Posts by Angie

Juneteenth: A Day for Celebration, Education and Connection

Posted on Jun 18, 2020 in Health Equity, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Juneteenth is the oldest-known celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States. Although the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 declared all slaves free, it was not until two and a half years later, on June 19,1865 that Union soldiers landed in Galveston, Texas and informed slaves that the Civil War had ended and slavery had been abolished. The news kicked off widespread celebrations across the state.

Sutter Health joins in the celebration of this historic event, but the realities of today are sobering.

One hundred and fifty-five years later, racism still exists in our country and freedom for Black Americans remains elusive. The killing of George Floyd is an example of the systemic racial injustice Black Americans have endured for centuries in the U.S.

“Sutter Health affirms that Black Lives Matter and encourages us all to speak up and raise our voices against racism and to advocate for systemic change,” says Stephen Lockhart, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer and executive sponsor for Sutter’s Multicultural Inclusive Resource Group.

Sutter Health President and CEO Sarah Krevans says, “Our Sutter values compel us to speak out against inequity in healthcare and injustice and racism in our society. Within Sutter, our organization has an unyielding commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion, and we work to embed it into our culture. We know there is more to be done and are committed to it.”

Sutter takes pride in caring for one of the most diverse patient populations in our nation. Dr. Lockhart is leading a national effort to advance health equity and address health disparities that exist for patients in healthcare across the country. “We know that inequities exist in healthcare and we’re focused on being a national leader to address those disparities and improve healthcare for all. To the extent we are able to make a difference, we have a moral obligation to do so.”

Building a Path Toward Health Equity

Posted on Apr 16, 2020 in Scroll Images

Across the nation, new data is illustrating a startling trend in the spread and impact of COVID-19: inequity. Between Illinois, North Carolina, South Carolina and New York alone, statistics are showing that African Americans are 74% more likely to contract the virus as compared with their total percentage of the state’s population.

While this new data is grabbing headlines and startling communities across the nation, inequities in healthcare outcomes are unfortunately not new news. As we observe Black Maternal Health Week (April 11-17), it is important to highlight that this is especially true for Black mothers, who are still roughly three times more likely to die due to pregnancy related causes.

The United States is facing serious challenges in how we care for expectant mothers and infants. A report in December of 2018 by the Commonwealth Fund found that American women have the greatest risk of dying from pregnancy complications among developed countries. (Munira Z. Gunja, n.d.)

Yet, California appears to be an outlier. California continues to perform better than the national average on maternal mortality with 11.7 deaths per 100,000 live births versus the national average of 17.4 deaths.

This was not always the case. Prior to 2006, the state’s maternal mortality rate had doubled in seven years – and black women were approximately four times more likely to die in childbirth than other ethnic groups.

In response, in 2006, Sutter Health leaders helped spearhead the creation of a multi-stakeholder organization, the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC), to address maternal mortality and maternal health. The work done through CMQCC helped reduce California’s maternal mortality rate by 55% between 2006 and 2013.

Sutter’s partnership with the CMQCC and our work with their California Birth Equity Collaborative – a quality improvement initiative to improve birth care, experiences and outcomes for Black mothers – is helping to lower preventable maternal deaths or unexpected outcomes that have significant short, or long-term health effects on new mothers.

Sutter’s collaborative efforts have fostered real and much-needed progress, but there is still much more to do. We are committed to using robust data and collaborating with other providers and patients to make meaningful improvements to address equity gaps and improve patient-centered outcomes.

Building on this effort, two years ago Sutter created an ‘Advancing Health Equity’ team – led by Sutter’s Chief Medical Officer Stephen Lockhart, M.D., PhD – dedicated to identifying and addressing the issue through targeted, community-based programs. We are using innovative tools like the groundbreaking Health Equity Index that include analytic methods and dynamic applications of clinical and population data to measure outcomes of care among different patient populations. By reporting on these quality measures by race and ethnicity, we can identify previously unknown differences within populations, share best practices, and identify the need for targeted interventions and solutions.

Within Sutter’s own network, there is currently no inequity in race or ethnicity when it comes to maternal mortality. However, we know that 80% of what drives health outcomes happens outside the walls of our facilities. That is why it is so important that Sutter Health live up to our responsibilities as a national healthcare leader, and continue to research, innovate, and quantify the value of our integrated system of care for the benefit of other healthcare leaders throughout the state and the nation.

“I am so proud of Sutter Health’s long-standing commitment to improving health outcomes for our Black mothers, ” said Dr. Lockhart “COVID-19 reminds us more must be done to address health disparities and advance equity across the U.S. Everyone deserves the chance to live a healthy life.”

As long as inequities exist, the work will continue, but the successes we have seen and the initiatives that we are currently working on help to provide a clearer look at how we can do our part to advance health equity for all.

Food Safety During COVID-19

Posted on Mar 16, 2020 in Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Tips to keep you safe

Many people are making trips to the grocery store or using food delivery services right now. So how do you know your food is virus-free when it gets to your doorstep?

According to the USDA, “We are not aware of any reports at this time of human illness that suggest COVID-19 can be transmitted by food or food packaging.” However, experts say it’s still important to follow good food hygiene.

Here are simple steps you can take to try and limit your exposure to coronavirus. Many of these tips will sound familiar, but they are good reminders.

Wash your hands
Wash your hands regularly with soap and water. This is one of the best ways to protect yourself and others in your home from the spread of germs. Remember to clean the ‘webs’ between fingers and thumbs. Don’t have access to soap and water? Use hand sanitizers.


Wash your produce
Whether you’re concerned about the coronavirus or not, you should always wash your produce. For hard-skinned produce, scrub skins or peels with a soft-bristled vegetable brush. For other types of produce, including leafy greens, soak in water for 10 to 15 minutes. Plain water is fine. You can also use a little dish soap. However, do not use bleach or chlorine on your fruits and veggies. Still concerned? Try fruits that can be peeled such as bananas, oranges and apples.

Wash nonporous containers
Use dish soap on metal cans, plastic containers and glass jars before putting them away. It’s also a good idea to wash you hands after opening containers and boxes.

Keep your kitchen area clean
Use disinfectants to clean your surfaces such as countertops, your refrigerator door handle, sink handle and cabinet knobs. This will not only kill viruses but also help you avoid food-borne illness from possible cross contamination.


Cook food properly
You can help ensure you’re cooking food at the correct heat, by using a food thermometer. Check the government’s safe cooking temperature chart.

“Eating fresh fruits and vegetables, and other foods rich in antioxidants has consistently been shown to increase overall health, including our immune systems,” says William Isenberg, M.D., Sutter’s chief quality and safety officer. “Staying healthy increases the body’s ability to fight infections. “

By taking a few common-sense precautions, such as frequent hand-washing and washing produce, consumers can continue to reap the health benefits of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Dr. Isenberg’s bottom line advice: “Use serious concern and precaution, but do not panic and give up healthy food that’s good for your mind and body.”

For more food safety tips click here.

Dramatically Different Healthcare: Sutter Health’s CEO Talks About What She Sees in the Future

Posted on Aug 27, 2019 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Sutter Health President and CEO Sarah Krevans

Sutter Health President and CEO Sarah Krevans sat down with The Advisory Board President Eric Larsen. The in-depth article digs into a number of subjects including the value of integrated health systems, the challenges of delivering the healthcare of today while planning for the healthcare of tomorrow, healthcare competition in Northern California and Krevans’ personal interests.

The article provides an exceptional look into the complexities of today’s healthcare marketplace, and how Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network delivers on its mission by providing safe, personal, affordable and accessible care to patients and communities.

 

Sutter Health and Anthem Blue Cross Reach Multiyear Agreement that Protects Patient Choice

Posted on Mar 20, 2019 in Uncategorized

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Sutter Health and Anthem Blue Cross today announced that they have reached an agreement that continues to provide consumers access to the integrated Sutter Health network through Dec. 31, 2022.

This agreement applies to Anthem Blue Cross Medi-Cal, HMO and PPO products and provides continued in-network access to Sutter Health affiliated providers and facilities.

“Sutter Health is pleased that we have reached a multiyear agreement with Anthem Blue Cross that provides patients with access to Sutter Health’s high quality integrated network while keeping care affordable,” said Sutter Health President and CEO Sarah Krevans.  “We value the relationship we have with our patients and the ability to continue to serve them.”

Impacted patients with questions can call the number on the back of their Anthem ID card or visit  www.sutterhealth.org/anthem.

Sutter Health’s integrated network includes 24 hospitals, five medical foundation and 36 outpatient surgery centers that provide care to more than 3 million patients.