Posts by zavorag

Program Designed to Attract Docs to Rural Areas Receives Accreditation

Posted on May 15, 2020 in Access to Care, Scroll Images

The Sutter Rural Residency Program received a U.S. grant last year and this week was accredited and is ready to screen applicants. Leaders involved in the program include, from left, Dineen Greer, M.D., program director of the Sutter Family Medicine Residency Program; Sutter Amador Hospital CEO Tom Dickson; HRSA regional administrator Capt. John Moroney, M.D; Jackson Mayor Robert Stimpson; Sutter Valley Area Chief Medical Officer Ash Gokli, M.D.; former Sutter Amador CEO Anne Platt; and Robert Hartmann, M.D., longtime Amador County internal medicine physician and an instructor in the Rural Residency Program.

JACKSON, Calif. – Sutter Amador Hospital’s Rural Residency Program this week received accreditation from ACGME (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education), the organization responsible for accrediting all graduate medical training programs for physicians in the United States. This Sutter Health program is designed to bring more primary-care physicians to rural regions, which have been hampered throughout the country by a shortage of family doctors.

The ACGME accreditation allows the Sutter Health Rural Residency Program to begin screening and selecting residency applicants. Those selected – two each year for six total in the program – will complete core inpatient training in Sacramento during the first year, with their next two years on the campus of Sutter Amador Hospital and in community medical offices.

The goal of the Sutter Health program is to develop a sustainable, accredited rural training track in Amador County and to ultimately expand the area’s rural primary-care workforce. In Amador County, there is a high need for primary-care physicians (PCPs) in the area as the ratio of the population to one PCP is 1,760-to-1; the ratio throughout the state of California is 1,280-to-1, according to the County Health Rankings and Roadmaps website.

“This is welcome news for Amador County, as it will provide an influx of bright, young physicians into our community to care for our families and should give us a steady supply of primary-care physicians for years to come,” said longtime Amador County internal medicine physician Robert Hartmann, M.D., who will be one of the instructors in the Rural Residency Program. “This is a major collaborative accomplishment between Sutter Amador Hospital, Sutter Medical Group physicians and the Sutter Family Medicine Residency Program.”

The Rural Residency Program was made possible through a grant from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), which allows not-for-profit Sutter Health to expand its successful Sacramento-based physician residency program to Amador County as part of the federal agency’s efforts to provide better access to quality medical care in rural areas.

Since its inception in 1995, the Sutter Family Medicine Residency Program has graduated 139 physicians, all of whom passed their Board Certification assessments on the first effort. Currently there are 21 residents in the program, and the Amador County program will expand the program to 27 residents.

“We are working to strengthen the physician pipeline throughout our integrated network so our patients receive the same high-quality care no matter where they live,” said Dineen Greer, M.D., program director of the Family Medicine Residency Program. “We have combined a strong, dedicated core faculty, community preceptors, innovative curriculum and access to Sutter hospitals so that our residents develop the skills needed to be outstanding family physicians and leaders in their communities.”

The accreditation was welcome news for the state legislators who serve the Gold Country. State Sen. Andreas Borgeas said: “The physician shortage continues to be a prevalent issue in Amador County and many rural areas of California. I offer my sincere congratulations and gratitude to Sutter Health on the program’s latest achievement, and for its targeted effort to bring much-needed family practice physicians to our community. This is a significant step to help expand access to quality care for our communities in the beautiful, remote areas of our state.”

State Assemblyman Frank Bigelow echoed Sen. Borgeas’ sentiment. “Sutter Health has long supported hospitals in more rural regions of California and they understand how family doctor shortages can have a negative impact on a community’s health,” Bigelow said. “I am so pleased they are pursuing this program and continuing their investment in bringing needed primary care physicians to Amador communities.”

Drs. Greer and Hartmann expect the program to be successful in filling the need for well-trained, community-minded primary-care physicians in Amador County and the greater Mother Lode region.

“The medical students applying for this residency opportunity will enter the program with a strong desire to serve in rural communities,” said Dr. Hartmann, “so their career focus will be the health and well-being of families in our towns and smaller cities. This is great for the future of health care in our community.”

For more on the Sutter Family Medicine Residency Program, go to www.suttermd.com/education/residency/family-medicine

Sutter Roseville Moves Up Opening of ER-ICU Expansion to Prepare for COVID-19 Patient Surge

Posted on Apr 27, 2020 in Access to Care, Scroll Images

Sutter Roseville Medical Center expansion
Sutter Roseville Medical Center is opening its expansion a month early to prepare for a potential surge in COVID-19 patients.

ROSEVILLE, Calif. – Sutter Roseville Medical Center on Tuesday, April 28, is opening its expansion of emergency and critical care services a month early as part of its preparations for a potential surge of COVID-19 patients. Originally slated to open May 27, the 98,400-square-foot expansion doubles the Emergency Department and nearly doubles the number of critical-care beds, adding 58 more private rooms that can safely care for patients during a possible surge.

Sutter Roseville began the $178 million construction project in 2017 to meet the growing community’s demand for emergency services, critical-care rooms and interventional cardiac and neuro procedures. It is connected seamlessly to the existing Emergency Department on the first floor and surgical and critical care services on the second.

“When our team met in late February to discuss surge preparations for COVID-19, it was apparent that we needed to move up the opening of this expansion to ensure we had the highest level of care available for the expanding needs of our community and region,” said Sutter Roseville CEO Brian Alexander. “Our staff, construction partners, and state and local agencies all banded together and worked diligently to open this expansion 30 days early, but to the same high safety and quality standards.”

As a Level II trauma center serving a seven-county region, Sutter Roseville provides a higher level of care in emergency situations and is regularly preparing for public health crises. The expansion was designed with elements that will assist in those emergencies, including two emerging infectious disease isolation rooms and options to convert the Emergency Department’s expansive lobby into a treatment area in case of a large-scale disaster or patient surge.

Expanded emergency department looby

“When our care teams helped design this expansion, they took into account numerous possible health-crisis scenarios,” Alexander said. “Because of their foresight and planning, Sutter Roseville is prepared to care for patients during this pandemic and other public-health emergencies.”

The new expansion helps Sutter Roseville stay on the forefront of exceptional, innovative care. Its features include:

  • 34 additional emergency beds in private treatment rooms, increasing the total number of emergency beds to 68;
  • Seven emergency triage areas that are equipped to provide treatment to patients;
  • 24 additional ICU rooms, each equipped with the latest eICU telemonitoring capabilities that allow specialized physicians to assist in the care of the patients from a remote hub. Added to the 32 existing critical-care beds in the hospital, there will be 56 ICU rooms available for the sickest patients if a surge were to occur;
  • Two interventional labs providing the latest technology for cardiac catheterization procedures. A third interventional lab is currently being built with additional capabilities for neuro and radiological procedures.
New intensive care unit room

“California is being challenged in new ways during the COVID-19 public health crisis, and we are rising to that challenge in ways large and small across the state,” said California State Sen. Jim Nielsen, R-Tehama. “Here in Northern California, one of the organizations stepping up to meet the challenge is the Sutter Health network, providing new levels of emergency and critical care at Sutter Roseville Medical Center that are so urgently needed across the region.”

The expansion provides a critical need in the community beyond the current global pandemic crisis. The Sutter Roseville Emergency Department expanded in 2005 to treat up to 60,000 patients a year, but last year saw more than 84,000 patients. The additional ICU rooms and interventional labs are also necessary additions as South Placer County is seeing more elderly patients requiring a higher-level of care.

Emergency department isolation room

“Strong infrastructure is one of the hallmarks of a strong community, and our capacity for protecting and promoting public health is central to that,” said State Assemblyman Kevin Kiley, R-Rocklin. “Sutter Roseville Medical Center’s continued investment in our public health infrastructure helps drive our ability to prevent disease, heal after injury or illness, and respond to both chronic health challenges and acute ones like COVID-19. My thanks to Sutter Health for stepping up to help when and where they are needed.”

This is the latest in a series of expansions Sutter Roseville Medical Center has experienced in the past two decades, transforming it from a community hospital into a regional, tertiary medical campus. The other expansions include:

  • A newly constructed Patient Care Tower with 90 new beds.
  • Expansion of the Family Birth Center to accommodate a community need as young families moved into South Placer County.
  • The addition of a Level III NICU with 16 licensed beds to provide advanced life-saving care to critically ill newborns.
  • The construction and expansion of Sutter Rehabilitation Institute, the region’s only facility dedicated exclusively to acute rehabilitation services.
  • The Sutter Cancer Center, Roseville, a facility dedicated to and designed by those with cancer.
  • Three medical office buildings that house Sutter Roseville physicians, along with two parking garages for staff and patients.

“As a healthcare provider, as an employer and as a supporter of this community, Sutter Roseville Medical Center has already been a strong force for good here and across Placer County and the region,” said Roseville Mayor John Allard. “Expanding its top-notch emergency service and critical care – especially now – builds on a decades-long commitment to serving the people of Roseville and beyond.”

COVID-19 Heightens our Love for Mother Earth, and One Another

Posted on Apr 22, 2020 in Community Health, Scroll Images

A message from Stephen H. Lockhart, M.D., Ph.D., Sutter Health Chief Medical Officer and Executive Sponsor of Sutter Health’s Environmental Stewardship Program

With fewer cars on the road and less traffic in the skies, some news outlets have reported a climate benefit. While none of us wanted this short-term positive effect at such high health and economic costs, we are getting a peek at an environment with less human interference — a brief glimpse at what could be possible if we took steps to reduce waste and advance alternative energy solutions in the years ahead.

As champions of health, we know that nature holds a special place in our lives, supporting our mental and physical wellbeing. It’s never been more important to take a walk outside, take a deep breath, enjoy the sunshine and wave at our neighbors — all while staying 6 feet apart, of course. Nature lifts our spirits and helps restore our hope.

Please join our Sutter team in celebrating the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Mobilizing to care for our planet over the long term is one more way we’re showing our love for our communities and one another.

Here are a few ways you and your family can get involved with Sutter’s sustainability efforts:

1. Plant a garden. Digging your hands in the soil is good for your health. Welcome spring by planting native plants, fruits and vegetables. Take it a step further by starting a compost pile. Composting food waste reduces the amount of waste you send to a landfill, and once it fully decomposes, you’re left with a fertilizer for your garden. Check out some simple tips on composting from the EPA.

2. Donate clothing. While spring cleaning, consider donating unwanted items rather than throwing them away. Each year, nearly 40,000 gallons of water are used in the production and transport of new clothes bought by the average American household.

3. Watch creativity grow. Promote your kids’ love for our planet by encouraging them to create art from natural or recycled materials.

4. Conserve water. Install a low-flow shower head to reduce water use. In one year, a family of four can save up to 18,200 gallons of water.

5. Carry a reusable water bottle. Lessen your environmental impact by replacing your single-use plastic bottles with a stainless-steel water bottle or travel mug.

6. Calculate your carbon footprint. Simply reducing the amount of time we spend running errands, driving to work and to other activities plays a significant role in reducing our carbon footprint. Check out the EPA’s Carbon Footprint Calculator.

7. Learn about sustainability efforts at Sutter Health. Did you know that Sutter completed five solar-power projects; launched a pilot program to reduce the amount of harmful anesthetic gasses released into the atmosphere during surgeries; and increased plant-based meals by 20% in our 24 hospital cafeterias? You can find out more here.

How a Pandemic Launched a NorCal Healthcare System

Posted on Apr 14, 2020 in Integrated Network, Scroll Images

Spanish Flu
A nurse takes a patient’s pulse in the influenza ward at Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 1, 1918. Photo courtesy of Library of Congress.

The pandemic started slowly in Sacramento. For weeks, residents of the city believed what was going around was just the usual flu that arrived every fall. But in just two months, thousands in the city had been infected and about 500 Sacramentans were dead.

That happened a century ago. Because of the inadequacy of the existing Sacramento hospitals to care for the numerous victims of the Spanish flu in 1918, local doctors and civic leaders banded together to build a new, more modern hospital to meet the growing city’s needs.

Sutter Health was born.

Begun as a single Sutter Hospital kitty-corner to Sutter’s Fort, Sutter Health now has a presence in 22 counties across Northern California, featuring thousands of doctors and allied clinical providers and more than 50,000 employees. As an integrated health system, Sutter is uniquely qualified and capable to care for residents during a health crisis such as COVID-19.

“A group of hospitals and doctor’s offices are able to band together, share resources, skills and knowledge, and institute best practices to care more effectively and efficiently for our patients and the communities we serve,” said Dave Cheney, the interim president and CEO of Sutter Valley Area Hospitals and the CEO of Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento. “We have systems in place that we test all the time to ensure we are prepared for many crises, including a pandemic like COVID-19.”

Groudbreaking
Just a few years after the devastating Spanish flu, Sacramento physicians, nurses and civic leaders gathered to break ground in 1922 for the first Sutter Hospital.

Physicians Fill a Need in Sacramento

The deadly influenza commonly called Spanish flu killed about 50 million worldwide. From August 1918 to July 1919, 20 million Americans became sick and more than 500,000 died, 13,340 of them in California. In Sacramento, slow action by the city public health office delayed care and, within a couple of weeks, sick residents flooded the hospitals. The city library was even converted into a makeshift hospital. A Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento history recounts: 

“The influenza epidemic of 1918 gave convincing evidence to Sacramento doctors that the city’s two major hospitals were woefully inadequate to provide the health care services vital to the rapidly growing community. The flu epidemic had sorely taxed these facilities and highlighted the need for a modern, fireproof hospital. Recognizing the critical need for hospital care for their patients, 17 local physicians came together with civic leaders to create a new hospital.”

The group incorporated as Sutter Hospital Association in 1921, naming it after its neighbor, Sutter’s Fort, which cared for Gold Rush pioneers as Sacramento’s first hospital. The first Sutter Hospital was built two years later and opened in December 1923 as “the most modern hospital to be found in the state,” according to The Sacramento Bee. It was the first private, non-sectarian hospital in the city, and the first to offer private rooms.

The hospital became not-for-profit in 1935 and changed its name to Sutter General Hospital. It opened Sutter Maternity Hospital in 1937 two miles away and it soon expanded its services and was renamed Sutter Memorial Hospital. In the 1980s, the old Sutter General Hospital was replaced by a modern facility across the street from Sutter’s Fort, and in 2015 all adult and pediatric services were combined under one roof when the Anderson Lucchetti Women’s and Children’s Center opened essentially in the same location as the original Sutter Hospital.

First Sutter Hospital
The first Sutter Hospital opened in December 1923 as California’s “most modern hospital.” Now, Sutter Health is an integrated healthcare system that includes 24 hospitals in Northern California.

A Health Network Grows

The 1980s and 1990s saw tremendous growth for Sutter. Struggling community hospitals in Roseville, Auburn, Jackson, Davis, Modesto and other nearby cities merged with what was then known as Sutter Community Hospitals. Then came the deal that more than doubled the healthcare system. In 1996, Sutter Community Hospitals merged with a group of Bay Area hospitals and physician groups known as California Healthcare System. These included such large, well-respected, historic hospitals as California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco and Alta Bates in the East Bay. This new system became, simply, Sutter Health.

Now as a model of healthcare integration, Sutter Health provides a user-friendly system centered around patient care — a system that offers greater access to quality healthcare while holding the line on costs. This connectivity allows Sutter teams to provide innovative, high-quality and life-saving care to more than 3 million Californians. Sutter’s integrated care model allows care teams and care locations to use the power of the network to share ideas, technologies and best practices, ultimately providing better care and a user-friendly experience, achieving healthier patient outcomes and reducing costs.

Our Heroes Wear Scrubs
Grateful community members are thanking Sutter Health front-line workers throughout Northern California.

An Integrated Network Fights COVID-19

Today, Sutter Health’s hospitals and physician groups don’t operate in a vacuum. Each hospital is supported by a larger system that can share knowledge and send materials, equipment and even manpower to where they are needed most. The system is called the Sutter Health Emergency Management System, which is organized after the federal government’s National Incident Command System.

Here’s how it works: Part of the Sutter Health Emergency Management System is a team throughout the network that works on gathering and purchasing the necessary supplies and equipment needed during this pandemic, including N95 masks and ventilators. Another team monitors bed space to ensure that each hospital can care for a COVID-19 patient surge. Clinical team members across the network are working together to address any issues that may unfold and to share best practices as they treat coronavirus patients.

That’s the power of a not-for-profit, integrated healthcare network.

“We are leveraging the strength of our united teams to increase our capacity and knowledge, and to provide the necessary equipment,” Cheney said. “We are preparing all of our network hospitals in the event we see a surge in patients due to COVID-19. Thanks to the integrated system that has been more than 100 years in the making, we are prepared for a pandemic of this magnitude now more than ever.”

The Surprising Place Where COVID-19 Can Appear

Posted on Apr 3, 2020 in Scroll Images, Wellness & Integrative Health

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – If your child is in diapers or is being potty-trained, don’t poo-poo this advice. During this coronavirus pandemic, it may just save your life or that of a loved one.

Paul Walsh, M.D., medical director of the Pediatric Emergency Department at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, says that babies and small children may not show any signs at all of being sick with COVID-19. But the “presents” they’re leaving behind may be especially harmful as they could contain traces of the virus.

Dr. Walsh said hand-washing during this time is important for everyone, but it’s critical for those who are changing diapers or potty-training toddlers.

“One of the cases that came out of China was a child who was orphaned at 6 months old because he was shedding lots of the coronavirus, but had no symptoms whatsoever,” he said. “So remember to wash your hands thoroughly after every diaper change or potty time.”

Dr. Walsh admits that everyone is at risk for catching the virus, but children usually handle such sicknesses much better than adults do.

“Children have vigorous immune systems,” Dr. Walsh says. “It’s not just with this virus, but with most colds and other sicknesses. Their bodies aggressively fight off the sickness.”

With the first death of an infant who tested positive for COVID-19, Dr. Walsh said parents shouldn’t be too anxious.

“There’s no need to freak out,” he said, “but be vigilant with hand-washing and social distancing. Observe your children in their activities. And, especially, keep them away from seniors. They’re still the most at risk.”

Dr. Paul Walsh treats a child in the dedicated Pediatric Emergency Department at Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento.