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Real-Life Experience without Real-Life Risk

Posted on Mar 25, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Community Benefit, Eden Medical Center, Scroll Images

Eden Trauma Team Teaches Teens about the Dangers of Drinking and Driving

 

CASTRO VALLEY, Calif. – Every 15 minutes someone dies in an alcohol-related car accident. That was the statistic in 1995 when a program called Every 15 Minutes was first adopted by the California Highway Patrol (CHP) to give teens a real-life look at the dangers of drinking and driving.

Thankfully, fewer people die from alcohol-related car accidents these days, but drinking and driving by young people remains a problem—often because teens’ feelings of invincibility can lead to poor decision making.

Eden Medical Center trauma nurses apply moulage makeup to Every 15 Minutes car student accident “victims.”

To encourage teens to think about the consequences of their actions and to prevent alcohol-related car accidents, Sutter’s Eden Medical Center, the regional trauma center for southern Alameda County, has participated in the Every 15 Minutes program for the past 14 years.

The program offers real-life experience without real-life risk. Eden’s trauma nurses apply moulage makeup (mock injuries)

to the accident ‘victims’ to make them appear genuinely injured. Nurses, doctors, anesthesiologists, respiratory therapists and laboratory and radiology technicians from Eden’s trauma team work with public agencies, community organizations and local businesses to create a simulated traffic collision followed by rescue workers transporting “injured” students to Eden’s emergency department. The drama is videotaped and shared with students at a school assembly staged to look like a memorial service for the car crash “victims.”

Watch the 2019 Amador, Dublin and San Leandro high school student videos featuring Eden trauma team staff on YouTube.

Each Every 15 Minutes exercise, which takes place over two days, also involves the “living dead” –students who are removed from classrooms at 15-minute intervals to dramatize the toll of drunk driving. At an overnight retreat, students are taught strategies for making good decisions and learn how to be champions for not drinking and driving.

CALSTAR, Sutter Health’s air medical transport partner, arrives to transport student “victims” to Eden.

Says Eden’s trauma injury prevention specialist Pam Stoker, “From a training standpoint, Every 15 Minutes exercises are an excellent opportunity for our staff to run through a trauma in a practice situation. It’s not real, but they treat it as if it is, so it’s an opportunity for them to assess their skills and ask themselves how they could improve.”

“It’s also great for our trauma team from a morale standpoint,” Stoker continues, “Being part of prevention efforts is really important for the staff because they deal with the aftermath of tragic real-life alcohol-related accidents all the time. This is a way for them to try and make a difference in the community by working to prevent accidents before they happen.”

Eden’s trauma team helps run two Every 15 Minutes programs for local high schools each year, most recently for San Leandro High School and Amador High School in Pleasanton.

Every 15 Minutes student accident “victim” arrives at Eden Medical Center’s heliport.

Participants in the recent programs included the Alameda County Fire Department, Alameda County Sheriff’s Office Coroner’s Bureau and Court Services, The Braddock Foundation, California Highway Patrol, CALSTAR (the Air Medical Transport Provider for Sutter Health), Eden Medical Center Philanthropy, Paramedics Plus, Royal Ambulance, San Leandro Police Department and Santos-Robinson Mortuary.

“To see our own peers on stage, in the film, and act out the crash scene is incredibly powerful. We are able to see people we know and love, people we relate to, demonstrating the consequences of driving under the influence,” said San Leandro High School student, Lily Alvarez.

 

 

When Experience Counts…

Posted on Mar 22, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO — With 38 years of experience, Dr. Fung Lam has delivered more than 5,600 babies at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) and has identified many pregnancy complications that resulted in referrals to specialists. When San Francisco resident Aliisa Rosenthal came to Dr. Lam, during the early stages of her pregnancy

KGO interviews Dr. Fung Lam about Molar Pregnancy

with her second child, everything appeared to be normal.  However, Dr. Lam noticed a rare anomaly on her ultrasound that he had seen before—a molar pregnancy.

A molar pregnancy occurs when the cells that become placental tissue grow at such an accelerated rate that it overwhelms the fetus and typically will not result in a viable fetus. This accelerated growth leads to the development of a tumor which must be surgically removed. Molar pregnancy is rare. In the U.S., 20 women out of 100,000 that will be affected. Women from Asia and South America can experience occurrences as high as 1,300 per 100,000. Of those who experience a molar pregnancy, less than 10 percent result in the tumor being malignant. After a molar pregnancy, 98 percent of women later go on to have normal pregnancies.

According to Dr. Lam, with the use of ultrasound, prenatal care starts much earlier than it did years ago. This allows obstetricians to often identify pregnancy complications much earlier. Because of Dr. Lam’s past experience with identifying the subtitles of a molar pregnancy, Aliisa’s situation was identified early at about nine weeks. She is now doing well and spending precious time with her husband and 2-year-old daughter.

Your Gifts Help Us Bring the Emergency Department to the Patient

Posted on Mar 20, 2019 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Quality, Research, Scroll Images

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S. and the leading cause of adult disability, affecting 800,000 people a year. Time is critical for people who experience a stroke—every minute saves 2 million brain cells.

 

Every minute counts when treating a patient who has had a stroke. Donor support for the Mobile Stroke Unit gives us the tools to help ensure that patients in our community not only survive, but also avoid the debilitating effects of a stroke. Through a research trial this project will also help to inform best practices in stroke treatment nationwide —impacting the care of thousands.

The Mills-Peninsula Hospital Foundation has launched a $2.4 million fundraising campaign to underwrite the cost of operating the Unit for the first 2 years, while a randomized controlled trial is conducted to gauge the effectiveness of the program compared to conventional care.

Invest in the Mobile Stroke Unit.

Preliminary studies have indicated that a Mobile Stroke Unit can reduce the time from ambulance dispatch to treatment to as little as 11 minutes. Sutter Health affiliated Mills-Peninsula Medical Center is the only hospital in Northern California and one of only two hospitals in the state to have a Mobile Stroke Unit.

Research at Sutter Health Shows New Treatment Approach Improves Survival, Reduces Metastasis in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

Posted on Mar 20, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Research, Scroll Images, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Medical Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO – Prostate cancer impacts one in every nine men in the U.S. Although death rates from the disease have declined over the last two decades, over 25,000 men die from prostate cancer annually.

Docetaxel, a chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat other types of cancer, has improved overall survival with limited toxicity in men whose prostate cancers have metastasized and who are no longer sensitive to androgen suppression therapy (i.e., patients are hormone resistant).

Researchers at Sutter Health and other leading centers across the U.S. and Canada hypothesized that adding docetaxel to standard therapy could potentially improve overall survival and other clinical outcomes in men with localized, high-risk prostate cancer.

Read More

Unused Building Gets Medical Makeover in West Roseville

Posted on Mar 15, 2019 in Expanding Access, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Foundation, Transformation

The new Sutter Medical Foundation care center is converted from a building originally intended as a CVS retail store, but never opened.

ROSEVILLE, Calif. – A West Roseville building originally constructed about 10 years ago to be a CVS retail location has been converted by Sutter Medical Foundation into a 17,000-square-foot modern health-care center housing primary-care physicians and associated services.

The new Sutter Medical Foundation West Roseville Care Center at 2050 Blue Oaks Blvd., which opened this week, brings convenient primary care patient services to children, adults and families to the growing community of West Roseville.

“This care center aligns perfectly with Sutter Medical Foundation’s vision to provide health care with the highest levels of quality, access and affordability,” said Sutter Valley Medical Foundation President Theresa Frei. “We are extremely happy to have converted this building into our first care center in West Roseville.”

The existing building was erected a decade ago but was never opened as a retail space. Sutter Medical Foundation saw the building’s potential as a medical office building and was able to repurpose and convert it into a beautiful, functional medical facility that will serve thousands of local residents in the growing area of West Roseville.

The conversion to a medical office building is a gorgeous addition to the West Roseville community.

“The project was the culmination of the hard work and coordination of many people from our Sutter Medical Foundation and Sutter Medical Group teams, city planners and business partners in the community,” said Sergio Vincenti, Regional Administrative Director for SMF’s Foothill Region. “Utilizing this existing building to bring health care to this area of Roseville is a win for everyone involved.”

The result of the coordinated discussions and planning efforts is a care center with 17,000 square feet of exam rooms, a lab draw station, and ample parking for patients.

“Having practiced in Roseville for the last four-and-a-half years, I’ve taken care of many patients from the West Roseville area,” said Dr. Craig Corp, a Sutter Medical Group pediatrician who previously practiced at SMF’s 3100 Douglas Blvd. location, nine miles southeast of the new care center. “When I heard that we had an opportunity to move to this location, I jumped at the chance. It gives my patients in this community an option to see me in their own neighborhood. Local care is important to a community, and we are thrilled to be here.”

Dr. Corp is one of the physicians who has moved into the new facility. Here are the Sutter Medical Group clinicians who will see patients in the new care center:

  • Pediatrics: Craig C. Corp, M.D., David Grattendick, M.D., Sarah E. Henshaw, D.O., and Patricia Gurney, N.P.
  • Family Medicine: Barbara Spinelli, M.D., Mark Lam, M.D., and Kathy Lauchaire, P.A.
  • Internal Medicine: Nelson Raitt, M.D. and Lakhvir Kaur, M.D.

The new Sutter Medical Foundation medical office building, which is next to the Fiddyment Farm housing development and just down the street from Sun City, currently has a staff of 28, with 19 of them being newly hired for the opening of the care center. In the near future, Sutter Medical Foundation has plans to add dermatology, an internal medicine advanced practice clinician and another family medicine physician.

“We are so excited to be able to provide care here,” said Susana DeVirgen, Sutter Medical Foundation’s site supervisor for the new care center. “We look forward to providing comprehensive primary care services for our patients at this location for years to come.”

Teacher saved by liver transplant helps open S.F.’s newest hospital

Posted on Mar 15, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO – Among the dignitaries who recently gathered for a ceremonial ribbon cutting marking the opening of California Pacific Medical Center’s (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital, stood a man who was grateful to attend the ceremony for a very personal reason: He almost didn’t survive to see it.

Jennifer Guy, M.D., director of the CPMC Liver Cancer Program with patient Richard Shapiro.

Nearly two years ago, San Francisco resident Richard Shapiro received a life-saving liver transplant at CPMC, part of the not-for-profit Sutter Health network. After several decades of living with the hepatitis C virus, the Lowell High School physics teacher’s liver function was being monitored closely by CPMC liver specialists. In 2014, a follow-up on a suspicious MRI scan revealed a liver tumor. The tumor was successfully removed, but subsequently, his liver function declined and he needed a liver transplant to save his life. After two years on the organ transplant wait list, a donor liver became available. In May 2017, he received the liver transplant that saved his life.

Shapiro feels extraordinarily lucky to have received his transplant surgery at CPMC and says his survival is “a miracle which is the result of the skills, the dedication and the humanity of an amazing liver transplant team working within the Sutter Health network of care.” He is thankful to the dozens of caregivers at CPMC who kept him healthy enough long enough to receive a liver. Says Shapiro, “That’s part of the miracle; the fact that I continue to have the opportunity to do what I love to do—which is to teach physics to the profoundly wonderful students at Lowell.”

Two years post-transplant, he has completely recovered and has returned to his normal activities, including teaching and walking his Potrero Hill neighborhood with his dog.

Shapiro’s participation in the hospital ribbon cutting is a powerful reminder of the primary importance of patients at Sutter and CPMC: our patients’ health is at the heart of what we do every day.