Posts by Dean

Beanies for Babies: CPMC Nurse Gives Back by Making Snuggly Hats

Posted on May 3, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, People, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO–June Shiraki R.N., started her career in nursing in 1993 as a nurse’s aide in telemetry at the California Pacific Medical Center’s (CPMC) Pacific Campus. She followed in the footsteps of her mother who started working at CPMC’s California Campus in 1974. But it was a patient that really encouraged June to actually become a nurse and follow her passion to care for others.

In the spirit of generosity and to thank patients for having their babies at CPMC, June crochets a beanie-style hat for each newborn in her care. She receives heartfelt thank-yous every time she presents a hat to a mother. Shiraki acknowledges that patients keep the hats as generational keepsakes, some going to lengths of preserving them in hope chest. She even has “repeat” patients!

“It is amazing how people come back and ask for me when they deliver their next child,” said Shiraki. “I even have people who recognize me when I am traveling in Hawaii or Tahoe and they come up to me to say how wonderful their experience was.”

According to “hat math” calculations, Shiraki crochets 20 hats a week, which totals more than 1,000 hats a year. “I didn’t realize how many hats I have made. I guess I make a lot of hats,” she exclaimed. “Everywhere I go I have a ball of yarn and a needle so I am crocheting all the time…even on the plane to Hawaii.”

Shiraki is happy and appreciative to be the second generation in her family to work at CPMC. She also expresses gratitude for her patients and thinks fondly of the one who set her life’s work into motion. “I am thankful for the positive interactions I have with patients. It is just so heartwarming and I am happy to give back in the name of Camilla, the patient who inspired me to become a nurse to begin with.”

 

Robotic Germ Zapper Helps Bring Down Infectious Disease

Posted on Apr 18, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SAN FRANCISCO –A germ-zapping robot called LightStrike from Xenex is used at California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) hospitals to help curb the spread of infectious diseases. This mobile robotic device is used in intensive care units, medical surgery units, operating rooms and in rooms where patients suffering from Clostridioides difficile (also known as C. diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other microorganisms, were discharged. CPMC, part of Sutter Health’s integrated network of care in Northern California, now employs this mobile robotic technology at all campus locations—with a total of seven in operation.

The LightStrike robot emits 67 bright pulses of (UV) light per second that bounce into walls, floors, ceilings and hard-to-clean places where manual cleaning might miss. The UV light is absorbed by and fuses the DNA of microorganisms, causing the cell to break apart and dissolve, deactivating pathogens. A patient room can be disinfected in less than 15 minutes using this system.

The LightStrike robot is not a replacement for manual disinfecting and cleaning by staff. It is another tool used in the hospitals to enhance staffs’ efforts to combat infectious diseases and to create a safer, cleaner environment for patients and their families.

Internal data shows a decline in infectious diseases at CPMC due to an overarching effort associated with training, improved hand hygiene, and diligence in disinfecting patient rooms after discharge — which includes the use of the Xenex technology.

Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Sutter Roseville Medical Center –CPMC’s sister hospitals in the Valley — also use the Xenex germ-zapping robots to assist in their efforts to disinfect rooms. They have also seen similar declines in rates of infectious diseases.

 

One of Nation’s Top Residency Programs is Magnet for Future Family Doctors

Posted on Apr 12, 2019 in People, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency Program Selects 12 Graduates for Class of 2022

SANTA ROSA-Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (SSRRH) Family Medicine Residency Program announced its 2019 incoming class who will graduate the program in 2022.  Twelve of the nation’s top medical school graduates were selected from 747 applicants for this three-year program. The nationally recognized Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency program is one of 450 family medicine training programs in the United States and has trained hundreds of family physicians since its inception in 1938.

The 12 graduates who will begin the training program in July came from medical schools across the country; Drexel University, University of California Irvine, Texas Tech University, University of California Davis, Michigan State, University of Washington, Western University, Geisel School of Medicine, University of Massachusetts, Wayne State University, University of Maryland, and University of Wisconsin. They each come with an impressive background of academic achievement and community service.

The residency program is a critical strategic healthcare asset in confronting the emerging physician shortage in Sonoma County. The residency has been the largest single source of family physicians to Sonoma County for over 70+ years.  Residency graduates comprise nearly half of family physicians in Sonoma County. They fill private practices, community clinics, and large medical groups such as Sutter Medical Group of the Redwoods, The Permanente Medical Group, local community health centers, Sonoma County Health Services and leadership positions throughout the medical community.

The Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency is under the sponsorship of Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (SSRRH). To provide a broader base of support for the residency and optimize learning experiences for residents, SSRRH engaged Santa Rosa Community Health Centers, Kaiser Permanente, Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital and or St. Josephs Health as affiliate partners in the community.

About the Sutter Health Family Medicine Residency Program

With the initiation of formal training in general practice dating back to 1938, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (and formerly Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa) has an established tradition of excellent training of family physicians with the strong support of community physicians and specialists. In 1969, the program became affiliated with what has since become the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

CPMC Advanced Maternity Care with Nations Highest Maternity Age

Posted on Apr 4, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Carousel, Scroll Images, Women's Services

SAN FRANCISCO – Yuan-Da Fan, M.D., chairman of the obstetrics and gynecology department at California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), a part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network, recently interviewed with Robert Honda of NBC Bay Area public affairs program, Asian Pacific America, to discuss the trend toward older motherhood.

While this is a national trend it is particularly noticeable in the Bay Area. At CPMC the average age of mother delivering babies is the highest in the nation at 34.4 years of age. The oldest mother to deliver a baby at CPMC was 58.

“Across the entire country the maternity age is getting older, especially in San Francisco where we have highly educated and professional women”, said Dr. Fan. “Many women pursuing higher educational degrees and advancement in their careers are delaying motherhood until they achieve these goals.”

While delayed motherhood is increasingly becoming more common, Dr. Fan cautions that it carries additional risk. “Advanced maternal age, mothers over age 35, is associated with higher risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, cesarean delivery, complications during labor, and fetal abnormalities” Dr. Fan added.

Women over age 35 are advised to consult with their OBGYN provider to determine their risks associated with having a baby. Providers look at family background, medical history and other determinants to assess if the risks are great or not.

“We intend to continue providing the safest care to our older and complicated patients while also extending our support for low intervention births,” Dr. Fan stated. “Our goal is to celebrate each and every birth with successful outcomes and happy memories for all of our patients.”

 

CPMC Van Ness Campus Hospital: Real Estate Deal of the Year

Posted on Mar 29, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO –The San Francisco Business Times honored Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center Van Ness Campus Hospital with a Real Estate Deal of the Year recognition in their Superlative category. The Superlative recognition is for projects and deals that stood out for their size, significance and complexity. CPMC was one of six in this category. Overall 33 deals, projects and people were recognized this year by the San Francisco Business Times.

The new $2.1 billion, 11-story CPMC Van Ness Campus Hospital opened in March and has 274 acute-care beds that bring together inpatient services from two of its other hospitals. Now, eyes are on how its debut might transform the Van Ness corridor, which, CPMC CEO Dr. Warren Browner pointed out, used to be lined with car dealerships.

“Even though by any measure it is one of the grand avenues of San Francisco, it has never had much of an identity other than City Hall…at one end of it,” Browner said. “What will be really interesting to me as a San Franciscan is to see how this changes the neighborhood — whether it becomes more of a focus for healthcare.”

Writes the San Francisco Business Times in a March 27 article about the deal: “The main impetus for the CPMC campus was new state seismic safety standards that require hospitals to stay standing and functional after an earthquake. To tackle this, the hospital was the first project in the U.S. to open with viscous wall damper technology. The dampers use steel and a thick fluid to act as shock absorbers during an earthquake. Using them allowed the project to ultimately cut costs after testing showed the building wouldn’t need some of the usual seismic systems in addition to the dampers, said Kent Hetherwick, SmithGroup project manager for the CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital.

The zero-lot-line site required all kinds of other innovation on the part of SmithGroup and others working on the project. They used techniques such as 3-D modeling, preassembly and prefabrication to improve their coordination in advance of their actual time on site.

The end result? It’s an ‘incredibly beautiful and functional’ space that came in well under budget and delivered everything that was hoped for it, Browner said.”