Posts by Dean

Specially-Designed Pacifier Uses Music to Teach Premature Infants How to Feed

Posted on Jun 14, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Pediatric Care, Quality

Parents’ Voice Singing a Lullaby Rewards Baby for Sucking

Alissa and Charles O’Neill with baby Olive

SAN FRANCISCO—Premature babies often lack a developed sucking reflex, leaving them unable to feed orally. And the inability to feed is a common reason new born babies remain hospitalized after birth. To help develop the sucking reflex more quickly, California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), part of Sutter Health’s not-for-profit network of care, is using a new device called a Pacifier-Activated Lullaby (PAL) in its Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

According to CPMC’s music therapist Elisha Madsen, MME, MT-BC, recent studies show that about 70 percent of the premature infants who receive PAL treatment respond positively to it. They increase their ability to eat on their own, gain weight, and go home from the NICU earlier.

Charles O’Neill and baby Olive at home

The PAL rewards and motivates babies to suck on a pacifier to help strengthen their sucking reflex. The special pacifier is attached to a sensor module that measures the strength of the baby’s sucking reflex. When the PAL detects that the baby has sucked on the pacifier to the predetermined strength, the baby earns a reward –a lullaby recorded by the baby’s own mom or dad.

Madsen explains that hearing their parent singing a lullaby motivates babies to continue sucking on the pacifier –which improves the sucking reflex. “Within two and a half minutes, she says, “most babies learn they will have to suck on the pacifier to receive their music reward.”

“It’s exciting for us at CPMC to be able to offer parents a direct role in their baby’s care where they are the reason the baby’s health is improving,” said Madsen. “Parents just light up when they see their baby responding to their singing voices and learn the skills they need to eat and go home. It is just precious to see this reaction.”

Dad’s Best Father’s Day Gift? Bonding with Baby!

Posted on Jun 14, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Quality

SAN FRANCISCO –On this Father’s Day we celebrate the bonding between dads and their newborn babies. While the focus of childbirth and postnatal care typically revolves around mother and baby, and with good reason, research shows that dads can also have an incredible impact on their babies in the days after birth.

Fathers who engage in skin-to-skin contact, often called kangaroo care, with their newborns can positively impact their child’s physical and emotional health immediately. Skin-to-skin contact helps create a bond between dad and baby and helps elevate a father’s natural parenting instincts. Practicing kangaroo care also helps dads become more sensitive and aware of their baby’s needs, and more confident about their parenting skills.

For the baby the benefits are many, says Terri Slagle, M.D., director of the neonatal intensive care unit at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center’s Van Ness Campus hospital. “Frequent skin-to-skin contact increases brain development and decreases stress responses. By holding his baby to his chest, dad creates a sense of security which can lead to a reduction in irritability and improved sleep, and helps to foster a regular and stable heart rhythm and breathing pattern,” Dr. Slagle says.  “It can also lead to weight gain for the baby as he or she develops better absorption and digestion of nutrients following skin-to-skin contact.”

Simply put, skin-to-skin contact stimulates the baby’s immune system and promotes physical and emotional wellbeing for both dad and baby while developing a stronger bond for the long term.

Royal Baby Birth Celebrated at CPMC’s Van Ness Campus with Newborn Coronations

Posted on May 6, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, People, Scroll Images, Women's Services

Brittney and Trevor Moore with baby girl Harlow

San Francisco—Newborns at California Pacific Medical Center’ (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital celebrated the royal

Kunal Jain and Isha Bhatnayar with baby boy Kiaan Jain

baby’s arrival on May 6 with nine newborn births of their own, each presented with a gold crown. These eight girls and one boy will forever share a special day with the royal couple’s new arrival.

The crowns these babies are donning were hand-made by CPMC nurse, June Shiraki, who’s been crocheting beanies for newborns at CPMC for the past 7 years. Coronations took place throughout the day as the new babies eased into their first day. Nurse Shiraki was on hand to help assist with coronations as we celebrated this day with the Sussexes.

 

Beanies for Babies: CPMC Nurse Gives Back by Making Snuggly Hats

Posted on May 3, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, People, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO–June Shiraki R.N., started her career in nursing in 1993 as a nurse’s aide in telemetry at the California Pacific Medical Center’s (CPMC) Pacific Campus. She followed in the footsteps of her mother who started working at CPMC’s California Campus in 1974. But it was a patient that really encouraged June to actually become a nurse and follow her passion to care for others.

In the spirit of generosity and to thank patients for having their babies at CPMC, June crochets a beanie-style hat for each newborn in her care. She receives heartfelt thank-yous every time she presents a hat to a mother. Shiraki acknowledges that patients keep the hats as generational keepsakes, some going to lengths of preserving them in hope chest. She even has “repeat” patients!

“It is amazing how people come back and ask for me when they deliver their next child,” said Shiraki. “I even have people who recognize me when I am traveling in Hawaii or Tahoe and they come up to me to say how wonderful their experience was.”

According to “hat math” calculations, Shiraki crochets 20 hats a week, which totals more than 1,000 hats a year. “I didn’t realize how many hats I have made. I guess I make a lot of hats,” she exclaimed. “Everywhere I go I have a ball of yarn and a needle so I am crocheting all the time…even on the plane to Hawaii.”

Shiraki is happy and appreciative to be the second generation in her family to work at CPMC. She also expresses gratitude for her patients and thinks fondly of the one who set her life’s work into motion. “I am thankful for the positive interactions I have with patients. It is just so heartwarming and I am happy to give back in the name of Camilla, the patient who inspired me to become a nurse to begin with.”

 

Robotic Germ Zapper Helps Bring Down Infectious Disease

Posted on Apr 18, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Innovation, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

SAN FRANCISCO –A germ-zapping robot called LightStrike from Xenex is used at California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) hospitals to help curb the spread of infectious diseases. This mobile robotic device is used in intensive care units, medical surgery units, operating rooms and in rooms where patients suffering from Clostridioides difficile (also known as C. diff), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other microorganisms, were discharged. CPMC, part of Sutter Health’s integrated network of care in Northern California, now employs this mobile robotic technology at all campus locations—with a total of seven in operation.

The LightStrike robot emits 67 bright pulses of (UV) light per second that bounce into walls, floors, ceilings and hard-to-clean places where manual cleaning might miss. The UV light is absorbed by and fuses the DNA of microorganisms, causing the cell to break apart and dissolve, deactivating pathogens. A patient room can be disinfected in less than 15 minutes using this system.

The LightStrike robot is not a replacement for manual disinfecting and cleaning by staff. It is another tool used in the hospitals to enhance staffs’ efforts to combat infectious diseases and to create a safer, cleaner environment for patients and their families.

Internal data shows a decline in infectious diseases at CPMC due to an overarching effort associated with training, improved hand hygiene, and diligence in disinfecting patient rooms after discharge — which includes the use of the Xenex technology.

Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Sutter Roseville Medical Center –CPMC’s sister hospitals in the Valley — also use the Xenex germ-zapping robots to assist in their efforts to disinfect rooms. They have also seen similar declines in rates of infectious diseases.