Posts by dugase

Dr. Steve Lockhart Honored for Skill and Service

Posted on Apr 11, 2019 in People, Quality, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Sutter’s Chief Medical Officer Stephen H. Lockhart, M.D., Ph.D., has received a Distinguished Alumni Award from National Medical Fellowships (NMF). The award honors Dr. Lockhart for his commitment to improve healthcare and his passion for humanitarian work.

“Your leadership at Sutter Health, along with your wide-ranging experience as a healthcare administrator, academic achievements and remarkable philanthropic work, particularly your inspiring efforts in Haiti, make you a true role model and someone our young scholars should emulate as professionals,” wrote Esther R. Dyer, M.D., NMF president & CEO, in a letter to Dr. Lockhart.

NMF honors individuals who have made a lasting impact on healthcare and in the communities they serve. NMF is a nonprofit organization that provides scholarships and support for underrepresented minority students pursuing a career in medicine or the health professions.

NMF is the only national association solely dedicated to providing scholarships and support to students across all minority groups underrepresented in healthcare. NMF scholars come from low-income, minority, immigrant, urban and rural communities and demonstrate financial need.

NMF improves access to quality healthcare in medically underserved communities by increasing diversity the healthcare workforce. Learn more at www.nmfonline.org.

 

 

Your Gifts Help Us Bring the Emergency Department to the Patient

Posted on Mar 20, 2019 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Quality, Research, Scroll Images

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S. and the leading cause of adult disability, affecting 800,000 people a year. Time is critical for people who experience a stroke—every minute saves 2 million brain cells.

 

Every minute counts when treating a patient who has had a stroke. Donor support for the Mobile Stroke Unit gives us the tools to help ensure that patients in our community not only survive, but also avoid the debilitating effects of a stroke. Through a research trial this project will also help to inform best practices in stroke treatment nationwide —impacting the care of thousands.

The Mills-Peninsula Hospital Foundation has launched a $2.4 million fundraising campaign to underwrite the cost of operating the Unit for the first 2 years, while a randomized controlled trial is conducted to gauge the effectiveness of the program compared to conventional care.

Invest in the Mobile Stroke Unit.

Preliminary studies have indicated that a Mobile Stroke Unit can reduce the time from ambulance dispatch to treatment to as little as 11 minutes. Sutter Health affiliated Mills-Peninsula Medical Center is the only hospital in Northern California and one of only two hospitals in the state to have a Mobile Stroke Unit.

To Mend a Broken Heart: Sutter Health Starts eCPR Protocol in San Mateo County

Posted on Mar 15, 2019 in Cardiac, Community Benefit, Innovation, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

BURLINGAME, Calif. — If you’ve ever watched a televised medical drama, you’ve probably seen a doctor yell “clear” before delivering a jolt of electricity to re-start a patient’s heart. Unfortunately the shows make it seem like the defibrillator works every time. In reality, it doesn’t. Sometimes a faulty heart rhythm won’t return to normal even after multiple shocks, and if the problem is a blocked artery, no amount of shocks will help. In these cases, a patient’s only hope is to receive CPR while they are rushed to a hospital, and once there, receive advanced life support until doctors can repair their heart.

These two life-saving steps form the basis for a new emergency response protocol, called eCPR, which has the potential to decrease deaths from sudden cardiac arrest by 30 percent. Sutter Health affiliated Mills-Peninsula Medical Center is the first hospital on the West Coast to adopt this new protocol, which was proven effective in a 2016 study by Minneapolis-St. Paul area hospitals.

 

‘Hands Free’ Device Performs CPR During Transport

Until recently, it’s been next to impossible to perform effective CPR while in transit. “Our protocol has been to perform CPR at the scene and start transport only if we can stabilize the patient,” said John Kammeyer, Fire Chief, San Mateo Central Fire. Unfortunately many patients never stabilize – and 95 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims die before they even reach a hospital.

The widespread use of a mechanical CPR device is set to change that. The device, known as LUCAS (Lund University Cardiac Arrest System), continuously delivers the same 2-inch chest compressions that a human hand would during traditional CPR, but the machine makes the process “hands free.” This means that emergency medical technicians (EMTs) can start their drive to the hospital sooner. A LUCAS device is carried on every San Mateo Fire rig that serves the county and two of the LUCAS devices now in the field were donated by Mills-Peninsula Medical Center community benefit.

ECMO Buys Time for Treatment

Once a patient arrives at Mills-Peninsula Medical Center the second life-saving step – advanced life support – comes in. A special machine called ECMO or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, pumps oxygenated blood through the patient’s body, allowing the heart and lungs to rest while an emergency cardiac procedure is performed.

ECMO can support patients for days to weeks while doctors treat their underlying heart condition and give the heart time to heal. “Historically ECMO has only been used in support of a planned cardiac procedure,” said Joe Walsh, M.D., an interventional cardiologist with Palo Alto Medical Foundation. “Under this new protocol we’re using ECMO on an emergency basis, but time is still of the essence.”  This expanded use of ECMO can only be accomplished if the hospital has trained supportive personnel at the ready – which Mills-Peninsula Medical Center does.

Mills-Peninsula Medical Center launched its ECMO program in 2017 and has treated approximately 25 adults per year with the technology. Dr. Walsh is director of the ECMO Program and has seen first-hand that gallant CPR efforts and rapid use of ECMO can save lives.

Spotting the Signs: Sutter Health Athletic Trainers Address Student Concussions

Posted on Mar 12, 2019 in Affiliates, Community Benefit, Novato Community Hospital, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Novato, Calif — New research studies on concussions have shown that left untreated, they can cause serious long-term health problems—a frightening prospect for student athletes and their families. In 2014, Novato Community Hospital (NCH) and Novato Unified School District came together to help. They teamed up to improve concussion detection and injury prevention for the district’s more than 1,600 student athletes across 21 different sports. The result was the NCH Athletic Trainer Program.

Designed by the NCH Orthopedics Department and supervised by the department chief, the program takes a holistic approach to safeguard the health and safety of student athletes. Launched in 2015, it funds two full-time certified athletic trainers, one at San Marin High School and one at Novato High School, who work with students on a daily basis, attending all practice sessions and games where high-impact sports are played. “The certified athletic trainers are healthcare professionals that are educated on and experienced in the evaluation and management of athletic injuries, including concussions,” said Jennifer Lehr, director of orthopedic services at NCH.

 

The trainers identified concussion symptoms in 47 local student athletes in 2017, all of whom needed to see a doctor. “Without this intervention, they may have continued on the field, risking permanent injury,” said Steven Dehart, the certified athletic trainer at San Marin High School.

In addition to in-the-moment concussion assessment, the certified athletic trainers also conduct extremely detailed computer-based pre-injury concussion testing at the start of every school year to establish each student’s unique brain-health baseline. Later in the year, if a concussion occurs during practice or play, the severity of injury can be objectively measured to provide information vital to medical treatment.

Finally, the certified athletic trainers provide student athletes and school coaches with basic sports medicine training, including how to avoid common bone, joint and muscular-skeletal injuries. “We really focus on injury prevention,” Lehr said. “The ultimate goal is to enhance the student-athlete experience and establish good habits now for lifelong health and well-being.”

The Athletic Trainer Program is made possible through the support of the community. The Novato Community Hospital Foundation funds a portion of the program and donors have supported the purchase and licensing of the computer-based pre-injury concussion testing software, as well as a portion of the salaries for the certified athletic trainers. In addition, donations covered the cost of advanced software the radiologists at NCH needed to conduct susceptibility weighted imaging during an MRI, which can more precisely diagnose brain injuries. Novato Community Hospital covers the remainder of program costs through community benefit investments. The Novato Unified School District provides oversight, infrastructure and acts as the first point of contact with parents.

Tiny Twin Fighters Will Win Your Heart

Posted on Mar 8, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Scroll Images, Uncategorized, Women's Services

The road ahead it twists and turns .  . . but I keep, keep on pushing through,” sings John Isaac in the soulful song titled I Get Up. This song is the perfect anthem for Mason and Logan, fraternal twins, who need the specialized care of doctors and nurses at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus. The neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU, is a special section of the hospital dedicated to babies born early or with delicate medical  needs. In the NICU babies gain weight and develop a little more every day until they are healthy enough to go home.

At Sutter we want all of our patients to be at their strongest and the spirit of these two twin fighters matches our mission and echoes these poignant lyrics: “With every step my heart it pounds, yes I’m sure I’ve had my doubts, but I must keep, keep on pushing through. Yeah I get up, and I may fall right back down – but your love lifts me back to solid ground.” Thank you, Mason and Logan, for showing us how to keep on pushing through.