Safe Amid Uncertainty

Posted on Jun 16, 2020 in Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital

Stephanie Myers & Garry Douglas, Sweden 2019

Garry Douglas is one who can appreciate a journey. He made his way from just outside the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Reservation near Mount Pleasant, Michigan, to Northern California in the early 1970s. He explored the majesty and mystery of national forests and grasslands through his job with the U.S. Forest Service. He travels the world with his wife, Stephanie Myers, to visit friends he’s made over the years. But nothing could have prepared Douglas for the journey he endured earlier this year: a diagnosis of COVID-19.

Douglas spent a week in Glasgow, Scotland, visiting a longtime friend before heading to Cambridge, England, for several days and then making the trek to London. He returned home to Winters, a small town in rural Yolo County, on March 16. He started to feel unwell a few days after returning, plagued by headaches and fatigue. After consulting with his physician, Carla Kakutani, M.D., Douglas visited an urgent care clinic where his flu test came back negative. His symptoms took a turn for the worse in the days ahead. The 68 year-old felt disoriented. Shaking with chills one moment, his temperature ratcheting up to 103 degrees the next. On March 30, he came to Sutter Davis Hospital’s emergency department and was eventually admitted.

For Douglas, his recollection of the journey pauses here for a moment. His exhaustion, coupled with the eventual sedation he went under in the intensive care unit, suspends time for him. But Myers picks up the tale – albeit secondhand. She wasn’t allowed to be with Douglas in the hospital because of the visitor limitations in place to limit the spread of coronavirus and protect patients and staff. Conversations with emergency department staff, and Carly Grovhoug, M.D., Myers’ primary care doctor, who works closely with Dr. Kakutani, act like the mile markers toward an unknown destination.

But the path eventually became clearer. The Sutter Davis ICU team was always responsive to her calls any time of the day to check on his status. Social worker Katie Tenerelli was also a “godsend” according to Myers.

“She talked through a lot of things with me, told me what he looked like,” she said.

Myers was eventually able to see him firsthand through the power of video visits with the help of staff as well. Initially, since Douglas was on a ventilator, verbal communication was limited at best.

“He could hear me, but he was out of it. I’d say, ‘Garry, open your eyes,” she said with a laugh.

A visit to Lake Superior, 2019

By the end of the second week, Douglas’ condition improved. He was growing more alert and eventually was removed from the ventilator. He always considered himself relatively healthy and active. But now his activity was limited to “belly band” exercises. Technically known as high-frequency chest wall oscillation, the procedure helps improve lung function. While connected to an airway clearance device, Douglas laid on his back with an elastic band around his abdomen that vibrated 25 minutes at a time. There were also the short-distance field trips—within his room—from the bed to the chair and back again.

“I was a total weakling since I hadn’t moved in two weeks,” he said.

But Douglas was moved by how the thoughtful gestures of Sutter Davis’ ICU staff continued. From the simplest acts of grabbing him coffee to hanging up photos from he and Myers’ wedding or some from their travels made him feel more comfortable, more at home.

Once Douglas was healthy and strong enough to go home, the entire Sutter Davis Hospital team pulled out all the stops. From the second floor on down to the first, through the lobby and even out the hospital’s main entrance, employees lined up for what seemed like miles to applaud his recovery and wish him well.

Douglas was taking his own victory lap to the cheers of adoring fans. It was a salute suited for a hero. And in the eyes of the Sutter Davis team, he was. At this unprecedented time with a lot of unknowns and unpredictability with the virus, he was just as much of a symbol of hope and perseverance to them as they had been for him.

Douglas and Myers are back at home now, adjusting to the new normal. Douglas had a fairly detailed after-care plan that included a home health care nurse and physical therapy visits twice a week coordinated through Sutter Care at Home. Plus, he had a series of other medications and vitamins to take. He is making progress every day and relishes the comforts of home, but reflects back fondly on those he met at Sutter Davis Hospital throughout this uncharted territory of COVID-19.

“It was such a good feeling…to me it just showed how caring they were,” he said.

Sutter Health Park Launches Health Events with ‘Light the Night’

Posted on Nov 4, 2019 in Affiliates, Community Benefit, People, Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento

WEST SACRAMENTO, Calif. – At the newly renamed Sutter Health Park, Sutter employees, clinicians and community members gathered to support a cause close to the heart of many: leukemia and lymphoma.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Greater Sacramento Area Chapter’s “Light the Night” event was the first Sutter-sponsored community event at Sutter Health Park, home of the Sacramento River Cats. As the presenting sponsor of “Light the Night,” Sutter Health was represented by members of its executive leadership team, cancer specialists and hundreds of employees, who were there to celebrate the occasion and help shine light on the fight against life-threatening blood diseases.

“We had an incredible turnout, not just from Sutter employees and their families, but the entire community,” said Michael Carroll, M.D., medical director of the Blood & Marrow Transplant Program at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento. “This Light the Night event helped to bring further awareness to the hundreds of thousands of patients with leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma and other blood disorders. More importantly, the event raised funds to support patients and their families as well as laboratory and clinical research. Together, we can help find a cure for these diseases.”

When Sutter Health announced the naming rights to the home of Triple-A Baseball’s Sacramento River Cats, it announced a partnership with the River Cats and the greater community to bring more health-related awareness and services to the area. With this premier event, Sutter Health Park is now serving as a community gathering space that actively promotes health and wellness throughout the year. Other plans include health and wellness programming and local events from walks and runs, to health screenings, flu immunization clinics and more. During the season, attendees will see even more cause-related nights and nonprofit community partners featured and supported in their mission and activities.

“Thank you to everyone who joined in and supported Sacramento’s Light the Night,” said President and CEO of Sutter Health Sarah Krevans. “Sutter Health was proud to sponsor this very special event and walk alongside thousands of families, friends, colleagues, patients, caregivers and community members to support and remember all those touched by leukemia and lymphoma. The light, warmth and support everyone generated at the event together delivers hope, and the thoughtful donations of so many people will help advance life-saving research to benefit cancer patients and their families.”

For more information on the Sutter Health-River Cats collaboration, go to this story in the Newsroom.

Show executive leadership at event
Sutter Health Senior Vice President Jill Ragsdale and CEO Sarah Krevans helped to ”Light the Night” at the newly renamed Sutter Health Park Saturday evening.

Expectant Mom Suffers Massive Stroke: How a Health Network Saved Her and Her Baby

Posted on Oct 25, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Expanding Access, Innovation, Neuroscience, Pediatric Care, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Women's Services

Just two days from delivering her third child, Vivian Dos Santos suffered an intracerebral hemorrhage – a life-threatening stroke. Watch her amazing story, with details on how an integrated health network saves and blesses lives, by viewing the following video. You may want some tissues handy just in case …

For more on her story, and to view an infographic on Sutter’s integrated system, go to www.sutterhealth.org/newsroom/can-expect-integrated-network.

What You Can Expect from an Integrated Network

Posted on Sep 30, 2019 in Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Vivian Dos Santos lost consciousness at her home in Davis, Calif., just days away from delivering her third child, Stella. She woke up at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento – more than 15 miles away – with bandages on her head and no longer pregnant. She was unaware that care teams at two Sutter network facilities had come together to save her life and care for her baby after she suffered a sudden and severe stroke. Ultimately, Vivian’s care would include three Sutter network facilities coordinating an emergency caesarean section, lifesaving neurosurgery and extensive rehabilitation.

Vivian Dos Santos and her family say thanks to some of her caregivers at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento.

The coordinated care that Sutter provided to the Dos Santos family is a testament to our integrated healthcare network and the coordination that occurs between multiple medical facilities, practitioners, and services to ensure that patients receive timely, high quality care when they need it most. (To view an infographic on Sutter’s integrated network and Vivian’s journey, click here.)

Vivian’s first sign of trouble came on Dec. 31, 2018. As she prepared to ring in the New Year with her husband and their two young sons, she began experiencing an excruciating headache. Shortly after she suddenly lost consciousness, an ambulance rushed Vivian to Sutter Davis Hospital’s Emergency Department.

There, doctors determined that Vivian was suffering from an intracerebral hemorrhage – a life-threatening brain bleed. Vivian’s obstetrician and physician at Sutter Davis consulted with a neurosurgeon at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento (SMCS) and ultimately decided an immediate emergency C-section was the safest treatment approach for Vivian and her baby. The Sutter Davis care team stabilized Vivian while delivering baby Stella, and then airlifted Vivian to SMCS for immediate neurosurgery.

During surgery, stroke experts at SMCS successfully stopped the bleeding. After Vivian recovered from surgery, she was transferred to the Sutter Rehabilitation Institution in Roseville where she received advanced rehabilitation care. Meanwhile, Sutter Davis’ labor and delivery team helped Vivian’s husband care for the couple’s healthy newborn daughter, Stella.

Our team’s ability to develop and implement a treatment plan spanning multiple facilities — which remained in constant communication and included comprehensive access to Vivian’s medical records — proved critical to saving Vivian and Stella’s lives.

“When you have a single network, it really improves the communication,” said Dr. Rudolph Schrot, Vivian’s neurosurgeon. “You have a very rapid transfer from one facility to another, from Sutter Davis to Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, to the Sutter Rehab Institute. There’s a constant thread that goes through this patient’s experience, where there’s immediate access to medical records, communication between providers, and also a very rapid response.”

Sutter’s integrated system helps provide patients like Vivian and Stella with qualified, highly-trained medical staff throughout a life-threatening medical emergency. The system allows for smoother transitions between inpatient and outpatient services, multi-specialty teams that can address patient care holistically while reducing complications and, in turn, lower hospital readmission rates and total cost of care for patients. The coordinated care model also allows teams to share ideas, improve communication and spread best practices across locations – ultimately contributing to improved care, a more user-friendly experience, and better patient outcomes.

“Coordinating our efforts across facilities, doctors, teams and locations is crucial to providing patient-centered care throughout a patient’s journey,” said Steve Lockhart, M.D., Sutter Health’s Chief Medical Officer. “Our integrated network enables us to be attuned to a patient’s needs and provide personalized care from inpatient to outpatient, preventive to rehabilitative, hospice to home healthcare.”

Lockhart continues, “At Sutter, we believe ready access to multiple types of patient-centered care from well-informed and highly coordinated providers sets integrated care networks apart. This connectivity allows Sutter to provide innovative, quality care to more than 3 million Californians. Our integrated system ultimately helps improve patient outcomes, resulting in happier, healthier families and communities.”

Sutter Health a Leading Site Enrolling Patients to the PARTNER 3 Trial for Treatment of Aortic Value Stenosis

Posted on Feb 28, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Cardiac, Eden Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Novato Community Hospital, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Gould Medical Foundation, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Medical Foundation, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO – Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a minimally invasive procedure done without open-heart surgery to replace a narrowed aortic valve. The procedure is one of several research breakthroughs and interventional cardiology advances being pioneered at Sutter Health through the research of David Daniels, MD, an interventional cardiologist at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center and California Pacific Medical Center who directs Sutter’s Structural Heart Program, and collaborators across Sutter.

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