California Pacific Medical Center

Move-In Day is Near for San Francisco’s Newest Medical Office Building

Posted on May 8, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation, Women's Services

10-story facility integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care

SAN FRANCISCO –Sutter Health today announced the June 3 opening of Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation’s (SPMF) Van Ness and Geary medical office building (or MOB) at 1100 Van Ness Ave. The building, owned by Pacific Medical Buildings, is a 10-story, 250,000 sq. ft. facility located across the street from Sutter’s new CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital, which opened in March. More than 120 specialty physicians and clinicians from the Sutter Health network will occupy five floors of the building in the heart of San Francisco. The MOB completes the creation of a coordinated medical campus community that integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care.

The new Van Ness and Geary Medical Office Building (MOB) opens its doors on Monday, June 3. This 250,000 sq. ft. building completes a coordinated medical campus community that integrates outpatient services with nearby hospital care.

Physicians and clinicians affiliated with SPMF, the Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) and California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) will occupy five floors. Private physicians will lease space on floors 7-10. Among the practice areas: advanced organ therapy (including transplant services), women’s services, medical and surgical specialty clinics, neurosciences, and cardiovascular services. In addition to a 383-spot underground parking garage, a Walgreens pharmacy is located on the street level. Lab and imaging facilities will be available by July 15. A 125-foot-long, staff-only tunnel connects the MOB with the hospital, completing the new medical campus community.

“Sutter’s Van Ness and Geary medical office building is designed to enhance convenience and access to high-quality care, as well as create an exceptional experience for patients, their families and friends,” said Kelvin Lam, M.D., Interim CEO for SPMF San Francisco and Marin. “The opening of this modern and centrally-located facility adds another world-class, multi-specialty healthcare center to the Sutter portfolio. This medical office building incorporates a powerful healing environment with an integrated continuum of services to support the community for decades to come.”

A truly integrated healthcare network

Sutter’s integrated care model allows patients to access primary care in local neighborhoods and higher level specialty care at the new MOB and at other care centers throughout the Bay Area.  The CPMC Van Ness hospital serves as the hub for all consolidated inpatient facilities and outpatient services. With the completion of the MOB, the campus knits together hospital and emergency services, affiliated medical offices and specialty outpatient services – including convenient underground parking for patients.

The Sutter Health Newborn Connections program will be occupying space on the entry level of the building. From perinatal classes and lactation services to breastfeeding and baby supplies, Newborn Connections provides expecting families with a range of support from pregnancy to parenthood.

“We’ve been looking forward to the ‘birth’ of this vibrant space to provide families with easy access to all of CPMC’s Newborn Connections classes and services,” said Paula Sulkis, supervisor of the Newborn Connections program. “With Sutter’s new CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital located directly across the street, the need for mom, baby and new families to pop in and out of multiple facilities all over town just to make their appointments is eliminated.”

Designed to achieve LEED Silver certification, the MOB was constructed and operates in an environmentally conscious way.

The building will feature:

  • A reduction of water use by 40 percent with water efficient fixtures
  • An energy reduction of 35 percent through lighting control design
  • A 2-year contract to purchase at least 8 kwh/gsf of green power
  • 25 percent of materials made from recycled content
  • 75 percent of building waste diverted from landfill
  • Certified low-emitting materials used in furniture and no urea formaldehyde in any wood composites
  • Bike parking and storage as well as showers and storage rooms that encourage alternate transportation

By the numbers

  • Planning and design completed in July 2017
  • 250,000 sq. ft. total; 114,000 sq. ft. available for Sutter provider clinics
  • Capacity for 129 providers
  • 20,000 sq. ft. for Ancillary Services, including a lab, imaging and Newborn Connections
  • Six-level, subterranean parking structure, with 383 parking spaces and a staff-only tunnel that connects the building to the CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital

Services Offered

The medical office building features the following services from the Sutter Health Network:

  • Comprehensive neuroscience center
  • Cardiovascular services
  • Maternity and women’s health services
  • General and complex gastroenterology
  • Surgical specialties
  • Outpatient imaging
  • Advanced organ therapies (organ transplant)
  • Women’s ultrasound
  • Outpatient laboratory and imaging
  • Newborn Connections (support and lactation consulting for new parents)

Royal Baby Birth Celebrated at CPMC’s Van Ness Campus with Newborn Coronations

Posted on May 6, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, People, Scroll Images, Women's Services

Brittney and Trevor Moore with baby girl Harlow

San Francisco—Newborns at California Pacific Medical Center’ (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital celebrated the royal

Kunal Jain and Isha Bhatnayar with baby boy Kiaan Jain

baby’s arrival on May 6 with nine newborn births of their own, each presented with a gold crown. These eight girls and one boy will forever share a special day with the royal couple’s new arrival.

The crowns these babies are donning were hand-made by CPMC nurse, June Shiraki, who’s been crocheting beanies for newborns at CPMC for the past 7 years. Coronations took place throughout the day as the new babies eased into their first day. Nurse Shiraki was on hand to help assist with coronations as we celebrated this day with the Sussexes.

 

Beanies for Babies: CPMC Nurse Gives Back by Making Snuggly Hats

Posted on May 3, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, People, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO–June Shiraki R.N., started her career in nursing in 1993 as a nurse’s aide in telemetry at the California Pacific Medical Center’s (CPMC) Pacific Campus. She followed in the footsteps of her mother who started working at CPMC’s California Campus in 1974. But it was a patient that really encouraged June to actually become a nurse and follow her passion to care for others.

In the spirit of generosity and to thank patients for having their babies at CPMC, June crochets a beanie-style hat for each newborn in her care. She receives heartfelt thank-yous every time she presents a hat to a mother. Shiraki acknowledges that patients keep the hats as generational keepsakes, some going to lengths of preserving them in hope chest. She even has “repeat” patients!

“It is amazing how people come back and ask for me when they deliver their next child,” said Shiraki. “I even have people who recognize me when I am traveling in Hawaii or Tahoe and they come up to me to say how wonderful their experience was.”

According to “hat math” calculations, Shiraki crochets 20 hats a week, which totals more than 1,000 hats a year. “I didn’t realize how many hats I have made. I guess I make a lot of hats,” she exclaimed. “Everywhere I go I have a ball of yarn and a needle so I am crocheting all the time…even on the plane to Hawaii.”

Shiraki is happy and appreciative to be the second generation in her family to work at CPMC. She also expresses gratitude for her patients and thinks fondly of the one who set her life’s work into motion. “I am thankful for the positive interactions I have with patients. It is just so heartwarming and I am happy to give back in the name of Camilla, the patient who inspired me to become a nurse to begin with.”

 

Leading Neurologist Gives Insight on Stroke Care Innovation

Posted on May 2, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO – Every second counts in detecting and treating stroke, the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the U.S. Each year, approximately 795,000 people suffer a stroke. New research at Sutter Health is helping bring faster, life-changing care to stroke patients through a clinical trial called BEST-MSU that will test the efficacy of Sutter’s Mobile Stroke Unit (MSU).

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Real-Time Research: Using Insights to Help Healthcare Today and Tomorrow

Posted on Apr 20, 2019 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Research, Scroll Images, Transformation

SAN FRANCISCO – New research shows that weight loss during the first 12 weeks of a year-long behavioral lifestyle program can predict which participants will achieve weight loss after completing the program. This revelation, along with several others, were shared by Sutter Health’s Center for Health Systems Research (CHSR) during the recent annual meeting of the Health Care Systems Research Network (HCSRN) in Portland.

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Robotic Germ Zapper Helps Bring Down Infectious Disease

Posted on Apr 18, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SAN FRANCISCO –A germ-zapping robot called LightStrike from Xenex is used at California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) hospitals to help curb the spread of infectious diseases. This mobile robotic device is used in intensive care units, medical surgery units, operating rooms and in rooms where patients suffering from Clostridioides difficile (also known as C. diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other microorganisms, were discharged. CPMC, part of Sutter Health’s integrated network of care in Northern California, now employs this mobile robotic technology at all campus locations—with a total of seven in operation.

The LightStrike robot emits 67 bright pulses of (UV) light per second that bounce into walls, floors, ceilings and hard-to-clean places where manual cleaning might miss. The UV light is absorbed by and fuses the DNA of microorganisms, causing the cell to break apart and dissolve, deactivating pathogens. A patient room can be disinfected in less than 15 minutes using this system.

The LightStrike robot is not a replacement for manual disinfecting and cleaning by staff. It is another tool used in the hospitals to enhance staffs’ efforts to combat infectious diseases and to create a safer, cleaner environment for patients and their families.

Internal data shows a decline in infectious diseases at CPMC due to an overarching effort associated with training, improved hand hygiene, and diligence in disinfecting patient rooms after discharge — which includes the use of the Xenex technology.

Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Sutter Roseville Medical Center –CPMC’s sister hospitals in the Valley — also use the Xenex germ-zapping robots to assist in their efforts to disinfect rooms. They have also seen similar declines in rates of infectious diseases.