Posts by Dean

One of Nation’s Top Residency Programs is Magnet for Future Family Doctors

Posted on Apr 12, 2019 in People, Scroll Images, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency Program Selects 12 Graduates for Class of 2022

SANTA ROSA-Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (SSRRH) Family Medicine Residency Program announced its 2019 incoming class who will graduate the program in 2022.  Twelve of the nation’s top medical school graduates were selected from 747 applicants for this three-year program. The nationally recognized Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency program is one of 450 family medicine training programs in the United States and has trained hundreds of family physicians since its inception in 1938.

The 12 graduates who will begin the training program in July came from medical schools across the country; Drexel University, University of California Irvine, Texas Tech University, University of California Davis, Michigan State, University of Washington, Western University, Geisel School of Medicine, University of Massachusetts, Wayne State University, University of Maryland, and University of Wisconsin. They each come with an impressive background of academic achievement and community service.

The residency program is a critical strategic healthcare asset in confronting the emerging physician shortage in Sonoma County. The residency has been the largest single source of family physicians to Sonoma County for over 70+ years.  Residency graduates comprise nearly half of family physicians in Sonoma County. They fill private practices, community clinics, and large medical groups such as Sutter Medical Group of the Redwoods, The Permanente Medical Group, local community health centers, Sonoma County Health Services and leadership positions throughout the medical community.

The Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency is under the sponsorship of Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (SSRRH). To provide a broader base of support for the residency and optimize learning experiences for residents, SSRRH engaged Santa Rosa Community Health Centers, Kaiser Permanente, Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital and or St. Josephs Health as affiliate partners in the community.

About the Sutter Health Family Medicine Residency Program

With the initiation of formal training in general practice dating back to 1938, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (and formerly Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa) has an established tradition of excellent training of family physicians with the strong support of community physicians and specialists. In 1969, the program became affiliated with what has since become the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

CPMC Advanced Maternity Care with Nations Highest Maternity Age

Posted on Apr 4, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Carousel, Scroll Images, Women's Services

SAN FRANCISCO – Yuan-Da Fan, M.D., chairman of the obstetrics and gynecology department at California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), a part of the Sutter Health not-for-profit network, recently interviewed with Robert Honda of NBC Bay Area public affairs program, Asian Pacific America, to discuss the trend toward older motherhood.

While this is a national trend it is particularly noticeable in the Bay Area. At CPMC the average age of mother delivering babies is the highest in the nation at 34.4 years of age. The oldest mother to deliver a baby at CPMC was 58.

“Across the entire country the maternity age is getting older, especially in San Francisco where we have highly educated and professional women”, said Dr. Fan. “Many women pursuing higher educational degrees and advancement in their careers are delaying motherhood until they achieve these goals.”

While delayed motherhood is increasingly becoming more common, Dr. Fan cautions that it carries additional risk. “Advanced maternal age, mothers over age 35, is associated with higher risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, cesarean delivery, complications during labor, and fetal abnormalities” Dr. Fan added.

Women over age 35 are advised to consult with their OBGYN provider to determine their risks associated with having a baby. Providers look at family background, medical history and other determinants to assess if the risks are great or not.

“We intend to continue providing the safest care to our older and complicated patients while also extending our support for low intervention births,” Dr. Fan stated. “Our goal is to celebrate each and every birth with successful outcomes and happy memories for all of our patients.”

 

CPMC Van Ness Campus Hospital: Real Estate Deal of the Year

Posted on Mar 29, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO –The San Francisco Business Times honored Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center Van Ness Campus Hospital with a Real Estate Deal of the Year recognition in their Superlative category. The Superlative recognition is for projects and deals that stood out for their size, significance and complexity. CPMC was one of six in this category. Overall 33 deals, projects and people were recognized this year by the San Francisco Business Times.

The new $2.1 billion, 11-story CPMC Van Ness Campus Hospital opened in March and has 274 acute-care beds that bring together inpatient services from two of its other hospitals. Now, eyes are on how its debut might transform the Van Ness corridor, which, CPMC CEO Dr. Warren Browner pointed out, used to be lined with car dealerships.

“Even though by any measure it is one of the grand avenues of San Francisco, it has never had much of an identity other than City Hall…at one end of it,” Browner said. “What will be really interesting to me as a San Franciscan is to see how this changes the neighborhood — whether it becomes more of a focus for healthcare.”

Writes the San Francisco Business Times in a March 27 article about the deal: “The main impetus for the CPMC campus was new state seismic safety standards that require hospitals to stay standing and functional after an earthquake. To tackle this, the hospital was the first project in the U.S. to open with viscous wall damper technology. The dampers use steel and a thick fluid to act as shock absorbers during an earthquake. Using them allowed the project to ultimately cut costs after testing showed the building wouldn’t need some of the usual seismic systems in addition to the dampers, said Kent Hetherwick, SmithGroup project manager for the CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital.

The zero-lot-line site required all kinds of other innovation on the part of SmithGroup and others working on the project. They used techniques such as 3-D modeling, preassembly and prefabrication to improve their coordination in advance of their actual time on site.

The end result? It’s an ‘incredibly beautiful and functional’ space that came in well under budget and delivered everything that was hoped for it, Browner said.”

When Experience Counts…

Posted on Mar 22, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO — With 38 years of experience, Dr. Fung Lam has delivered more than 5,600 babies at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) and has identified many pregnancy complications that resulted in referrals to specialists. When San Francisco resident Aliisa Rosenthal came to Dr. Lam, during the early stages of her pregnancy

KGO interviews Dr. Fung Lam about Molar Pregnancy

with her second child, everything appeared to be normal.  However, Dr. Lam noticed a rare anomaly on her ultrasound that he had seen before—a molar pregnancy.

A molar pregnancy occurs when the cells that become placental tissue grow at such an accelerated rate that it overwhelms the fetus and typically will not result in a viable fetus. This accelerated growth leads to the development of a tumor which must be surgically removed. Molar pregnancy is rare. In the U.S., 20 women out of 100,000 that will be affected. Women from Asia and South America can experience occurrences as high as 1,300 per 100,000. Of those who experience a molar pregnancy, less than 10 percent result in the tumor being malignant. After a molar pregnancy, 98 percent of women later go on to have normal pregnancies.

According to Dr. Lam, with the use of ultrasound, prenatal care starts much earlier than it did years ago. This allows obstetricians to often identify pregnancy complications much earlier. Because of Dr. Lam’s past experience with identifying the subtitles of a molar pregnancy, Aliisa’s situation was identified early at about nine weeks. She is now doing well and spending precious time with her husband and 2-year-old daughter.

“Blessed in Multiple Ways”: First Twins Born at the New CPMC Van Ness Campus Hospital

Posted on Mar 6, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images

SAN FRANCISCO – On Monday, March 4, Dien Ngueyn and Alexander Hsu of Oakland welcomed the first twins to be born at the newly-opened Van Ness Campus hospital. The babies were delivered by Fung-Yee Chan, M.D.

Baby girl Callista was the first to arrive at 2:43 p.m. Callista weighed 6 lbs. 8 oz. and measured 18 inches. Callista’s brother Callan, who arrived a minute later at 2:44 p.m., weighed 7 lbs. 2 oz. and measured 20 inches.

The twins’ parents chose to deliver at Sutter’s CPMC because of the medical center’s outstanding reputation of care in the maternal and fetal medicine program.

During a routine amniocentesis, to screen for developmental abnormalities in a fetus, a benign growth was found in baby Callan’s lung. The parents soon discovered why Sutter’s CPMC enjoys a stellar reputation for maternal and fetal medicine. Immediately upon finding the lung abnormality, CPMC staff connected the family with Regina Arvon, M.D., a geneticist and obstetrician at Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation (SPMF) who specializes in multifetal pregnancies. Mom began receiving seamless care from a multi-disciplinary team that monitored and reviewed the progress of the both babies’ development, as well as changes in Callan’s medical condition.

Dr. Arvon explains that CPMC and SPMF’s multi-disciplinary approach in maternal and fetal medicine program is “like an incubator designed to care for the family.” As baby Callista and Callan were born, a team stood ready in the delivery room to provide diagnostics and specialty care to immediately address the birth defect, if needed.

The care team is happy to report that both infants are doing well and that they will continue to monitor baby Callan to determine future steps to care for him as both children transition into their home in Oakland.