Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

Mammography Goes Mobile

Posted on Oct 9, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Women's Services


The Carol Ann Read Breast Health Center at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, part of Sutter Health’s not-for-profit integrated network of care, has launched a new mobile mammography van to provide convenient access to screening mammography services for underserved women and help improve early detection of breast cancer.

“Finding breast cancer at its earliest possible stage is critical to survival, and early detection through regular mammograms remains the best defense against the disease,” says oncologic surgeon Eileen Consorti, M.D., medical director of the Carol Ann Read Breast Health Program. “As a breast cancer survivor, this cause is very personal to me. The mobile mammography van will provide screenings to hundreds of women each year, many of whom are uninsured or underinsured.”

Beginning this month, the 40-foot van will travel to community-based health care clinics in the East Bay and surrounding communities to provide mammography services to underserved women. The van will eventually travel to senior centers, houses of worship, health fairs and businesses once the COVID-19 threat lessens, broadening access to critical breast health services while providing the same high-quality care as patients who come to Carol Ann Read Breast Health Center locations.

“Access to affordable and convenient breast cancer screenings can be lifesaving. Our mobile mammography unit will help our team bring advanced technology to patients in our community that most need it,” says Alta Bates Summit Medical Center CEO David Clark.

The new mobile mammography van is equipped with 3D mammography (digital breast tomosynthesis) and also offers a comfortable waiting area as well as a private changing and exam room.

The van is made possible by a grant from Peter Read, co-founder of Grocery Outlet in honor of his wife Carol Ann Read who passed away from breast cancer, and a Sutter match grant.

Read has worked collaboratively with Alta Bates Summit administrators and physicians to raise funds to update breast screening equipment in the East Bay and provide for the needs of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer for many years. He has also funded educational events to raise breast cancer awareness within Latino and African American communities.

Although the pain of losing Carol Ann will never go away, Peter Read is comforted by the impact his philanthropy has made. “This investment in Alta Bates Summit gives me great personal satisfaction,” he says. “I am excited about reaching even more women with the mobile mammography.”

Hungry People Fed through Food Waste Reduction Pilot

Posted on Sep 1, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Eden Medical Center, Innovation, Memorial Hospital, Los Banos, Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, People, Scroll Images, Sutter Amador Hospital, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Sutter Solano Medical Center, Sutter Tracy Hospital

35,000 meals donated in first seven months of project

SACRAMENTO, Calif. –In its first seven months, a pilot project involving 14 Sutter hospitals reduced food waste and fed the hungry by donating nearly 35,000 meals to 17 local nonprofits. The effort comes at a critical time as increasing numbers of people experience food insecurity due to the pandemic-induced economic downturn.

Last January, 10 hospitals in Sutter Health’s integrated network launched a collaboration with nonprofit Health Care Without Harm to implement the program, which is partially funded by a grant from the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) through California Climate Investments. Over the summer, an additional four Sutter hospitals joined in Sutter’s efforts.

“From our earliest days, Sutter Health’s network has provided access to high-quality, affordable medical care in our facilities – but we’ve also been deeply invested in the health and wellbeing of our broader communities,” says Chief Medical Officer Stephen H. Lockhart, M.D., Ph.D., executive sponsor of Sutter Health’s Environmental Stewardship program. “The teams behind this project with Copia and Health Care Without Harm are putting our values into action by leveraging innovation to not only reduce our environmental footprint, but also help feed community members in need.”

The work is powered by a technology platform designed by San Francisco-based Copia – a zero waste and hunger technology platform that allows food service employees to measure and prevent food waste while seamlessly donating all unsold or unserved edible excess food. Hospital food services workers measure daily food waste and submit their edible food donations in one streamlined process through Copia’s software application on mobile tablets. Copia’s mobile app then automatically dispatches drivers to pick up and deliver the food to local non-profits feeding food insecure populations.

And local really does mean local in this case – the average distance donated food traveled from the hospitals to someone who needed it was 3.4 miles.

In its first week in the program, Sutter Delta Medical Center recovered nearly 140 pounds of surplus food from the hospital—enough for 116 meals for Love a Child Missions, which serves homeless women and children in Contra Costa County, and Light Ministries Pentecostal Church of God, which serves meals to needy families in Antioch.

“This is an exciting partnership,” says Sutter Delta’s assistant administrator Tim Bouslog. “We’ve always had a vested interest in sustainability at our hospital, and the positive impact on the community during these difficult times makes this a great step forward.”

Another program benefit? The food donations efforts have helped Sutter reduce carbon emissions by 185,000 pounds and saved 15 million gallons of water!

Says Maria Lewis, director of Food and Nutrition Services at Sutter’s Eden Medical Center, “Eden’s first donation provided 45 meals to The Salvation Army in Hayward. This one donation not only consisted of 55 pounds of perfectly edible food, but also saved 241 pounds of CO2 emissions. We are humbled to be able to support our community, as well as help preserve our environment in the same process.”

“Over the first six months of this pilot project, we have gained valuable insight into how to contribute to community health, reduce waste and be good stewards of our own resources,” says Jack Breezee, regional food and nutrition services director for Sutter’s Valley Area. “I can only look forward to what we will learn over the pilot’s remaining year, and how we can build on these successes to serve our patients and communities.”

“Food waste among hospitals is a solvable problem,” says Komal Ahmad, founder of Copia. “If every hospital in the U.S. partnered with Copia, we could provide more than 250 million meals each year to people in need and save hundreds of millions of dollars in purchasing and production of food. Copia is thrilled to partner with Sutter Health to lead the healthcare industry in filling the food insecurity gap and building community resilience, especially during a time when insecurity has never been higher.”

Participating Sutter hospitals are Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Eden Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, Memorial Hospital Los Banos, Memorial Medical Center, Sutter Amador Hospital, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Center for Psychiatry, Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Sutter Solano Medical Center and Sutter Tracy Community Hospital.

COVID-19 and Wildfire Smoke: Doctor Answers Masking Questions

Posted on Aug 20, 2020 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Safety, Scroll Images

OAKLAND, Calif. –Wildfire season is suddenly upon us and thick smoke from multiple wildfires around Northern California, coupled with hot weather and the COVID-19 pandemic, has led to some confusion about masks: when to wear them and what type is best.

Now Ronn Berrol, M.D., medical director for Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s emergency department in Oakland, offers tips to help you and your loved ones stay healthy in the Q & A below and in this KTVU interview.

Q: It’s so hot and smoky out! Do I need to wear a mask?

A: Yes! It’s important that everyone who can medically do so continues to wear a mask when they are in public to help reduce the spread of COVID-19. Between the heat, the smoky air and COVID-19, the virus still poses a significant risk.

Q: Does it matter what type of mask I wear? Will a homemade mask protect me or do I need an N95 mask?

A: With respect to COVID-19, for most people it’s probably more important that you wear a mask whenever you are in public than the type of mask you wear. This is because the COVID-19 virus is transmitted to others by droplets that people produce when they exhale—and especially when they cough, laugh, sing or speak loudly. By wearing a mask, you help protect the people around you.

If you have a lung condition such as asthma, emphysema or COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), that makes you more susceptible to wildfire smoke, the type of mask you wear becomes more important. This is because tiny particulates and chemicals in the smoke can cause inflammation or difficulty breathing. And homemade cloth masks or surgical masks are not very effective at filtering out harmful particulates and chemicals from the smoky air. To filter out these particulates, an N95 mask is preferred. However, N95 masks can be more difficult to breathe through and lead to more overheating when it’s hot out.* So my advice is to stay indoors, keep doors and windows closed and use air conditioning and an air purifier, if you have them. I also recommend changing your home’s air filter and running the air conditioner in your car on recirculate so you’re not pulling outside air in.

Q: What else can I do to protect myself from the heat and the smoke?

A: It’s always a good idea to keep hydrated –when you are well-hydrated, your body can better respond to infectious challenges and the mucous membranes in your nose and lungs are better able to protect your body from environmental insults like smoke particulates. If you have asthma, emphysema or other respiratory illness, use your maintenance inhalers as directed by your doctor and be sure to carry your rescue inhaler with you if you do have to leave your home. Contact your doctor if you experience symptoms such as asthma, difficulty breathing or chest pain.

Read more about wildfire smoke and its effect on lung health here.

Read more about Sutter’s respiratory care clinics here.

*Important note: Some N95 masks have valves in them that vent exhaled breath without any filtration. Though they may be helpful to filter out wildfire particulates, these vented N95 masks will not provide protection for nearby individuals in the event the wearer has COVID-19.

Doctor Warns Delaying Care Is Not Without Risk

Posted on Jul 28, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Scroll Images

OAKLAND, Calif. –A Bay Area physician is warning people that delaying critical or preventive care because of fears of COVID-19 could have detrimental effects on their health.

Junaid Khan, MD
Junaid Khan, MD

In an interview with KPIX 5’s CBSN, Junaid Khan, M.D., a cardiothoracic surgeon and director of cardiovascular services at Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, says some concern about coming to hospitals or care centers during a pandemic is understandable, but delaying care should be balanced against the need to maintain good health.

“What we’re concerned about is some patients are afraid to come to the hospital and delaying care for serious problems such as heart attacks, stroke and even lung cancer,” says Khan. “Putting off care for chest pain or trouble breathing could lead to serious health consequences, like irreversible heart damage.”

Khan says patients should feel reassured because hospitals in the Sutter Health integrated network of care are taking extraordinary measures to help keep patients safe, from increasing the frequency of cleaning and disinfecting spaces, to testing all hospitalized patients, screening employees for signs and symptoms of COVID-19 before each shift, restricting visitors and requiring masks.

Learn more about the precautions Sutter hospitals and care centers are taking to help protect everyone’s health.

Preventive Care is Crucial

But it’s not just emergency care that’s critical, says Khan. “We want patients to get their regular preventive care including cancer screenings, treatment for chronic conditions like asthma, high blood pressure or diabetes, as well as vaccinations. Some parents are putting their kids at risk by skipping vaccinations and that is worrisome —we don’t want a measles outbreak.”

Read more about why preventive care like vaccinations is critical for kids.

People who are concerned about coming in for preventive care should call their doctors’ office or schedule a video visit, says Khan. “Start there,” he says, “then you’ll know if you need to come in for an in-person visit.”

Learn more about getting care during COVID-19 here.

Sutter Hospitals Honored By U.S. News & World Report

Posted on Jul 28, 2020 in Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Memorial Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Three hospital campuses within Sutter Health’s not-for-profit, integrated network of care achieved recognition today as among the best hospitals in California for 2020-2021 from U.S. News & World Report. The annual rankings rate top hospitals in the state and in major metropolitan regions according to their performance across 26 adult specialties, procedures and conditions.

Sutter hospital campuses ranked among the top 50 in the state include:

California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus* (High-performing in five procedures/conditions and four specialties)
Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento (High-performing in six procedures/conditions and one specialty)
Sutter Roseville Medical Center (High-performing in five procedures/conditions)

Coming just outside of the top 50 were Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus in Oakland and Mills-Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame, both ranking at 51. Both hospitals had high-performing rankings in three procedures/conditions.

Three Sutter hospitals are among the top 10 hospitals in the San Francisco metro area, including Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus, California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus* and Mills-Peninsula Medical Center. Additionally, two Sutter hospitals are among the top 10 hospitals in the Sacramento metro area, including Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Sutter Roseville Medical Center.

Seven additional Sutter hospital campuses earned recognition today as “high performers” in at least one adult specialty, condition or procedure, including:

• Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Alta Bates Campus in Berkeley (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)
• Alta Bates Summit Medical Center – Summit Campus in Oakland (High-performing in three procedures/conditions)
Memorial Medical Center (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)
• Mills-Peninsula Medical Center (High-performing in three procedures/conditions)
Stanislaus Surgical Hospital (High-performing in one procedure/condition)
Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital (High-performing in one procedure/condition)
Sutter Delta Medical Center (High-performing in two procedures/conditions)

“Safety and quality are in our DNA,” said Bill Isenberg, M.D., chief quality and safety officer for Sutter Health. “Recognitions like these honor our network’s doctors, nurses, clinicians and employees who compassionately care for patients and their families across Northern California.”

Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network set out to build a truly integrated system—one that offers comprehensive patient services and quality health programs tailored to the diverse communities it serves. Today, Sutter Health cares for more than 3 million patients throughout its Northern California network of physicians, hospitals, home health providers and other services. Its coordination and focus on standardizing best practices reduce complications in care, lower hospital readmission rates and bring down the total cost of care.

“For more than 30 years, U.S. News & World Report has been helping patients, along with the help of their physicians, identify the Best Hospitals in an array of specialties, procedures and conditions,” said Ben Harder, managing editor and chief of health analysis at U.S. News. “The hospitals that rise to the top of our rankings and ratings have deep medical expertise, and each has built a track record of delivering good outcomes for patients.”

The U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals survey ranked hospitals according to risk-adjusted survival and readmission rates, volume, patient experience, patient safety, quality of nursing care, physician surveys and other care-related indicators.

For more information and complete rankings, visit U.S. News & World Report.

*Many of the services recognized had originally been performed at California Pacific Medical Center – Pacific Campus and are now located at California Pacific Medical Center – Van Ness Campus.

Paying it Forward: Alta Bates Summit Virtual Food Drive Raises $13.4K

Posted on Jul 17, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

OAKLAND, Calif. –The outpouring of support from East Bay communities for the staff and physicians of Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center during the pandemic has been humbling. Community members from Oakland and Berkeley have donated cases of personal protective equipment and hot meals for staff, mailed letters of gratitude, and local first-responders even organized a mile-long healthcare hero parade –all demonstrating the community’s support for frontline healthcare workers.

To return the gratitude and give something back to the people who most need it right now, Heidi Voellger, RN, assistant nurse manager for the Alta Bates Summit emergency department in Oakland, organized a virtual food drive for the Alameda County Community Food Bank (ACCFB). Together, thirteen departments at the medical center raised over $13,400 to help provide much-needed food for struggling community members.

“When the COVID-19 emergency took hold, we experienced a 1,000 percent increase in calls to the food bank’s emergency food helpline – more than half were from households that had never reached out for help before,” said Suzan Bateson, executive director of Alameda County Community Food Bank. “Communities impacted hardest by this emergency are in places where we’re already serving. Months into our emergency response effort ACCFB and its Network of Member Agencies continue to respond to unprecedented need and we are bracing for a prolonged response. Our partners will be critical for the duration of this crisis, and beyond, and we’re extremely grateful to Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center for stepping up to nourish neighbors – especially now.” 

“I know the sense of community, family, and comfort that food can provide, and I believe that nourishing the body can also nourish the soul,” says Voellger. “We love this community and have been supported by them for years. Now is the time for us to pay it forward and share a little love!”