Affiliates

When Only the Best Will Do: Two Sutter Hospitals Earn Highest Quality Honor for Heart Bypass Surgery

Posted on Sep 5, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center and Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento are two of only four in state to earn three-star rating

 

OAKLAND, Calif. –Two members of the not-for-profit Sutter Health network, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland and Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento (SMCS) have earned the distinguished three-star rating from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) for patient care and outcomes in isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures—the most commonly performed open-heart surgery. The three-star rating, which denotes the highest category of quality, places Alta Bates Summit and SMCS among the elite programs for heart bypass surgery in the United States and Canada. Only four hospitals in California achieved a three star rating in CABG for 2018.

Junaid Khan, MD

Junaid Khan, MD, director of Cardiovascular Services for Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

This is the second time in three years Alta Bates Summit has achieved the three star rating.

“The three star rating is a testament to the expertise of our surgeons and the commitment of our physicians and staff to provide the highest quality and excellence to our patients,” says Junaid Khan, MD, director of Cardiovascular Services for Alta Bates Summit Medical Center.

The STS star rating system is one of the most sophisticated and highly regarded overall measures of quality in health care, rating the benchmarked outcomes of cardiothoracic surgery programs across the United States and Canada. The star rating is calculated using a combination of quality measures for specific procedures performed by an STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database participant.

Historically, about 6–10 percent of participants receive the three-star rating for isolated CABG surgery. The latest analysis of data for CABG surgery covers a 1-year period, from January 2018 to December 2018.

“Participation in the Database and public reporting demonstrates a commitment to quality improvement in health care delivery and helps provide patients and their families with meaningful information to help them make informed decisions about health care,” said David M. Shahian, MD, chair of the STS Task Force on Quality Measurement.

CABG is a surgical procedure in which one or more blocked coronary arteries are bypassed by a blood vessel graft to restore normal blood flow to the heart in people with coronary artery disease (narrowing of the coronary arteries due to fatty deposits) or angina (pain or discomfort in the chest due to narrowed arteries.) CABG reduces chest pain and risk of death from heart attack. Isolated CABG means that only a CABG surgery is performed on the patient without any other procedure.

Research at Sutter Health Brings New Hope to People with Cardiovascular Diseases

Posted on Sep 3, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Innovation, People, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Foundation, Sutter North Medical Group, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO – New discoveries in cardiovascular diseases can arise in a heartbeat, and few researchers across Sutter Health know this better than David Roberts, MD, FACC, FSCAI, Medical Director of Cardiovascular Services (Valley Region) at Sutter Health. Dr. Roberts’ 25-year career at Sutter parallels the leading-edge advances in cardiovascular diseases care and research aimed at treating patients with illnesses such as hypertension (high blood pressure), heart valve diseases, heart failure, myocardial infarction (heart attack), and coronary artery disease.

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Keeping pace with cardiovascular diseases research

Posted on Sep 3, 2019 in Affiliates, California Pacific Medical Center, Cardiac, Expanding Access, Innovation, Research, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO – For many people, a quickened heart beat is a normal physiologic response to physical activity or stress. But for at least 2.7 million Americans with atrial fibrillation, an abnormal or irregular heartbeat can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure, and other heart-related complications if left untreated. Learn how research at Sutter is helping guide and inform care for patients with this cardiovascular disease.

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Girl Scout Fieldtrip Inspires Life Devoted to Caring for Seniors

Posted on Aug 30, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Transformation, Uncategorized

Dr. Wendy Zachary with 100 year old ACE patient Dorothy Bobbet

SAN FRANCISCO –Years ago, a Girl Scout Brownie troop visited patients in a nursing home in South Carolina. One of those little girls was especially impressed by the setting and enjoyed trying to engage with the patients, many whom likely suffered from dementia. Fast-forward to the present. The little girl who spent an afternoon visiting nursing home patients has dedicated her career to ensuring the special needs of older patients are carefully considered.

Wendy Zachary, M.D., is now a geriatrician and medical director of the Acute Care for the Elderly (ACE) unit at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center, Mission Bernal Campus hospital in San Francisco. The need for specialized care for older patients is urgent and growing larger, according to Dr. Zachary. “One of our greatest needs in medicine today is having enough physicians and nurses to care for our aging population,” she says.

Figures from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services illustrate the size of the problem. In 2016, 49.2 million Americans (1 in 7) were 65 years and older. By 2020, there will be 56.4 million Americans over 65, with the fastest growing population being those aged 85 years and older.

Specialized Care for Older Patients Begins in the ER

The ACE unit at Mission Bernal, one of only six such units in California, was designed with the specific needs of older patients in mind. However, special care to address older patients’ needs actually begins at the point where the majority of ACE unit patients enter CPMC’s Mission Bernal Campus hospital—the emergency department.

The team behind the Geriatric Accreditation. Sara Cohen, MS, RN, AGCNS-BC; Wendy Zachary, M.D., Geriatrician; Ritik Chandra, M.D., Emergency Medicine

Mission Bernal’s emergency department is the first in San Francisco to be geriatric accredited by the American College of Emergency Physicians. This accreditation is awarded to emergency departments that are set up to specifically care for older patients who may have cognitive deficits. Mission Bernal’s emergency department staff are trained to ensure that older patients are directed to the appropriate setting for their specific needs, whether they would benefit most from services provided in an outpatient setting or whether they would be best cared-for in the ACE unit.

Programs Enhance Patient Experience, Reduce Cost of Care

“You wouldn’t want your 8-year-old child to stay on a general medicine floor, you would want them to stay on a pediatrics floor,” said Dr. Zachary. “The same idea applies to older patients who have more chronic medical conditions, sensory deficits, cognitive impairment and may have need for special considerations in regards to medications. This individually-tailored care is what our physicians, staff and Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) volunteers provide to our ACE unit patients.”

At CPMC’s Mission Bernal hospital, ACE unit patients receive tailored support through the HELP program, a comprehensive patient-centered program aimed at decreasing delirium in older hospitalized adults, thereby preserving mental and physical function. Decreasing delirium is important because it carries the same risk of mortality as a heart attack. Mission Bernal’s ACE unit is the only one in California to fully address all six key risk factors for delirium:  hearing impairment, visual impairment, cognitive impairment, functional impairment, having difficulty sleeping and kidney failure due to dehydration.

The cornerstone of the HELP program is deprescribing, which is the planned and supervised process of dose reduction or stopping of medication that might be causing harm, or no longer be of benefit. This starts with normalizing sleep/wake cycles to reduce the risk of delirium in patients. To address sleep/wake cycles, the ACE unit enlists specially trained volunteers to help staff gain insights to motivations that will help mobilize a patient to keep them awake and engaged during the day so that they sleep better at night.  With a better night’s sleep physicians can reduce or eliminate sleep aids and other medications, a step that is shown to lead to fewer complications, fewer falls and a reduced length of stay.

Combined, CPMC Mission Bernal’s HELP program and ACE unit have achieved notable success in the year since the hospital opened in August 2018. So far, length of stay for ACE patients our length of stay is 1.3 days less and our readmission rate is 3% less than standard of care for the older population on non ACE units. With lower length of stay and readmissions, CPMC is safely cutting the cost of care for these fragile patients by over $1 million per year.

By the Numbers

  • The average age of a patient in the ACE unit is 86.
  • Patients age 70 and older can be admitted to the unit for care.
  • The oldest patient to be at the ACE unit was 112 and on the day of discharge this patient walked out of the hospital on their own.
  • More than five percent of patient who are cared for at the ACE unit are 95 year of age or older.

What a Difference a Year Makes

Posted on Aug 29, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Pediatric Care, People, Scroll Images

Baby and Mission Bernal Hospital Share a Birthday

SAN FRANCISCO –One year ago this week, newborn baby Francis Peterson and his mother, were the first patients admitted to the new hospital at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), Mission Bernal Campus. Mission Bernal camput hospital opened for service at 7:00 a.m. on August 25, 2018, and shortly thereafter Francis and his mother were wheeled over on a gurney from the old hospital where he was born, to be the first patients through the door.

Now Francis is one year old! For a child, celebrating a first birthday is a major milestone with parties and gifts—whereas a hospital’s first year milestone is acknowledged and quickly moved past in the name of focusing on continuing to provide high quality healthcare.

Opening Mission Bernal hospital’s doors was the beginning of a new chapter in medical care for San Francisco’s southern neighborhoods. With a beautiful new building, and a new name that reflects the neighborhoods in which it’s located. Mission Bernal hospital offers new and expanded services to the community including larger departments for emergency services–with a geriatric accreditation, as well as a larger labor and delivery unit, orthopedic surgeries and the Acute Care for the Elderly (ACE) unit dedicated to the care of patients over the age of 70.

In one year, with 800 babies delivered and over 3,200 surgeries performed, CPMC’s Mission Bernal Campus hospital has become the community hospital of choice in the southern section of San Francisco.

Happy birthday Francis and happy anniversary to Mission Bernal and its dedicated staff and physicians!

 

 

 

Don’t Let a Fall Trip You Up

Posted on Aug 20, 2019 in Eden Medical Center, Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Wellness

September is Fall Prevention Month

 

CASTRO VALLEY, Calif. — According to the National Council on Aging, falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among older adults in the U.S. Locally, more than 1,300 people were treated in 2018 for injuries sustained in falls by the trauma department at Eden Medical Center, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network of care. And that total does not include less severe fall injuries treated in Eden’s emergency department or at other local hospitals, nor does it include people who fell without injury and did not seek care from a medical provider. Falls are clearly a big problem. How can you or someone you care about avoid injury from a fall?

How to Prevent Falls
Go for a checkup. While falls can happen at any age, 41 percent of the fall injuries treated last year in Eden’s trauma department were suffered by people over 55  years old. As people age, they may experience changes in vision, hearing and blood pressure that can put them at risk for a fall. But contrary to popular belief, falling is not a normal part of aging and should not be accepted as inevitable. All adults, but especially older adults, should have regular checkups with a care providers to monitor changes in their health and review medications.

Make a few minor changes to your daily routine, health and home. Add a little bit of exercise every day to increase muscular strength, flexibility and balance—all proven ways to prevent falls. Reduce the amount of alcohol you drink and eat a healthier diet to improve your health and help prevent falls. Install a grab bar in the bathroom and a nightlight in a dark hallway. If you use a ladder or step-ladder, be sure to follow all the safety precautions and have someone readily available to assist you.

Take a Free Class Designed to Help Reduce Falls
Educating people about falls and fall prevention and helping them make healthy choices to improve their quality of life is the focus of Fall Prevention Month at Eden. The medical center is sponsoring two programs beginning in September, “Tai Chi for Arthritis and Fall Prevention” and “Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns about Falls.” Both programs are offered to the community free of charge and are designed specifically to reduce falls by improving confidence, strength, flexibility and balance.

  • “Tai Chi for Arthritis and Fall Prevention” begins Monday, Sept. 16 from 8 a.m.-9 a.m., meeting every Monday and Wednesday through Nov. 20. Tai Chi is an ancient practice originating in China using graceful, slow movements that are low impact and suitable for those who are older or might not otherwise exercise.  The movements learned in this 10-week class increase balance and strength and have been shown to reduce the risk of a fall by up to 70 percent.
  • “Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns about Falls” begins Friday, Sept. 27 from 10 a.m.-noon, continuing each week through Nov. 15. This eight-week workshop combines discussion and exercise to reduce fear of falling and provide practical solutions to preventing falls.

These classes approach fall prevention in different ways but have the same goal of reducing falls. Classes are free, commitment to the full series is required and space is limited. For more information, discuss which class might be right for you, or to register, call Eden Medical Center Trauma Injury Prevention at 510-727-8485.