Palo Alto Medical Foundation

Eight Sutter Medical Network Organizations Achieve IHA Top Quality Honors

Posted on May 20, 2019 in Carousel, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation, Sutter Gould Medical Foundation, Sutter Medical Foundation, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation

SACRAMENTO, Calif. —Integrated Healthcare Association (IHA) has recognized eight Sutter Medical Network (SMN) organizations for reaching a high level of quality care for Medicare Advantage patients.

The following five SMN organizations achieved 4.5-star ratings for performance across a subset of 12 quality measures during the 2017 reporting year:

  • Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation – Sutter East Bay Medical Group
  • Sutter Gould Medical Foundation – Gould Medical Group
  • Sutter Medical Foundation – Sutter Medical Group
  • Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation – Sutter Medical Group of the Redwoods
  • Sutter Palo Alto Medical Foundation – Palo Alto Foundation Medical Group

Three other Sutter Medical Network organizations received 4-star ratings:

  • Brown & Toland Physicians
  • Central Valley Medical Group
  • Sutter Palo Alto Medical Foundation – Mills-Peninsula Division/Mills-Peninsula Medical Group

Nearly 200 physician organizations participate in IHA’s Medicare Advantage Measurement Program. IHA is a statewide, multi-stakeholder leadership group that promotes quality improvement, accountability and affordability in healthcare. IHA collects clinical quality data and provides it to the Office of Patient Advocate (OPA) for the Health Care Quality Report Card. OPA considers physician organizations “very good” for achieving 4.5 and 4-star ratings.

To learn more, visit the OPA website.

SMN consists of the Sutter medical foundations, their exclusively contracted medical groups, and contracted independent practice associations. These organizations agree to work collaboratively with the goal of achieving sustainable high quality outcomes and services at an affordable price.

Move-In Day is Near for San Francisco’s Newest Medical Office Building

Posted on May 8, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation, Women's Services

10-story facility integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care

SAN FRANCISCO –Sutter Health today announced the June 3 opening of Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation’s (SPMF) Van Ness and Geary medical office building (or MOB) at 1100 Van Ness Ave. The building, owned by Pacific Medical Buildings, is a 10-story, 250,000 sq. ft. facility located across the street from Sutter’s new CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital, which opened in March. More than 120 specialty physicians and clinicians from the Sutter Health network will occupy five floors of the building in the heart of San Francisco. The MOB completes the creation of a coordinated medical campus community that integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care.

The new Van Ness and Geary Medical Office Building (MOB) opens its doors on Monday, June 3. This 250,000 sq. ft. building completes a coordinated medical campus community that integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care.

Physicians and clinicians affiliated with SPMF, the Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) and California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) will occupy five floors. Private physicians will lease space on floors 7-10. Among the practice areas: advanced organ therapy (including transplant services), women’s services, medical and surgical specialty clinics, neurosciences, and cardiovascular services. In addition to a 383-spot underground parking garage, a Walgreens pharmacy is located on the street level. Lab and imaging facilities will be available by July 15. A 125-foot-long, staff-only tunnel connects the MOB with the hospital, completing the new medical campus community.

“Sutter’s Van Ness and Geary medical office building is designed to enhance convenience and access to high-quality care, as well as create an exceptional experience for patients, their families and friends,” said Kelvin Lam, M.D., Interim CEO for SPMF San Francisco and Marin. “The opening of this modern and centrally-located facility adds another world-class, multi-specialty healthcare center to the Sutter portfolio. This medical office building incorporates a powerful healing environment with an integrated continuum of services to support the community for decades to come.”

A truly integrated healthcare network

Sutter’s integrated care model allows patients to access primary care in local neighborhoods and higher level specialty care at the new MOB and at other care centers throughout the Bay Area.  The CPMC Van Ness hospital serves as the hub for all consolidated inpatient facilities and outpatient services. With the completion of the MOB, the campus knits together hospital and emergency services, affiliated medical offices and specialty outpatient services – including convenient underground parking for patients.

The Sutter Health Newborn Connections program will be occupying space on the entry level of the building. From perinatal classes and lactation services to breastfeeding and baby supplies, Newborn Connections provides expecting families with a range of support from pregnancy to parenthood.

“We’ve been looking forward to the ‘birth’ of this vibrant space to provide families with easy access to all of CPMC’s Newborn Connections classes and services,” said Paula Sulkis, supervisor of the Newborn Connections program. “With Sutter’s new CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital located directly across the street, the need for mom, baby and new families to pop in and out of multiple facilities all over town just to make their appointments is eliminated.”

Designed to achieve LEED Silver certification, the MOB was constructed and operates in an environmentally conscious way.

The building will feature:

  • A reduction of water use by 40 percent with water efficient fixtures
  • An energy reduction of 35 percent through lighting control design
  • A 2-year contract to purchase at least 8 kwh/gsf of green power
  • 25 percent of materials made from recycled content
  • 75 percent of building waste diverted from landfill
  • Certified low-emitting materials used in furniture and no urea formaldehyde in any wood composites
  • Bike parking and storage as well as showers and storage rooms that encourage alternate transportation

By the numbers

  • Planning and design completed in July 2017
  • 250,000 sq. ft. total; 114,000 sq. ft. available for Sutter provider clinics
  • Capacity for 129 providers
  • 20,000 sq. ft. for Ancillary Services, including a lab, imaging and Newborn Connections
  • Six-level, subterranean parking structure, with 383 parking spaces and a staff-only tunnel that connects the building to the CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital

Services Offered

The medical office building features the following services from the Sutter Health Network:

  • Comprehensive neuroscience center
  • Cardiovascular services
  • Maternity and women’s health services
  • General and complex gastroenterology
  • Surgical specialties
  • Outpatient imaging
  • Advanced organ therapies (organ transplant)
  • Women’s ultrasound
  • Outpatient laboratory and imaging
  • Newborn Connections (support and lactation consulting for new parents)

PAMF Physician Honored With Distinguished Alumni Award from UC Santa Cruz

Posted on May 1, 2019 in Carousel, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, People, Scroll Images

SANTA CRUZ, Calf. – Congratulations to David Sofen, M.D., of PAMF Santa Cruz who was recently honored with a Distinguished Alumni Award from the Physical and Biological Sciences Division at University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC).

Dr. Sofen, an urgent care physician, earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from UCSC’s Kresge College in 1979. He was presented with the award at a dinner on Friday, April 26, 2019, along with two others honored at the Distinguished Graduate Alumni Award luncheon in Santa Cruz.

The UCSC division established the awards two years ago to honor graduates who have gone on to extraordinary accomplishments in diverse fields and whose careers are characterized by sustained and exemplary contributions to society through research, practice, education, policy, or service. Dr. Sofen’s acceptance letter noted that he was selected because he has “shown tremendous heart throughout his career, making Santa Cruz a better place to live.”

Dr. Sofen credits a UCSC internship in Guatemala with inspiring his career in medicine. “So here I am an undergraduate, I was catching babies or sewing people up, starting IVs… and then I thought, I like this. I think I’ll go to medical school,” he told a local newspaper.

He joined PAMF Santa Cruz in 1992. In addition to his role an urgent care physician, Dr. Sofen also has  served as medical director of patient experience. He helped developed and teach PAMFCARES, training for staff and clinicians on how to improve the patient experience through communication and empathy.

Dr. Sofen treats a patient in Haiti.

As many of his colleagues and patients know, Dr. Sofen regularly travels overseas and volunteers to provide care to people in remote areas. He has made one trip to Tanzania and he travels to Haiti once or twice a year with the nonprofit group Flying Doctors (Los Medicos Voladores), teaming up with American and Haitian doctors and dentists to provide care at mobile clinics.

Dr. Sofen received his medical degree from University of California at San Francisco and he completed a family medicine residency at Natividad Hospital in Salinas, followed by stints in emergency medicine and in local safety-net clinics from 1986 to 1992.

“David’s history tells the story of a primary care physician committed to the broader mission of health care and serving the underserved,” said Larry DeGhetaldi, M.D. Area CEO, PAMF Santa Cruz. “He embodies clinical excellence and deep compassion for the human experience.”

Dr. DeGhetaldi added: “UC Santa Cruz embeds in its graduates a commitment to service and the social responsibility of the physician/scientist. David exemplifies the fulfillment of that mission and receives this award from UCSC that closes the circle: to send university graduates into the world to do good and honor them when they finish the journey.”

Paul Koch, dean of UCSC’s Physical and Biological Sciences Division, said in a statement: “Beyond this tremendous work for our community, David has been a great partner for UC Santa Cruz, making PAMF one of the top internship sites for students in Human Biology and offering guest lectures. Through inspired leadership, teaching, and personal humility, he has applied the ethos of UC Santa Cruz to transform everyday care for Californians.”

The other two graduates to receive Distinguished Alumni Awards include Laura Helmuth, health, science and environment editor at The Washington Post, and Pamela Silver, professor of biochemistry and systems biology at Harvard Medical School.

For Volunteers, Rewards Come in Helping Patients –And Getting Smiles Back

Posted on Apr 11, 2019 in Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Scroll Images

Kelly Robutz, volunteer coordinator at PAMF’s Mountain View Center, shares a moment with volunteers Donald Holthaus and Noreen Ryker.

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — How would you like the most important task in your job to be providing that special touch that makes patients feel comfortable when they visit the doctor? To welcome them, smile at them, perhaps engage them in conversation, help with a wheelchair, give directions or arrange for a taxi?

Those are some of the high touch tasks performed by almost 150 volunteers who spend time at Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) offices in Mountain View, Palo Alto, Los Gatos, San Carlos and Sunnyvale. National Volunteer Week, observed April 7-13 this year, is a good time to highlight the impact of volunteer service and the power of volunteers to brighten a patient’s day, share their compassion and help build stronger communities.

Donald Holthaus and Noreen Ryker, two longtime volunteers, say it’s one of the best jobs in the world.

“I am so very happy that I am a volunteer,’’ said Holthaus, a retired engineer who has helped out at PAMF’s Sunnyvale Center since 2012. “I meet a lot of wonderful people here – -they are just like old friends.”

Noreen Ryker, who retired from banking, has been a volunteer at the Mountain View Center for twelve years.

“If patients want to talk, then you talk a bit,” Ryker said of her role at the front desk. “If they don’t, you smile and sometimes they look downcast, but then they smile back. It makes it all worthwhile.’’

Ryker, Holthaus and members of their families are patients at PAMF, and they say volunteering is one way they show their appreciation for the skilled care they have received over the years.

“For the most part, the volunteers are the first face a patients sees,’’ said Adrineh Poulatian, PAMF’s director of patient experience. “They set the tone and bring that positivity and passion and empathy – that is part of their DNA.’’

In addition to welcoming patients, volunteers serve on the Patient Advisory Council, which is made up of patient advisors who review information, communication materials and participate in improvement work for clinical programs to make sure a patient’s perspective is represented.

Students volunteer during the summer, usually helping at the Urgent Care Centers in Los Gatos and Mountain View.

Several volunteers bring dogs to visit with patients at the Cancer Center in Sunnyvale, arranged through a partnership with the Peninsula Humane Society.

“Our volunteers are a wonderful resource,” said David Quincy, M.D., Area CEO, Sutter Bay Medical Foundation, South Bay. “Our patients are always telling us they appreciate help from volunteers, and that they make a difference in a patient’s visit. The volunteers add even more to our patient-centered approach.”

Poulatian, Kelly Robutz and Anamarie Rodriguez, coordinators for the volunteer program, said they are impressed by how committed the volunteers are to making sure the patient has a good experience.

Some of the volunteers have retired from a career working for PAMF. And some of the students who have volunteered at PAMF have gone on to study medicine and pursue careers as physicians.

Last year, volunteers clocked 23,000 hours working at PAMF clinics.

Volunteers often go above and beyond their commitment. Holthaus volunteers two days a week starting at 8 a.m. But he often gets to the Sunnyvale Center earlier so he can help patients who are going to the lab that opens at 7 a.m.

And then there are “Madeleine Mornings” – the times when he brings madeleine cookies to the receptionists.

And there are more sobering times.  Holthaus recalled a woman who came out of a doctor’s office crying due to a difficult diagnosis for a family member.

“All you can do is give them a hug,” he said, adding that the woman calmed down.

“It can be hard, but I love it,’’ he said of his experiences as a volunteer.

For more information about volunteering at Sutter Health, please visit Volunteering at Sutter Health.

 

 

 

 

 

Research at Sutter Health Shows New Treatment Approach Improves Survival, Reduces Metastasis in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

Posted on Mar 20, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Medical Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO – Prostate cancer impacts one in every nine men in the U.S. Although death rates from the disease have declined over the last two decades, over 25,000 men die from prostate cancer annually.

Docetaxel, a chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat other types of cancer, has improved overall survival with limited toxicity in men whose prostate cancers have metastasized and who are no longer sensitive to androgen suppression therapy (i.e., patients are hormone resistant).

Researchers at Sutter Health and other leading centers across the U.S. and Canada hypothesized that adding docetaxel to standard therapy could potentially improve overall survival and other clinical outcomes in men with localized, high-risk prostate cancer.

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Sutter Health a Leading Site Enrolling Patients to the PARTNER 3 Trial for Treatment of Aortic Value Stenosis

Posted on Feb 28, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Cardiac, Eden Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Novato Community Hospital, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Gould Medical Foundation, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Medical Foundation, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO – Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a minimally invasive procedure done without open-heart surgery to replace a narrowed aortic valve. The procedure is one of several research breakthroughs and interventional cardiology advances being pioneered at Sutter Health through the research of David Daniels, MD, an interventional cardiologist at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center and California Pacific Medical Center who directs Sutter’s Structural Heart Program, and collaborators across Sutter.

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