Posts by zavorag

Robot Now Assisting Yuba City Surgeons

Posted on Jul 1, 2019 in Innovation, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Foundation, Sutter North Medical Group

Sutter Surgical Hospital North Valley Offers Robotic-Arm Assisted Total Joint Surgeries

 

Harinder Dhanota, D.O., and his fellow surgeons at Sutter Surgical Hospital North Valley are now using a Mako robot to help them in total joint replacements.

YUBA CITY, Calif. — Sutter Surgical Hospital North Valley surgeons now have access to an advanced treatment option designed to relieve the pain caused by joint degeneration due to osteoarthritis — a disease that affects more than 30 million adults in the United States.

In 2017, the Mako System became the first and only robotic technology that can be used across the joint replacement service line to perform total knee, total hip and partial knee replacements. Sutter Surgical Hospital North Valley is the only hospital in the Yuba-Sutter region — and one of a small number of hospitals in Northern California — to offer this technology.

“We’re proud to be among the first hospitals in Northern California to offer this highly advanced robotic technology,” said Sutter Surgical Hospital North Valley Chief Administrative Officer Dennis Sindelar. “This addition to our orthopedic service line further demonstrates our commitment to providing the community with outstanding healthcare.”

Using a virtual 3-D model, the Mako System allows surgeons to create a patient’s personalized surgical plan pre-operatively before entering the operating room. During surgery, the surgeon can validate that plan and make any necessary adjustments while guiding the robotic-arm to execute that plan.

“With Mako, we can provide each patient with a personalized surgical experience based on their specific diagnosis and anatomy,” said Sutter Medical Foundation orthopedic surgeon Dr. Harinder Dhanota. “It’s exciting to be able to offer this transformative technology across the joint replacement service line to perform total knee, total hip and partial knee replacements.”

Five orthopedic surgeons who practice at Sutter Surgical Hospital have been trained to use the Mako System. The first procedure, a total knee replacement, was performed by Dr. Dhanota on June 25.

For more information, call (530) 749-5746 or email Mako@sutterhealth.org.

‘Black Hawk Down’ Drill Prepares Roseville for Mass Casualty Event

Posted on Jun 19, 2019 in Expanding Access, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Emergency personnel treat and transport a moulaged patient from the Black Hawk “crash.”

ROSEVILLE, Calif. — A military Black Hawk helicopter bringing trauma patients to Sutter Roseville Medical Center was struck by a drone and crash-landed on the SRMC helipad, with about a dozen injured victims crying for help. That was the scenario facing Sutter Roseville’s emergency services team, which partnered with the Roseville and Rocklin fire departments, the Army National Guard and others for an emergency response drill called “Black Hawk Down” on Wednesday, June 19.

Erik Angle, Sutter Roseville’s emergency preparedness coordinator, told Fox 40 during a television interview that it’s important to work with other community agencies and practice these types of scenarios to “know who to talk to and know each other’s protocols and how you would respond so you can work together seamlessly. And that’s critical for any community to have.”

Sutter Roseville registered nurses triage patients at the trauma center entrance.

Sutter Roseville Medical Center is the premier Level II trauma center for a nine-county region that includes the Sierra Nevada and foothills. Victims of fires and other natural disasters and mass-casualty events could be brought to Sutter Roseville for treatment, especially since it is the only Northern California hospital that has a helipad that can support large military-type helicopters like the Black Hawk and even a Chinook.

The backdrop to Wednesday’s drill was the Sutter Roseville construction project that includes an expansion of the hospital’s emergency services, which will double the size and capabilities of the current Emergency Department. Built into that expansion are elements that will be very beneficial during a mass casualty situation, including the ability to convert the new E.D. lobby into a treatment area in a community emergency.

“To practice these (emergency situations) ahead of time is critical,” Angle said. “That way if they do happen in reality, we’ve already worked out all the kinks.”

Already, Angle is planning another community emergency disaster drill early next year to be staged in the new portion of the Emergency Department right before it opens, so that they are well-prepared for any emergency once the new building opens.

Best Employers in Sacramento? Forbes Ranks Sutter No. 1

Posted on Jun 12, 2019 in Affiliates, Carousel, Expanding Access, People, Quality, Scroll Images, We're Awesome

Sutter Health, with hospitals, medical offices and other care facilities throughout Northern California, is the top-ranked Sacramento-based organization on the Forbes list of top employers.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Employees love working for Sutter Health, according to a new list by Forbes. In its first-ever ranking of America’s best employers by state, Sutter Health was listed as Sacramento’s top locally based employer. The Sacramento Bee was first to report the news, and their story is available here.

Using anonymous surveys, Forbes and market research company Statista pinpointed the organizations liked best by employees, according to the Forbes website.

Sutter Health, a not-for-profit healthcare organization in Northern California with 55,000 employees, ranked 26th on California’s list, but took the top spot for employers headquartered in the Sacramento region. Several of the companies listed – including Costco, which is ranked No. 1 in California – are not based in the state. Excluding those employers headquartered out of state, Sutter ranks in the top 20 at No. 17, and is in the top 10 for employers based in Northern California, with such tech giants as H-P, Cisco and Apple.

The Forbes’ list isn’t the only one to rank Sutter organizations as being top-notch employers. During the past 10 years, Modern Healthcare has named several Sutter hospitals and even the entire Sutter Health Valley Area as being Best Places to Work in Healthcare. This year, two hospitals were honored: Sutter Roseville Medical Center and Sutter Amador Hospital.

Sutter Health is more than 60,000 people strong, thanks to our integrated network of clinicians, employees and volunteers. Grounded in our not-for-profit mission, our team members partner to provide access to high quality, affordable care for more than 3 million Northern Californians through our network of hospitals, medical foundations, urgent and walk-in care centers, home health and hospice services.

The full Forbes listing can be accessed here.

Teaching South Placer Schoolchildren How to ‘Stop the Bleed’

Posted on May 29, 2019 in Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Rocklin Elementary students learn how to “stop the bleed,” an easy skill to learn that could save someone’s life.

SOUTH PLACER COUNTY, Calif. – On Jan. 15, 2019, a gunman went on a shooting spree in Placer County. Multiple rounds were fired and many targets were hit. Two people were struck, one was a tragic fatality and one survived. One of the keys that saved his life was his 8-year-old daughter, who held direct pressure on the bleeding wound.

Per the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), traumatic injuries can affect anyone regardless of their age, race or economic status. In the first half of life, more Americans die from injuries and violence, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls or homicides, than from any other cause of death, including cancer, HIV or the flu. This makes injury the leading cause of death among persons from the ages of 1-44.

In many cases of traumatic injuries, bleeding is a preventable cause of death. The ability to recognize life-threatening bleeding and the ability to intervene effectively can save a person’s life. Whether a bleeding traumatic injury is the result of a home accident or shooting, one person – who is on the scene, at the right time and who has the right training – can save a life.

Sutter Roseville Emergency Department Medical Director Jon Perlstein, M.D., teaches a student how to stop the bleed.

To help save lives, the national Stop the Bleed program was developed by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) in 2015. The goal of the program is to turn the average person into “immediate responders,” the first person at the scene of an injury. This person is rarely a trained medical care provider professional emergency responder. No matter how fast the arrival of emergency services, bystanders will always be first on the scene. A person who is bleeding can die from severe blood loss within minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the bleeding. Those nearest to someone with life-threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.

Team members from Sutter Roseville Medical Center Trauma Services, Emergency Preparedness, Critical Care and the Emergency Department along with American Medical Response, Roseville Fire Department, Auburn Fire Department and Rocklin Fire Department have provided Stop the Bleed training to more than 3,000 students in South Placer County and surrounding areas. These courses can be taught to school-aged children from kindergarten to high school and adult learners. Sutter Roseville has also donated more than 80 Stop the Bleed kits to schools in the Rocklin, Newcastle and Roseville school districts.

Additionally, all staff members at the medical center also receive the training.

“Unexpected injuries, whether accidental or intentional, can occur at their place of work, schools or other public areas,” says Erik Angle, Sutter Roseville Emergency Preparedness Coordinator and registered nurse. “Bystanders are the initial help until help arrives. Being trained, prepared and ready can save lives.”

Kate Carleton, Sutter Roseville Trauma Quality Clinical Education Coordinator, states, “The number one cause of early death from trauma is uncontrolled hemorrhage.  Early direct control of bleeding has been clearly shown to save lives.”

This training can and has saved lives across the country and almost anyone of age can easily learn these lifesaving skills. For more information on the Stop the Bleed Program and possible training, please contact Kate Carleton at carletk@sutterhealth.org.

May 2019 is the first ever National Stop the Bleed Month. This nationwide campaign highlights the importance of Stop the Bleed training and provides the public with information and education through local fire, EMS, and health-care professionals.

Sutter Delivers the Best Mother’s Day Gifts: New Babies

Posted on May 12, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, Uncategorized, Women's Services

SACRAMENTO and SAN FRANCISCO — While looking down lovingly at her brand-spanking-new little baby boy, Cody, a tired yet glowingly beautiful Leah Strange of Sacramento pondered how grateful she felt to have given birth on Mother’s Day.

Leah Strange gave birth to baby Cody on Mother’s Day at Sutter Medical Center. Looking at his baby girl is Dad Adam Strange.

“He was overdue,” Leah said, “but I had a feeling he was going to wait it out and make it an extra-special day.”

By Sunday afternoon, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento already made it an extra-special day for 11 women by delivering the best Mother’s Day gift ever – 11 new babies. By the end of the day, it was expected that 15 bundles of joy would be born at what is known by the locals as “Sacramento’s baby hospital,” which has delivered a city worth of babies – nearly 400,000 – in its 95-year history. More than 6,000 babies are born there every year.

Ninety miles west, it was the first Mother’s Day at Sutter CPMC Mission Bernal campus, one of the newest hospitals in Northern California, having replaced the venerable St. Luke’s campus. As extra-special treats, Mission Bernal serenaded new moms with a musical duo from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music to go along with their new, spacious rooms and penthouse views of the City by the Bay.

Janelle McCarthy was born at St. Luke’s, but gave birth to her second daughter, Evelyn, at the new CPMC Mission Bernal hospital campus. With them is Dad Sean McCarthy and their first daughter, Alexandria.

Janelle McCarthy, with her baby, Evelyn, was getting ready to go home, but she and her little family stopped long enough to appreciate the calming classical sounds of the flute-and-guitar duo.

“I am really happy to be at this hospital,” she said. “I was born at St. Luke’s, my first child was born at St. Luke’s, and now my second child was born here at Mission Bernal. They really take care of you here. It’s great.”

In Northern California, more babies are born at Sutter Health hospitals than anywhere else. The CPMC campuses at Mission Bernal and Van Ness deliver half of all babies born in San Francisco, and Mission Bernal is on target for more than 1,000 newborns in its first year. Throughout Northern California, an average of about 85 babies – or almost four kindergarten classes worth – are born at Sutter Health hospitals every single day … and some, like Cody Strange, hold out to be born on Mother’s Day.

“I feel super lucky and fortunate to have the opportunity to carry him and deliver him, and then be healthy and here,” said Leah Strange as she fought back tears. “So, I’m super grateful.”

Charisse Francis and Kalin Green are all smiles with Kalin’s “Mother’s Day gift,” baby Marley-Rose.

Down the hall, though, it sounded more like the Mother’s Day present was for Dad, not Mom.

Charisse Francis of Sacramento looked stunning as she prepared to go home with her third child, a beautiful, little girl named Marley-Rose. Waiting at home are Marley-Rose’s two brothers, who are just 3 and 2 years old.

“I have two boys who really, really love Mom a lot,” said proud papa Kalin Green as he held Marley-Rose. “I understand. I’m a Mama’s boy, and they are too, so I need a Daddy’s girl.” As Charisse laughed, Kalin looked down at his little sweetheart and said, “So this is mine.”