Mills-Peninsula Health Services

Leading Neurologist Gives Insight on Stroke Care Innovation

Posted on May 2, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO – Every second counts in detecting and treating stroke, the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the U.S. Each year, approximately 795,000 people suffer a stroke. New research at Sutter Health is helping bring faster, life-changing care to stroke patients through a clinical trial called BEST-MSU that will test the efficacy of Sutter’s Mobile Stroke Unit (MSU).

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Mills-Peninsula Physician Receives International Achievement Award from American Diabetes Association

Posted on May 1, 2019 in Mills-Peninsula Health Services, People, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

BURLINGAME, Calif. – Congratulations to David Klonoff, M.D., FACP, FRCP (Edin), Fellow AIMBE, medical director of the Diabetes Research Institute at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, on being the 2019 recipient of the Outstanding Physician Clinician in Diabetes Award from the American Diabetes Association. This is the highest international award for a diabetes clinician and Dr. Klonoff is the first diabetes physician from Northern California to ever receive this award.

“Being a physician at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center (MPMC) has allowed me to meet many amazing physicians, nurses and educators here, and to work on projects that can benefit patients from San Mateo County, the United States and the entire world,” Dr. Klonoff said. “Development of cutting-edge treatments for diabetes, such as the artificial pancreas, new insulins, software for dosing diabetes medications, cybersecurity standards for wearable diabetes devices and new methods for measuring glucose and Hemoglobin A1c, are what we do at MPMC.  I am very happy to be part of the great MPMC staff and to be recognized for my work as a diabetes clinician at MPMC.”

Dr. Klonoff has been a member of the medical staff at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, part of Sutter Health, since 1981.

Dr. Klonoff, along with the seven additional recipients of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2019 National Scientific and Health Care Achievement Awards, will be honored in a special ceremony during the ADA’s 79th Scientific Sessions. More than 11,000 leading physicians, scientists and healthcare professionals from around the world are expected to convene at the Scientific Sessions, making it the world’s largest scientific meeting focused on diabetes research, prevention and care.

“This year’s National Scientific and Health Care Achievement Award recipients are distinguished global leaders in research, clinical care and academic medicine. Collectively, their incredible contributions and research discoveries have informed on important management strategies that helped us decrease the incidence of many serious complications of diabetes, address co-morbidities and improve quality of life for the millions of people living with diabetes,” said William T. Cefalu, M.D., Chief Scientific, Medical and Mission Officer of the ADA.

An endocrinologist specializing in the development and use of diabetes technology, Dr. Klonoff is the author of more than 300 publications and has been a principal investigator on more than 110 clinical trials, including the first randomized controlled multicenter trial of an outpatient artificial pancreas product. He chaired the scientific advisory board for developing the first FDA-approved insulin patch pump and participated in development of the first FDA-approved dedicated diabetes telemedicine system, the first FDA-approved inhaled insulin, and the first three FDA-approved incretin drugs for diabetes.

Dr. Klonoff has served as a civilian medical officer for the U.S. Army’s Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) for biosensors and physiologic monitoring, and chaired the CDC’s initiative, “Sticking with Safety,” for safe blood glucose monitoring to avoid transmitting blood-borne viruses. He also led technical and clinical guideline panels about continuous glucose monitoring for CLSI and the Endocrine Society.

In 2010, Dr. Klonoff received the FDA Director’s Special Citation Award, and in 2012, he was elected as a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. That same year, he also received the 2012 Gold Medal Oration and Distinguished Scientist Award from the Dr. Mohan’s Diabetes Specialties Centre and Madras Diabetes Research Foundation of Chennai, India, which is the world’s largest diabetes clinic. In 2000 Dr. Klonoff founded Mills-Peninsula’s Dorothy L. and James E. Frank Diabetes Research Institute to facilitate development of new devices and drugs for people with diabetes.

Dr. Klonoff is the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, and founder of the Diabetes Technology Meeting, the Digital Diabetes Congress, and the Hospital Diabetes Meeting. As diabetes technology has become ever more connected, Dr. Klonoff has also become involved in advancing security standards for internet-connected medical devices. He is a member of the Healthcare Sector Coordinating Council Joint Cyber Working Group for Medical Devices/Healthcare, and chaired the groups developing the world’s first consensus medical device cybersecurity standards. He is also a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Klonoff is a graduate of UC Berkeley, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in his junior year, and UCSF Medical School, where he was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha in his junior year. His postgraduate training included two years at UCLA Hospital and three years at UCSF Hospitals.

 

Real-Time Research: Using Insights to Help Healthcare Today and Tomorrow

Posted on Apr 20, 2019 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Research, Scroll Images, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO – New research shows that weight loss during the first 12 weeks of a year-long behavioral lifestyle program can predict which participants will achieve weight loss after completing the program. This revelation, along with several others, were shared by Sutter Health’s Center for Health Systems Research (CHSR) during the recent annual meeting of the Health Care Systems Research Network (HCSRN) in Portland.

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Change of Heart: Sutter Health is Poised for New Era in Cardiology Care

Posted on Mar 29, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Carousel, Mills-Peninsula Health Services

BURLINGAME, Calif. — Change can be sudden or slow, in this case it’s both. Sutter Health has been at the forefront of a decade-long journey to offer more patients with aortic valve stenosis an alternative to open-heart surgery. With new research presented last week at one of the world’s top cardiology meetings that goal seems achievable almost overnight.

Aortic stenosis is a serious cardiac condition in which the aortic valve in the heart narrows, limiting blood flow to the body. Doctors can treat aortic stenosis by replacing the patient’s faulty valve either during open-heart surgery or through a minimally invasive procedure called TAVR (Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement).

David Daniels, M.D.

It is estimated that 100,000 TAVR procedures have been performed over the past decade, yet open-heart surgery remained the standard of care. “This meant that I could only offer TAVR if open-heart surgery would put my patient at an unnecessarily high risk for complications,” said interventional cardiologist David Daniels, M.D., co-director of Sutter’s Structural Heart Program in the Bay Area and a Sutter Health clinician-investigator.

Recently a major clinical trial[1] showed that a reversal may be in order; going forward TAVR may be the routine treatment or ‘gold standard’ for aortic stenosis, and open-heart surgery may be the exception.

Sutter Health not only participated in the recently completed trial, but under a continued access protocol, three Sutter Health hospitals are able to continue offering TAVR to a broader group of patients—even while the U.S. Food and Drug Administration examines the trial’s data.

The three Bay Area hospitals participating in the continued access protocol are: Mills-Peninsula Medical Center (Burlingame), California Pacific Medical Center (San Francisco), and Alta Bates Summit Medical Center (Oakland).

“I want to stress that TAVR is not a new procedure. I’ve successfully treated over 950 patients with this technique,” remarked Dr. Daniels. “The new part of this is that we can now offer TAVR, which is done through a small incision in the groin, to even more patients than before—giving them an option that is often safer, and often has a faster recovery time, than open-heart surgery.”

A typical hospital stay for open-heart surgery is a week to 10 days. TAVR patients often go home within 24 hours and are back to their usual activities within a few days instead of six weeks or longer for open-heart surgery patients.

Remarkable Clinical Trial Results 

Sutter Health’s cardiovascular teams have been involved with TAVR since its inception and have continued to pioneer the procedure as the artificial valves themselves have evolved. Over the years, several Sutter Health hospitals have participated in studies that confirmed the safety and efficacy of TAVR in patients who have intermediate or high risk of complication from open-heart surgery.

However, the most recent trial, called the PARTNER 3 trial, specifically looked at patients for whom open-heart surgery carries a relatively low risk of complications.[2]

Sutter Health affiliated combined sites Mills-Peninsula Medical Center (MPMC) and Alta Bates Summit Medical Center (ABSMC) were major contributors to the PARTNER 3 trial and the second largest enrollment site in the state (trailing Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles). The Bay Area hospitals achieved a zero percent complication rate (one year post procedure) among low risk patients who received TAVR as part of the trial. Sutter Medical Center Sacramento also participated in the PARTNER 3 trial.

“The PARTNER 3 results are remarkable. There was a statistically significant 60 percent reduction in risk of death and stroke in TAVR compared to surgery, and this was carried out to one year,” Dr. Daniels remarked.

The study looked at rehospitalization associated with death, stroke or heart failure, and found that these negative results were 50 percent lower (half as likely) when the patient had TAVR instead of open-heart surgery. Beyond these results, there were significantly lower rates of renal failure, life threatening hemorrhage and reduced length of hospital stay among the patients in the TAVR group compared to the open-heart surgery patients.

The Future is Here

“Presently we are in the gap between the end of the PARTNER 3 trial and a decision by the FDA that might officially extend approval of TAVR to the low risk patient group,” explained Dr. Daniels. Today, the artificial valves used in the TAVR procedure are FDA-approved only for patients who are considered too old or frail to have open-heart surgery.

“We are proud to continue to offer the TAVR procedure to low risk patients as part of our participation in the valve manufacturer’s continued access protocol.” Three Sutter Health hospitals: Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center and Alta Bates Summit Medical Center — are the only facilities in Northern California currently participating in the continued access protocol.

“Common sense told us that even patients with a low risk of complications from open-heart surgery may benefit significantly from treatment with TAVR instead,” Dr. Daniels said. “Results from the PARTNER 3 trial indicate that, for many patients, this has proven to be true. We are pleased to be able to offer TAVR to all patient risk groups.”

These groundbreaking clinical results are an example of how Sutter Health is leading the transformation of healthcare. If you are suffering from severe aortic valve stenosis talk to your cardiologist to see if valve replacement with TAVR is right for you.

[1] Mack MJ, Leon MB, Thourani VH, et al. Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement with a balloon-expandable valve in low-risk patients. N Engl J Med. 2019 Mar 17. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1814052. [Epub ahead of print]

[2] The PARTNER 3 trial was sponsored by the makers of the Sapien artificial valve, Edwards Lifesciences of Irvine, Calif. Dr. Daniels is a consultant for Edwards Lifesciences.

Your Gifts Help Us Bring the Emergency Department to the Patient

Posted on Mar 20, 2019 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Quality, Research, Scroll Images

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S. and the leading cause of adult disability, affecting 800,000 people a year. Time is critical for people who experience a stroke—every minute saves 2 million brain cells.

 

Every minute counts when treating a patient who has had a stroke. Donor support for the Mobile Stroke Unit gives us the tools to help ensure that patients in our community not only survive, but also avoid the debilitating effects of a stroke. Through a research trial this project will also help to inform best practices in stroke treatment nationwide —impacting the care of thousands.

The Mills-Peninsula Hospital Foundation has launched a $2.4 million fundraising campaign to underwrite the cost of operating the Unit for the first 2 years, while a randomized controlled trial is conducted to gauge the effectiveness of the program compared to conventional care.

Invest in the Mobile Stroke Unit.

Preliminary studies have indicated that a Mobile Stroke Unit can reduce the time from ambulance dispatch to treatment to as little as 11 minutes. Sutter Health affiliated Mills-Peninsula Medical Center is the only hospital in Northern California and one of only two hospitals in the state to have a Mobile Stroke Unit.

Research at Sutter Health Shows New Treatment Approach Improves Survival, Reduces Metastasis in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

Posted on Mar 20, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Medical Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO – Prostate cancer impacts one in every nine men in the U.S. Although death rates from the disease have declined over the last two decades, over 25,000 men die from prostate cancer annually.

Docetaxel, a chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat other types of cancer, has improved overall survival with limited toxicity in men whose prostate cancers have metastasized and who are no longer sensitive to androgen suppression therapy (i.e., patients are hormone resistant).

Researchers at Sutter Health and other leading centers across the U.S. and Canada hypothesized that adding docetaxel to standard therapy could potentially improve overall survival and other clinical outcomes in men with localized, high-risk prostate cancer.

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