Posts by boarmaa

Sutter’s Self-Prescribed Eco-Rx Shows Impact

Posted on Feb 18, 2020 in Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Organization snags 2019 SEAL Business Sustainability Award; Employees and leadership charged up to do more in 2020!

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Sutter has dialed up its sustainability efforts in recent years. The not-for-profit organization’s environmental stewardship committees have made major strides towards minimizing waste, increasing energy efficiency and creating healthier communities for patients and their families.

In 2019 alone, Sutter completed five solar power projects, launched a pilot program to reduce the amount of harmful anesthetic gasses released into the atmosphere during surgeries, and increased plant-based meals by 20 percent in its hospital cafeterias.

For strides like these—and more, Sutter received a 2019 SEAL Business Sustainability Award. SEAL –Sustainability, Environmental Achievement and Leadership – honored the organization for stepping up as one of four founding members of the California Health Care Climate Alliance. The alliance brings significant healthcare experience and a combined voice to the legislative and regulatory process to advocate for and enact climate-smart policies. Additionally, Sutter was recognized for having developed a comprehensive sustainability campaign focusing on several key initiatives, including energy conservation and greenhouse gas reduction, for which it showed results.

Sutter Health awarded 2019 SEAL Business Sustainability Award.
Sutter Health awarded a 2019 SEAL Business Sustainability Award.

“At Sutter Health, caring for our planet is integral to our mission of fostering healthier environments,” said Steve Lockhart, M.D., PhD, Sutter Health chief medical officer and executive sponsor of Sutter’s Environmental Stewardship Program.

Sutter Takes a Proactive Approach to Sustainability

As the organization looks to the decade and environmental challenges ahead, its commitment to sustainability has never been stronger. Here are three ways Sutter is continuing to address sustainability across its integrated network:

• The organization is a major supporter of MedShare, a non-profit that delivers surplus medical supplies and equipment to communities in need around the world. In the last 10 years, Sutter has contributed more than $11 million worth of lifesaving medical supplies to improve global health and has eliminated 1 million pounds of waste, such as patient beds, from reaching landfills.

• Sutter recently received a major grant from the State of California for a pilot program where ten of its hospitals—Memorial Hospital Los Banos; Memorial Medical Center; Sutter Tracy Community Hospital; Sutter Amador Hospital; Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital; Sutter Davis Hospital, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento; Sutter Roseville Medical Center; Sutter Solano Medical Center and Sutter Surgical Hospital North Valley—are donating leftover food to local nonprofits to feed the hungry. As part of this grant, Sutter will be able to track where the food goes across Northern California and show its impact.

• Sutter’s Building Renewal Program is also making significant investments in existing buildings with the goal of creating greater efficiency and reducing emissions. Solar panels have been installed at seven campuses across the network, which represents a reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7 million pounds per year. This is equivalent to the GHG emissions for 674 passenger vehicles driven for one year or the CO2 emissions from 3.5 million pounds of coal burned for one year. In 2020, the team is evaluating many more campuses to see if installing solar is viable. Sutter is also continuing its electric vehicle charging station program.

Pledging to Do More

Sutter Health recognizes healthcare’s role in climate change. As such, it is prepared to do what it can to support Northern California’s dynamic ecosystem for the better. This commitment extends to Sutter’s nearly 60,000 employees.

“Each of us can play a role—even by making one small change to our daily routines,” said Dr. Lockhart.

Employees across Sutter’s integrated network have been invited to take a sustainability pledge to commit to making a positive impact on the environment, at work and at home in 2020.

Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital Names New CEO, Dan Peterson

Posted on Feb 2, 2020 in People, Scroll Images, Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital, Uncategorized

SANTA ROSA, Calif. Sutter Health announced today it has selected Dan Peterson as chief executive officer of Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital (SSRRH), effective Feb. 3. Peterson succeeds Mike Purvis who served as CEO since 2009 and is retiring. As CEO, Peterson will manage all administrative and health care activities for the hospital and provide overall leadership and direction for all hospital physicians and staff. Peterson will also lead facility growth and improvement efforts at Sutter Santa Rosa, including a $173 million hospital expansion and renovation slated for completion in 2022.

“Dan is a skilled hospital administrator and the perfect choice to lead Sutter Santa Rosa and move our mission forward,” said Julie Petrini, president and CEO of Hospitals, Sutter Health Bay Area. “We are pleased to welcome Dan and his family back to the Santa Rosa area and look forward to a bright future as we expand the high-quality health care offered in Sonoma County.”

About Dan Peterson

Dan Peterson studied Economics at Brigham Young University in Utah and completed a master’s degree in Health Services Administration at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He started his career as a director for ambulatory services at UCLA Health System in Los Angeles before moving into roles of increasing responsibility. This included the CEO and Administrator role at The Surgery Center of Santa Rosa for nearly five years. Since 2017, he has served as Chief Administrative Officer for Sutter Lakeside Hospital.

Peterson has a track record for excellence in quality, patient experience, and staff engagement. During his time at Lakeside, the hospital achieved top hospital in Sutter Health for Quality performance in both 2018 and 2019, and top hospital in Sutter Health for Patient Experience in 2018. Peterson also oversaw the complete hospital evacuation and repopulation during the Mendocino Complex Fire, among other accomplishments, and is an active participant in professional organizations, including the American College of Healthcare Executives.

“It continues to be a privilege to work in the Sutter Health network alongside the best and brightest physicians, medical and administrative staff in Northern California,” said Peterson. “I am humbled and honored to now lead more than 1,500 men and women at SSRRH who provide exceptional and high-quality care.”

About Sutter Health
Sutter Health is more than 60,000 people strong thanks to its integrated network of physicians, employees and volunteers. Rooted in Sutter Health’s not-for-profit mission, these team members partner to deliver exceptional care that feels personal. From physician offices to hospitals to outpatient care centers and home services, they proudly support the more than 3 million people in their care—nearly 1 percent of the U.S. population, in one of the most diverse and innovative regions in the world. Sutter team members adopt new technologies, make novel discoveries and embrace creative thinking to help patients and communities achieve their best health. From its street nurse program that provides check-ups for homeless people, to telemedicine-aided specialist consultations, to walk-in care clinics, to video visits, the Sutter Health team goes beyond traditional models to make care more convenient and to nurture and empower people throughout their healthcare journey.

For more information about the Sutter Health network visit: sutterhealth.org | facebook.com/sutterhealth | youtube.com/sutterhealth | twitter.com/sutterhealth

Colorful Baby Keepsake Doubles as Medical Diary

Posted on Jan 8, 2020 in California Pacific Medical Center, Pediatric Care, People, Quality, Scroll Images

“Tiny Victories of Life” beads track critically ill and premature infants’ medical journeys

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – At Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital, Child Life Specialists help parents mark their critically ill or premature newborns’ milestones using colorful beads and charms with the “Tiny Victories of Life” program.

Just ask new mom Amanda Bates about her son Asher’s Tiny Victories strand of beads.

“Each bead that has a figure represents an achievement of that day,” says Bates, while holding a string with nearly 40 beads.

Critically ill and premature babies at CPMC spend their first weeks or months fighting to achieve crucial health markers. Child Life Specialists use the aptly-named “Tiny Victories of Life” program as visual storytelling to document and celebrate each baby’s remarkable journey.

Amanda Bates’ son Asher, who arrived six weeks early, is steadily hitting important milestones that babies in the hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are required to reach before discharge.

The program was started in 2016 by hospital Child Life director, Lori Denault, who modeled it after “Beads of Courage,” a similar national initiative that tracks patient progress using beads. (Sutter Medical Center in Sacramento participates in Beads of Courage.)

Blue beads represent individual days, while special charms represent significant or personally meaningful achievements such as a duck charm for baby’s first bath or a music note each time baby receives music therapy. Asher’s Tiny Victories strand includes a red bead to mark meeting Santa Claus because he spent his first Christmas in the hospital.

The Tiny Victories of Life program encourages parents to forge a strong bond with their newborns—which can be a challenge when a baby is very ill and must remain in the hospital for a long period of time after birth. Beads are added to the strands each week during one-on-one family sessions or at a NICU parent group meeting.

Bates Family
Kyle and Amanda Bates pose with baby Asher at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus hospital.

CPMC Child Life Specialist Shannon Banahan says, “Tiny Victories is a way for parents to look forward to the progress their baby is making. Families can get overwhelmed in thinking about the long and seemingly never-ending days in the NICU. But once they look back on their beads and see how far their baby has come, it feels like there’s an end in sight and makes them hopeful and proud.”

On Asher’s discharge day, he received the final bead in his strand—the butterfly bead, which signifies he’s ready to spread his wings.

“Receiving the butterfly bead is always emotional for parents, both because they are leaving this community of nurses and new parent friends and also because they are finally being able to start this new chapter of life at home with baby,” says Banahan.

Holiday Cheer is the GOOOOOOOAL!

Posted on Dec 20, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Uncategorized

San Jose Earthquakes players visit patients at CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – Smiles stretched from ear-to-ear at California Pacific Medical Center’s Van Ness Campus hospital as players from the San Jose Earthquakes Major League Soccer team sought to unwrap joy for patients in the Sutter facility’s Novack Family Child Life Services and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

San Jose Earthquakes players Tommy Thompson and Shea Salinas visit patients at CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital for the holidays.
San Jose Earthquakes players Tommy Thompson and Shea Salinas visit patients at CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital for the holidays.

Quakes teammates Tommy Thompson and Shea Salinas weren’t shy about bringing their holiday spirit A game. Eager and excited, the duo visited with several patients and their families in their rooms. Patients’ faces lit up as Tommy and Shea talked with them, snapped selfies and handed out toys, games and Quakes soccer balls.

“Even patients’ parents got in on the action, especially the dads,” said Lori Denault, child life specialist at CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital. “It can be hard to get excited about the holidays when your child is in the hospital, so having this kind of fun distraction is beneficial for the health and well-being of the entire family.”

CPMC Van Ness Campus hospital is celebrating its first holiday season in its new facility, having opened in March 2019. CPMC offers many healthcare options for pediatric specialty care. These include a state-of-the-art birthing center, a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Novack Family Child Life Services. The adjacent Medical Office Building, emphasizing the benefit of Sutter Health’s integrated network, provides even more pediatric offerings, including CPMC’s Newborn Connections