Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

Happy Ending to Librarian’s Story, Thanks to Coordinated Care

Posted on Feb 12, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Neuroscience, Quality, Scroll Images

BERKELEY, Calif. –When retired UC Berkeley librarian Barbara Kornstein walked into her neighborhood bakery for pastry and coffee on a recent January morning, she never imagined that within moments her fellow patrons would be calling 911 for help after she suffered a stroke and fell from her chair. Fortunately, a dedicated team of first responders, nurses and doctors were close by to coordinate the treatment that would save Kornstein’s life.

Within 30 minutes from the 911 call to the Berkeley Fire Department, Kornstein was evaluated by a doctor with special training in stroke management in the emergency department at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network of care.

After undergoing a CT scan, Kornstein received clot-dissolving medication and was quickly transferred to the hospital catheterization lab, where a neurologist specially trained in neurointervention removed the blood clot from her brain through a minimally invasive procedure that significantly reduces the risk of stroke-related disability and death.

“Barbara is doing remarkably well thanks to the seamless coordination of care that she received at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s Regional Stroke Center,” says Brian Richardson, M.D., medical director of Alta Bates Summit’s stroke program. “Our program is nationally recognized for ensuring stroke patients receive life-saving intervention urgently upon arrival. Barbara’s story is just one example of our commitment to making sure stroke patients receive the very best care possible.”

“I go to the New York International Film Festival every year and I’m so glad that I will be able to attend this year’s festival in September,” says Kornstein. “I’m feeling great and I’m so thankful for all the people that helped saved my life.”

A few days after her stroke, Barbara was resting comfortably in the Alta Bates Summit Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit in Oakland when she received a visit from Chris Barney and Nick Scornaich from the Berkeley Fire Department who were the first to respond to the 911 call. Barney and Scornaich were joined by members of the Alta Bates Summit Emergency Department, Cath Lab, Intensive Care Unit, Regional Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Center and surgery teams that all played a part in Kornstein’s care.

“It’s wonderful and a bit overwhelming to meet all the people who cared for me,” says Kornstein. “I’m glad that I live so close and have access to such great medical care.”

“It’s quite moving to see everyone that had a touch in Barbara’s care shower her with love and words of encouragement,” says Debra Blanchard, R.N., Stroke Center Coordinator at Alta Bates Summit. “She’s doing great and it’s a testament to our first responders and our stroke team for their ability to provide timely treatment so that people who suffer strokes have the potential to have great outcomes like Barbara.”

Helping Mind the Gap on Cardiovascular Diseases

Posted on Feb 7, 2020 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Cardiac, Expanding Access, Innovation, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Medical Foundation, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Heart valve imaging
Heart valve imaging

Lifesavers appear in big sizes and small. For patient Adam Livingstone, rescue was a dime-sized clip that restored his heart’s normal rhythm and size. For months, Livingstone had been experiencing shortness of breath, chest pain and fatigue. Diagnosed with mitral valve regurgitation, a minimally invasive procedure to repair the valve was performed at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento—one of Sutter’s sites where researchers evaluate new devices for treating damaged or diseased heart valves.

The Heart’s Finely Orchestrated Blood Flow

Heart valves
Heart valves

Like a musical conductor, the heart oversees rhythm and flow, circulating blood to each of its chambers in a coordinated, unidirectional symphony.

THE MITRAL VALVE

Mitral regurgitation, the most common type of heart valve disorder, occurs when blood leaks backward through the mitral valve when the left ventricle closes.

Some patients undergo non-surgical heart valve repair with transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) with MitraClip®.2 During the procedure, doctors thread a catheter into a large leg vein reaching the heart. Then a dime-sized clip clamps the improperly working valve, allowing it to close more tightly with less backward blood flow.

“Some research participants recover faster and resume normal activities within a week of the procedure, and may not require lifelong anticoagulant medications, repeat surgeries, or re-hospitalization,” says David Roberts, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, medical director of cardiovascular services at Sutter in the Valley Area.

A new clinical trial at Sutter called PASCAL CLASP IID/IIF will test the safety and effectiveness of TMVR with the PASCAL Transcatheter Valve Repair System® compared with MitraClip® in patients with mitral regurgitation.3

For patients with severe mitral regurgitation, Sutter’s CPMC seeks to enroll patients in a clinical trial called SM3, which assesses the safety and efficacy of the SAPIEN M3 System™.4

“In this study, we are evaluating a new type of mitral valve that may provide a minimally invasive alternative to surgery for high-risk patients with severe mitral valve disease,” says David Daniels, M.D., co-director of Sutter’s Structural Heart Program in the Bay Area, and principal investigator of the SM3 clinical trial at Sutter.

Some patients develop mitral valve disease when calcium deposits accumulate on the fibrous ring attached to the mitral valve leaflets. For these patients with mitral annular calcification (MAC), Sutter will begin offering enrollment in the Summit clinical trial, which will test the safety and effectiveness of the Tendyne™ transcatheter mitral valve.5

“Previous approaches to treat patients with MAC have mainly involved the off-label use of transcatheter aortic valves,” says Dr. Roberts. “But this strategy may lead to residual mitral regurgitation and the need for open-heart surgery. Sutter’s participation in Summit may lead to novel ways to care for this hard-to-treat subset of patients.”

THE TRICUSPID AND AORTIC VALVES

Although a skilled conductor, sometimes the heart needs help to maintain proper blood flow for musical perfection. To the rescue: Sutter researchers test interventional devices designed to treat patients with diseased or damaged tricuspid and aortic valves.

In one new clinical trial, Sutter researchers will collect information about treatment for severe aortic regurgitation, a condition typically treated with aortic valve replacement surgery.

This study will examine the use of TAVR (Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement), a minimally invasive procedure designed to replace the aortic valve inside the heart. In this study, TAVR will be performed using the JenaValve™ Pericardial TAVR System, designed to help treat patients with severe aortic regurgitation or severe aortic stenosis.6

“Until now, all commercially available TAVR valves have focused on aortic stenosis, or a restricted valve,” says Dr. Daniels, co-principal investigator of the TAVR with JenaValve™ clinical trial at Sutter. “The JenaValve™ may allow researchers to treat patients with a leaky valve in the absence of any calcium. Currently these patients are only candidates for open-heart surgery.”

Additionally, Sutter researchers at CPMC and Sutter Medical Center are seeking to enroll patients who have tricuspid regurgitation in a clinical trial called TRILUMINATE.

The TRILUMINATE study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Tricuspid Valve Repair System™ (TVRS) for treating moderate or severe tricuspid regurgitation in patients currently on medical management and who are deemed appropriate for percutaneous transcatheter intervention.7

  • Learn more about Sutter cardiovascular diseases research and clinical trials.
  • If you are suffering from mitral or tricuspid valve regurgitation, aortic valve stenosis or other heart valve disorder, talk to your cardiologist to see if research participation and/or valve replacement or repair is right for you.

References:

  1. American Heart Association.
  2. MitraClip™ is manufactured by Abbott Medical Devices.
  3. The PASCAL clinical trial is sponsored by Edwards Life Sciences, makers of the Transcatheter Valve Repair System®.
  4. The S3 clinical trial is sponsored by Edwards Life Sciences, makers of the SAPIEN M3 System™.
  5. The Summit clinical trial is sponsored by Abbott Medical Devices, makers of the Tendyne System™.
  6. The JenaValve™ clinical trial is sponsored by JenaValve Technology, Inc., makers of the Pericardial Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) System.
  7. The TRILUMINATE clinical trial is sponsored by Abbott Medical Devices, makers of the Tricuspid Valve Repair System™.

Sutter Research: Advancing Care for Patients with Breast Cancer

Posted on Oct 21, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, Innovation, Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Quality, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Transformation, Women's Services

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – Breast cancer research has the potential to improve cancer care for the 3.8 million American women living with the illness. Recognizing Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we’re highlighting the bold science and game-changing breast cancer research at Sutter. This work can help advance knowledge of how to detect and treat the illness.

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Rare Hospital-Based Treatment Program Helps People Beat Addiction

Posted on Oct 17, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images

(OAKLAND, Calif.)Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s Merritt Peralta Institute (MPI) for chemical dependency treatment has helped more than 15,000 people since its founding in 1979. At 40 years old, MPI is the oldest hospital-based addiction detoxification and treatment program in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Hospital-based treatment means that the MPI staff is able to treat people for drug and/or alcohol addiction who also have underlying medical conditions such as diabetes or cancer.

“There are only six hospital-based inpatient treatment centers like ours in all of California,” says Terry Arnold, MPI program manager. “Having access to a doctor and 24-hour nursing care makes our program unusual. We take a lot of pride in providing comprehensive care to our participants and we look forward to offering these services for many more decades to come.”

MPI is a voluntary treatment program that provides comprehensive treatment for addiction with the caring, ongoing support and medical attention needed to understand the disease of chemical dependency and make the transition to recovery.

“What has set our program apart over the last 40 years is our highly trained staff who have dedicated themselves to care for our participants and their families,” says Arnold.

To meet the diverse needs of MPI clients over the years, the 24-bed program has expanded access to accommodate more participants dealing with addiction to opioids and other pain killers.

“Over the last 15 years, we have seen a large increase in opioid addiction, with 25 percent of our program participants now receiving care for it,” adds Arnold. “I’m proud of how our program has evolved and accommodated to meet the demand.”

Addiction-Free Pain Management

At MPI, opiate-addicted people with chronic physical pain learn alternative techniques to dealing with it, including the use of non-addictive medications and acupuncture, guided imagery, hypnosis and restorative yoga.

MPI is a full-service addiction treatment program which offers:

  • medically-supervised detoxification
  • inpatient and residential rehabilitation
  • day treatment
  • morning and evening intensive outpatient programs
  • comprehensive family program
  • continuing care services to offer the support needed to stay in recovery
  • complementary therapies like yoga, acupuncture and NeuroAdvantage—a drug-free technology used to train the nervous system to activate a relaxation response

Clinical Excellence and Tailored Treatment Plans

MPI is certified by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). To achieve this certification, MPI demonstrates that it conforms to rigorous and internationally-recognized standards.

Each MPI participant works directly with the medical staff and chemical dependency counselors to develop a customized treatment plan tailored to their specific needs and preferences.

Recovery can begin the moment you are ready to stop the cycle of addiction and reclaim your life. To schedule an assessment interview at MPI or for more information, call 510-652-7000.

Stupski Foundation to Enhance Palliative Care for Alameda County Patients with $3.5 Million Grant to Sutter Health

Posted on Sep 30, 2019 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Eden Medical Center, Expanding Access, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Scroll Images

(OAKLAND, Calif) –The Stupski Foundation has awarded not-for-profit Sutter Health a $3.5 million, three-year grant to build a comprehensive Palliative and Advanced Illness Care (PAIC) program for northern Alameda County.

This significant grant will enable Sutter to build on successful palliative care programs already in place at the healthcare network’s Alameda County hospitals, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland and Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, while incorporating elements of both the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s (PAMF) innovative ambulatory palliative care and support services program and Sutter’s impactful home-based Advanced Illness Management Program.

The grant will help caregivers at these Sutter organizations integrate palliative and advanced illness care services across care settings, to provide more continuous and comprehensive support for patients and families facing serious illness. This collaborative model extends services to thousands of additional people in the county who suffer from the complex challenges of serious illnesses such as cancer, dementia or advanced heart, lung or kidney disease, by providing more timely, seamless and flexible services to address their physical, social, emotional and spiritual needs. Multidisciplinary palliative care teams at Sutter include specially trained doctors, nurse practitioners, nurses, social workers, chaplains and other specialists.

“We are honored to partner with the Stupski Foundation to improve patient and family experience by enhancing serious illness care across Alameda County,” says Elizabeth Mahler, M.D., Sutter Health Vice President Clinical Integration, Office of Patient Experience. “This generous grant will help us serve thousands more patients and families with collaborative care that seeks to decrease suffering by putting the personal preferences, needs and values of patients and families front and center.”

“Sutter Health has been recognized as a national leader in serious illness care since the creation of its Advanced Illness Management (AIM) program,” Dan Tuttle, director of health at the Stupski Foundation says. “This grant supports their efforts to roll out an even more comprehensive palliative care model for people with serious illness, bringing home-based care to hundreds of patients and new inpatient and outpatient services to thousands more throughout Alameda County every year. We hope that healthcare continues to move from inside clinic walls to meet people where they need it and we see quality home-based palliative care as a critical part of that shift.”

Reaching More Patients in Need

Sutter Health Palliative and Advanced Illness Management programs serving Alameda County are running close to maximum capacity, currently serve about 3,000 patients annually. Sutter palliative care program leaders estimate that an additional 2,000 patients will benefit from improved PAIC coordination, capacity and services made possible by the Stupski Foundation grant.

This new comprehensive model of care in Alameda County will encompass four key components of serious illness care including specialty palliative care, advance care planning, family caregiver support and links to social services.

“This grant gives Sutter the opportunity to more broadly provide compassionate care to the communities we serve. It will allow us to create a path of care, comfort and support for those patients and families who are facing an advanced illness in a way that we have previously not been able to provide,” says Jeffrey Stoneberg, DO, Palliative Care Medical Director at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center.

Sutter will launch the ambulatory based PAIC program at Alta Bates Summit next year, followed by Eden starting in 2021.

Thinking of Vaping? Think Again! Surgeon Warns of Vaping Health Dangers

Posted on Sep 7, 2019 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Community Benefit, Quality, Scroll Images

OAKLAND, Calif. — Alta Bates Summit Medical Center director of Cardiovascular Services, Junaid Khan, M.D., is featured in Business Insider, ABC7 and  KTVU Fox 2 stories about the terrible health risks physicians are seeing in patients, especially young people and older people with underlying health conditions such as asthma, who vape. Alta Bates Summit is part of the not-for-profit Sutter Health integrated network of care.

Dr. Khan cites the alarming increase in the pace at which vaping-related illnesses and deaths are now being reported as he warns that vaping has become a public health crisis. He emphasizes that vaping can cause permanent, lifelong lung damage and that vaping is equally bad, if not worse, than smoking.