Eden Medical Center

Sutter’s Eden Medical Center Welcomes New CEO

Posted on Oct 25, 2019 in Eden Medical Center, People, Scroll Images

CASTRO VALLEY, Calif.Patricia Ryan recently began her new role as chief executive officer of Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley.

Eden Medical Center CEO Patricia Ryan

Ryan comes to Eden, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit integrated network of care, from O’Connor Hospital in San Jose, California where she was chief operating officer. At O’Connor, she also served as interim CEO for one year, and most recently was the hospital executive. Ryan has extensive leadership experience in acute care hospital operations, physician partnerships, joint venture management and the continuum of care, including skilled nursing, home health, acute rehab and behavioral health.

“I’m so pleased to have a leader as capable and enthusiastic as Pat to lead Eden Medical Center. Her outstanding healthcare leadership experience will ensure we evolve along with our community,” said Julie Petrini, president and CEO of Sutter Bay Hospitals.

Prior to O’Connor Hospital, Ryan held vice president positions for Sutter’s Mills‐Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame, California. At Mills-Peninsula, she provided strategic and operational leadership as Vice President of service lines and as Vice President of ambulatory services.

Previously, Ryan held leadership positions for Princeton Healthcare System in New Jersey, Main Line Health System in Pennsylvania, Manor Healthcare Corporation in Maryland and Continental Medical System in Pennsylvania.

Ryan earned her bachelor’s degree in social work from Juniata College in Pennsylvania and a master’s degree in health administration from the Pennsylvania State University.

Outgoing CEO Stephen Gray will transition to his new role as chief Administrator of Sutter Maternity & Surgery Center and Palo Alto Medical Foundation in Santa Cruz.

Stupski Foundation to Enhance Palliative Care for Alameda County Patients with $3.5 Million Grant to Sutter Health

Posted on Sep 30, 2019 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Eden Medical Center, Expanding Access, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Scroll Images

(OAKLAND, Calif) –The Stupski Foundation has awarded not-for-profit Sutter Health a $3.5 million, three-year grant to build a comprehensive Palliative and Advanced Illness Care (PAIC) program for northern Alameda County.

This significant grant will enable Sutter to build on successful palliative care programs already in place at the healthcare network’s Alameda County hospitals, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland and Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, while incorporating elements of both the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s (PAMF) innovative ambulatory palliative care and support services program and Sutter’s impactful home-based Advanced Illness Management Program.

The grant will help caregivers at these Sutter organizations integrate palliative and advanced illness care services across care settings, to provide more continuous and comprehensive support for patients and families facing serious illness. This collaborative model extends services to thousands of additional people in the county who suffer from the complex challenges of serious illnesses such as cancer, dementia or advanced heart, lung or kidney disease, by providing more timely, seamless and flexible services to address their physical, social, emotional and spiritual needs. Multidisciplinary palliative care teams at Sutter include specially trained doctors, nurse practitioners, nurses, social workers, chaplains and other specialists.

“We are honored to partner with the Stupski Foundation to improve patient and family experience by enhancing serious illness care across Alameda County,” says Elizabeth Mahler, M.D., Sutter Health Vice President Clinical Integration, Office of Patient Experience. “This generous grant will help us serve thousands more patients and families with collaborative care that seeks to decrease suffering by putting the personal preferences, needs and values of patients and families front and center.”

“Sutter Health has been recognized as a national leader in serious illness care since the creation of its Advanced Illness Management (AIM) program,” Dan Tuttle, director of health at the Stupski Foundation says. “This grant supports their efforts to roll out an even more comprehensive palliative care model for people with serious illness, bringing home-based care to hundreds of patients and new inpatient and outpatient services to thousands more throughout Alameda County every year. We hope that healthcare continues to move from inside clinic walls to meet people where they need it and we see quality home-based palliative care as a critical part of that shift.”

Reaching More Patients in Need

Sutter Health Palliative and Advanced Illness Management programs serving Alameda County are running close to maximum capacity, currently serve about 3,000 patients annually. Sutter palliative care program leaders estimate that an additional 2,000 patients will benefit from improved PAIC coordination, capacity and services made possible by the Stupski Foundation grant.

This new comprehensive model of care in Alameda County will encompass four key components of serious illness care including specialty palliative care, advance care planning, family caregiver support and links to social services.

“This grant gives Sutter the opportunity to more broadly provide compassionate care to the communities we serve. It will allow us to create a path of care, comfort and support for those patients and families who are facing an advanced illness in a way that we have previously not been able to provide,” says Jeffrey Stoneberg, DO, Palliative Care Medical Director at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center.

Sutter will launch the ambulatory based PAIC program at Alta Bates Summit next year, followed by Eden starting in 2021.

Physical Therapy Takes a Giant Step Forward

Posted on Sep 25, 2019 in Community Benefit, Eden Medical Center, Expanding Access, Innovation, Scroll Images

(CASTRO VALLEY, Calif) –The community came together at the recent Castro Valley Fall Festival to support advanced health care at Sutter’s Eden Medical Center, raising more than $10,000 –which will be matched by an additional $10,000 from the Rotary Club of Castro Valley —toward the purchase of an Ekso GT Robotics Exoskeleton therapy device. The wearable robotic technology helps survivors of stroke, spinal cord injury and other forms of lower extremity weakness to walk again by providing comprehensive gait therapy beyond what a physical therapist can do with conventional tools.

 

“We are proud to support Eden Medical Center in their vision to bring this remarkable technology to our local community, and we can’t say enough about how proud we are in the community’s outpouring of support at the Fall Festival,” said Todd Anglin, president of the Castro Valley Rotary.

To complete the funding of the exoskeleton, Sutter Health will match more than $100,000 toward the $207,000 needed.

“We are so honored that the Rotary and so many community members came together at the Fall Festival to achieve this generous match,” said Stephen Gray, immediate past CEO of Eden. “Donor gifts will directly enhance the level of care we are able to bring to this community and we are grateful for this partnership with the Rotary.”

Eden Medical Center, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit integrated network of healthcare, treats more than 700 stroke patients each year and serves as a referral center for advanced neurological conditions. The Ekso GT Robotics Exoskeleton provides advanced rehabilitation technology to achieve optimal outcomes for stroke patients.

Stroke is the number one cause of disability in the nation and regaining mobility is one of the biggest challenges during stroke rehabilitation. Over 60% of acute stroke survivors are unable to walk or experience difficulty with walking. Physical therapy guided by trained specialists can help patients to regain the strength, balance, and endurance they need to walk following a stroke.

Rehab centers at Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center and Sutter Roseville Medical Center also have the exoskeleton therapy device.

To make a gift toward purchasing the exoskeleton for Eden Medical Center, click here.

Don’t Let a Fall Trip You Up

Posted on Aug 20, 2019 in Eden Medical Center, Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Wellness

September is Fall Prevention Month

 

CASTRO VALLEY, Calif. — According to the National Council on Aging, falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among older adults in the U.S. Locally, more than 1,300 people were treated in 2018 for injuries sustained in falls by the trauma department at Eden Medical Center, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network of care. And that total does not include less severe fall injuries treated in Eden’s emergency department or at other local hospitals, nor does it include people who fell without injury and did not seek care from a medical provider. Falls are clearly a big problem. How can you or someone you care about avoid injury from a fall?

How to Prevent Falls
Go for a checkup. While falls can happen at any age, 41 percent of the fall injuries treated last year in Eden’s trauma department were suffered by people over 55  years old. As people age, they may experience changes in vision, hearing and blood pressure that can put them at risk for a fall. But contrary to popular belief, falling is not a normal part of aging and should not be accepted as inevitable. All adults, but especially older adults, should have regular checkups with a care providers to monitor changes in their health and review medications.

Make a few minor changes to your daily routine, health and home. Add a little bit of exercise every day to increase muscular strength, flexibility and balance—all proven ways to prevent falls. Reduce the amount of alcohol you drink and eat a healthier diet to improve your health and help prevent falls. Install a grab bar in the bathroom and a nightlight in a dark hallway. If you use a ladder or step-ladder, be sure to follow all the safety precautions and have someone readily available to assist you.

Take a Free Class Designed to Help Reduce Falls
Educating people about falls and fall prevention and helping them make healthy choices to improve their quality of life is the focus of Fall Prevention Month at Eden. The medical center is sponsoring two programs beginning in September, “Tai Chi for Arthritis and Fall Prevention” and “Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns about Falls.” Both programs are offered to the community free of charge and are designed specifically to reduce falls by improving confidence, strength, flexibility and balance.

  • “Tai Chi for Arthritis and Fall Prevention” begins Monday, Sept. 16 from 8 a.m.-9 a.m., meeting every Monday and Wednesday through Nov. 20. Tai Chi is an ancient practice originating in China using graceful, slow movements that are low impact and suitable for those who are older or might not otherwise exercise.  The movements learned in this 10-week class increase balance and strength and have been shown to reduce the risk of a fall by up to 70 percent.
  • “Matter of Balance: Managing Concerns about Falls” begins Friday, Sept. 27 from 10 a.m.-noon, continuing each week through Nov. 15. This eight-week workshop combines discussion and exercise to reduce fear of falling and provide practical solutions to preventing falls.

These classes approach fall prevention in different ways but have the same goal of reducing falls. Classes are free, commitment to the full series is required and space is limited. For more information, discuss which class might be right for you, or to register, call Eden Medical Center Trauma Injury Prevention at 510-727-8485.

 

 

Accidental Medication Exposure at Home Takes a Toll on Kids

Posted on Apr 24, 2019 in Eden Medical Center, Innovation, Scroll Images

CASTRO VALLEY, Calif. –You’ve heard the warnings: put medicines out of reach of children, read all labels, take only what is prescribed in the manner it is prescribed. Yet every year, nearly 60,000 kids under the age of 5 are accidentally exposed to medications, according to Consumer Reports.

So, what can be done?

Proper Disposal

Proper disposal of unwanted, unused or expired medicines is a great way to safeguard against unintentional exposure. But throwing unwanted medicines into the garbage, down the toilet, or other non-sanctioned means of disposal is not safe and poses both health and environmental hazards.

The safest way to dispose of medicines is to put them in special medication disposal kiosks where they are stored until they can be destroyed. Working with the Alameda County Med-Project, Eden Medical Center, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network of care, now offers medication disposal kiosks to the community. The kiosks are conveniently located in the hospital’s lobby, open to the public, and free of charge for anyone to drop off unwanted or expired medications.

Trauma registrar, Susan Choing, demonstrates how to use the new medication take-back kiosk at Eden Medical Center.

Says Eden’s trauma injury prevention specialist, Pam Stoker, “These kiosks are a symbol of our commitment to the safety and care of our community. By providing a location for safe disposal of medications, we are providing a means for people to proactively safeguard against accidental misuse of medications.”

Another option for safe disposal is to bring medications to the Drug Enforcement Administration’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day event on Saturday, April 27 at the Castro Valley Library from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. DEA officers will be on hand to collect unwanted or expired medicines as well as illegal drugs for safe disposal—no questions asked.

Safe Storage

Safe storage of medicine is key in protecting against unintentional exposure. According to a new research report, Medicine Safety: A Key Part of Child-Proofing Your Home, a disconnect exists between where people “store” their medications and where they “keep” their medications. Medications that are not frequently used are “stored” in a safe location like a medicine cabinet or closet, whereas daily use prescriptions or over the counter medicines are “kept” in more convenient, easy to reach locations like the nightstand or counter top. This disconnect creates a risk for unintentional poisoning. To keep others safe, maintain all medications out of sight away from locations that are easily accessible—no matter how frequently you use them.

Working Together to Prevent Unintentional Exposure

In Alameda County, several agencies have come together to outreach to the community for medication safety education and awareness. Safe Kids Alameda County is a member of Safe Kids Worldwide, a global network of organizations dedicated to preventing unintentional injury. They work to prevent unintentional childhood injury, the number one cause of death for children in the United States. Its members include Alameda County Emergency Medical Services, Alameda Health Systems, Sutter’s Eden Medical Center, UCSF-Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland, and many other local agencies. Work is also being done by the Alameda County Meds Coalition, which meets monthly at Supervisor Nate Miley’s office in Castro Valley. The Coalition brings together various agencies to work on topics of medication safety including legislation and ease of safe disposal of medications, safe prescribing, and education/awareness on medication safety.

To learn more about medication safety visit the SafeKids website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bike ‘Rodeo’ Promotes Safety, Boosts Kids’ Confidence

Posted on Apr 11, 2019 in Eden Medical Center, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

CASTRO VALLEY, Calif. – Forty-five buckaroos from Stanton Elementary School in Castro Valley are riding a little taller—and more safely—in the saddle thanks to staff from Sutter’s Eden Medical Center who devoted a recent Saturday afternoon to teaching kids bike safety at a special Bike Rodeo.

“The highlight of the day was seeing the children who started out a little nervous and hesitant to ride gain the confidence to zip around like they’ve been riding forever—and knowing they had learned the skills to feel safe to ride,” said trauma injury prevention specialist Pam Stoker, who coordinated the event for Eden.

The Bike Rodeo began with experts from Bike East Bay teaching kids and parents how to check their bikes for functional safety, such as testing brakes and checking tire pressure. Then the children passed through several stations where they learned how to fit and wear their bicycle helmets appropriately, practiced riding drills that taught them how to ride their bikes safely in various ways (single file vs. side by side, turning, riding with one hand on their hip—all based on each child’s individual skill and comfort level) and learned hand signals and traffic rules, including how to handle intersections and crosswalks.

The Alameda County Transportation Commission’s BikeMobile provided no-cost repairs for the families who attended. In total, 36 bikes with problems varying from minor to more substantial received needed repairs. The Bike Rodeo is the start of a new partnership between Eden, Stanton Elementary PTA, BikeMobile and Bike East Bay collaborating to reduce bicycle-related injuries to kids.

Said parent Rebecca Stanek, “It was wonderful to see Stanton Elementary School students and other community members gain newfound skills and confidence on their bikes. And thanks to the BikeMobile, many families’ bicycles are in better shape than they were at this time last week. Many thanks to Eden Medical Center for hosting such a wonderful event for the school community!”