Affiliates

Cuddly Toys Ease Hospitalized Kids’ Stress

Posted on Jun 13, 2019 in Scroll Images, Sutter Delta Medical Center

Sutter Delta Auxiliary Provides Comfort for Kids

ANTIOCH, CALIF. –Imagine being a kid at the hospital—waiting for an X-ray or to go into surgery. A visit to the hospital can be nerve-racking, even for adults. For kids, it can be daunting.

“Kids waiting for X-rays and procedures were very nervous and needed something to do with their hands,” says Joy Burge, a member of the Sutter Delta Medical Center Auxiliary.

Sutter Delta Medical Center Auxiliary Volunteers Allen Hansen, DD Rivera and Joy Burge show off the great toys for children waiting for surgery or a procedure at the hospital.

That’s when a brilliant idea struck, and recently the Auxiliary has partnered with the Women’s & Children’s Services department to provide age-appropriate toys for Sutter Delta’s youngest patients.

“We…ordered 24 teddy bears that are five to six inches long, dressed in hoodies that talk and laugh,” Burge says.

The Auxiliary also is ordering “squishy” toys—soft, “squishable” toys similar to the classic stress ball. Made of polyurethane foam, the toys allow kids—and adults—to squeeze away their stress over and over again, and the toy will still return to its original form.

“Every time people buy something at the Sutter Delta gift shop, buy tickets at one of our [Auxiliary] raffles, or get a treat at a bake sale, it goes straight back to the hospital departments,” Burge says. “Every little bit helps.”

For more information about Sutter Delta Medical Center’s Auxiliary, click here.

Best Employers in Sacramento? Forbes Ranks Sutter No. 1

Posted on Jun 12, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Expanding Access, People, Quality, Scroll Images, We're Awesome

Sutter Health, with hospitals, medical offices and other care facilities throughout Northern California, is the top-ranked Sacramento-based organization on the Forbes list of top employers.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Employees love working for Sutter Health, according to a new list by Forbes. In its first-ever ranking of America’s best employers by state, Sutter Health was listed as Sacramento’s top locally based employer. The Sacramento Bee was first to report the news, and their story is available here.

Using anonymous surveys, Forbes and market research company Statista pinpointed the organizations liked best by employees, according to the Forbes website.

Sutter Health, a not-for-profit healthcare organization in Northern California with 55,000 employees, ranked 26th on California’s list, but took the top spot for employers headquartered in the Sacramento region. Several of the companies listed – including Costco, which is ranked No. 1 in California – are not based in the state. Excluding those employers headquartered out of state, Sutter ranks in the top 20 at No. 17, and is in the top 10 for employers based in Northern California, with such tech giants as H-P, Cisco and Apple.

The Forbes’ list isn’t the only one to rank Sutter organizations as being top-notch employers. During the past 10 years, Modern Healthcare has named several Sutter hospitals and even the entire Sutter Health Valley Area as being Best Places to Work in Healthcare. This year, two hospitals were honored: Sutter Roseville Medical Center and Sutter Amador Hospital.

Sutter Health is more than 60,000 people strong, thanks to our integrated network of clinicians, employees and volunteers. Grounded in our not-for-profit mission, our team members partner to provide access to high quality, affordable care for more than 3 million Northern Californians through our network of hospitals, medical foundations, urgent and walk-in care centers, home health and hospice services.

The full Forbes listing can be accessed here.

New digital health tool aims to help patients keep better tabs on diabetes

Posted on Jun 5, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO (Calif.) Type 2 diabetes is not curable, but it is controllable—but as any patient or doctor will tell you, managing diabetes comes with its own set of challenges.

Given the disease’s complexity, patients and doctors need to maximize their time together. To help improve the care of people with cardiometabolic conditions such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol, investigators in Sutter’s Center for Health Systems Research (CHSR) and collaborators at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals developed and piloted an online tool called CM-SHARE (cardiometabolic Sutter Health Advanced Reengineered Encounter) to help primary care providers better manage patients with diabetes and other cardiometabolic conditions during their office visits.

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Shining Light on Multiple Sclerosis

Posted on May 30, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – Sutter researchers launch new digital health tool to improve care for people with multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS)—a potentially disabling immunologic disease of the central nervous system— affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide, including almost 1 million Americans. Despite new research and over a dozen treatments for MS, the specific cause remains unknown and the disease has no cure.

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A New Lens to Study the Origin of Multiple Sclerosis

Posted on May 30, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – A new research collaboration will allow Sutter to collect and analyze ‘big data’ in hopes of identifying new disease markers for Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

MS is a difficult disease to treat because its cause is unknown. 

“MS is challenging to manage because there are no biomarkers or blood tests to diagnose or understand the individual patient’s prognosis and his or her likely response to medications,” says Joanna Cooper, M.D., a Sutter neurologist and MS clinician-investigator. “We know that disease course and presentation of symptoms vary by gender, age, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity. But we don’t know which treatment would be optimal for which patients, and why.” Read More

Teaching South Placer Schoolchildren How to ‘Stop the Bleed’

Posted on May 29, 2019 in Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Rocklin Elementary students learn how to “stop the bleed,” an easy skill to learn that could save someone’s life.

SOUTH PLACER COUNTY, Calif. – On Jan. 15, 2019, a gunman went on a shooting spree in Placer County. Multiple rounds were fired and many targets were hit. Two people were struck, one was a tragic fatality and one survived. One of the keys that saved his life was his 8-year-old daughter, who held direct pressure on the bleeding wound.

Per the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), traumatic injuries can affect anyone regardless of their age, race or economic status. In the first half of life, more Americans die from injuries and violence, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls or homicides, than from any other cause of death, including cancer, HIV or the flu. This makes injury the leading cause of death among persons from the ages of 1-44.

In many cases of traumatic injuries, bleeding is a preventable cause of death. The ability to recognize life-threatening bleeding and the ability to intervene effectively can save a person’s life. Whether a bleeding traumatic injury is the result of a home accident or shooting, one person – who is on the scene, at the right time and who has the right training – can save a life.

Sutter Roseville Emergency Department Medical Director Jon Perlstein, M.D., teaches a student how to stop the bleed.

To help save lives, the national Stop the Bleed program was developed by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) in 2015. The goal of the program is to turn the average person into “immediate responders,” the first person at the scene of an injury. This person is rarely a trained medical care provider professional emergency responder. No matter how fast the arrival of emergency services, bystanders will always be first on the scene. A person who is bleeding can die from severe blood loss within minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the bleeding. Those nearest to someone with life-threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.

Team members from Sutter Roseville Medical Center Trauma Services, Emergency Preparedness, Critical Care and the Emergency Department along with American Medical Response, Roseville Fire Department, Auburn Fire Department and Rocklin Fire Department have provided Stop the Bleed training to more than 3,000 students in South Placer County and surrounding areas. These courses can be taught to school-aged children from kindergarten to high school and adult learners. Sutter Roseville has also donated more than 80 Stop the Bleed kits to schools in the Rocklin, Newcastle and Roseville school districts.

Additionally, all staff members at the medical center also receive the training.

“Unexpected injuries, whether accidental or intentional, can occur at their place of work, schools or other public areas,” says Erik Angle, Sutter Roseville Emergency Preparedness Coordinator and registered nurse. “Bystanders are the initial help until help arrives. Being trained, prepared and ready can save lives.”

Kate Carleton, Sutter Roseville Trauma Quality Clinical Education Coordinator, states, “The number one cause of early death from trauma is uncontrolled hemorrhage.  Early direct control of bleeding has been clearly shown to save lives.”

This training can and has saved lives across the country and almost anyone of age can easily learn these lifesaving skills. For more information on the Stop the Bleed Program and possible training, please contact Kate Carleton at carletk@sutterhealth.org.

May 2019 is the first ever National Stop the Bleed Month. This nationwide campaign highlights the importance of Stop the Bleed training and provides the public with information and education through local fire, EMS, and health-care professionals.