Posts by Monique

Stroke and Heart Attack Rapid Response: Timing is Everything!

Posted on May 13, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

May is National Stroke Awareness Month

If you or a loved one is experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 or visit your nearest emergency room.

SAN FRANCISCO –Fear of exposure to COVID-19 shouldn’t keep you away from the emergency department – especially if you’re experiencing signs of stroke or heart attack.

Sutter emergency departments have COVID-19 precautions in place and the capacity to treat those in need. Safety measures include masking patients; keeping patients with COVID-19 symptoms away from common waiting areas, entrances and other patients; arranging for environmental service staff to perform extra cleaning and disinfecting; visitor restrictions (with a few exceptions) and requiring all staff to have their temperature taken before each shift. (Read more here.)

Each year, thousands of people come to Sutter emergency departments with stroke or heart attack symptoms.

David Tong, M.D., director of the Mills-Peninsula Medical Center Stroke Program and regional director of stroke programs for Sutter’s West Bay Region said in a recent interview with The Mercury News, that as a result of people avoiding hospitals for fear of exposure to the coronavirus, some things like CAT scans or MRIs may be easier to schedule now than they were six months ago.

Time is of the essence for treatment of strokes and heart attacks in order to forestall long-term consequences.

With Stroke, Time = Brain
“For strokes in particular, the faster you treat the patient, the better the outcome,” Tong says. “This is not the time to ignore important symptoms because you’re going to miss the opportunity for treatment. We have all appropriate emergency department and hospital protocols in place to keep patients safe.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an easy way to remember the most common signs of stroke and how to respond is with the acronym F.A.S.T.:

F = Face drooping: Ask the person to smile. Does one side droop?
A = Arm weakness: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
S = Speech difficulty: Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Are the words slurred?
T = Time to call 9-1-1: If a person shows any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately. Stroke treatment can begin in the ambulance.

With Heart Attack, Time = Muscle
Experts warn “time is muscle” with heart attacks. The longer treatment is delayed, the more damage can occur to the heart muscle – and the chances for recovery decrease.

According to Brian Potts, M.D., medical director of the emergency department at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s Berkeley campus, the most common symptom of heart attack for men and women is pain or discomfort in the chest or in other areas of the upper body (in one or both arms, back, neck, jaw or stomach). Other symptoms include shortness of breath (with or without chest discomfort); breaking out in a cold sweat; nausea or lightheadedness.

“It’s vital to treat heart attacks as soon as possible. Our best-case scenario is a patient who comes to the emergency department as soon as symptoms begin. Many people rationalize away chest discomfort or jaw pain as a momentary digestion issue, but it’s better to be safe than sorry,” says Potts. “If you’re in so much pain or discomfort that you’re wondering, ‘should I go to the emergency department?’ the answer is probably yes.”

Sheltering in Place May Not Keep You Safe from Falls: Tips to Protect Yourself at Home

Posted on May 11, 2020 in Affiliates, Eden Medical Center, Safety, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

CASTRO VALLEY, CALIF. –According to the National Council on Aging, more than 75 percent of falls happen inside or near the home where people often feel safer and roam without thought to the safety hazards around them. With the current shelter in place orders keeping people home, focusing on fall prevention is even more necessary.

Kimberly Windsor, R.N., who is the trauma program manager for Sutter’s Eden Medical Center says, “Falls are the majority of traumas seen at Eden and a few minor changes can help you avoid a fall.”

Home Safety
Look around your home, paying attention to walkways, bathrooms, kitchen, and bedrooms.

For general use areas: keep the floor clear of clutter that can be a tripping hazard. Keep a phone within reach should you need to call for help (especially near the bed at night). Secure floor rugs with double sided tape or slip resistant backing.

Bathrooms: remember that towel racks are not grab bars. Grab bars should be properly installed near the tub/shower and toilet. Use nonslip strips or mats in and outside the shower. Avoid the water being too hot, which can cause dizziness or burns. Keep a towel close to avoid losing your balance when reaching.

Kitchen: place frequently used items within reach. Putting things within reach will help you avoid relying on a step stool or chair that you can easily lose your balance on. If you use a step stool, make sure it has a handle for safe usage. Remove any rugs or floor mats that are not secured to the floor with nonskid tape or rubber backing. Clean up spills immediately—kitchen floors can be slippery and dangerous when wet.

Bedroom: make sure there is a nightlight to light the walkway or a light within reach of the bed should you need to get up at night.

Minor changes in your home environment will help you avoid falls. Other adjustments can also help: make sure you eat properly, limit alcohol consumption, take prescribed medications only as directed, and get enough exercise.

Exercise
Remember that exercise is important to keep your body strong and prevent falls. If you feel comfortable walking around outdoor in your neighborhood, make sure to watch for cars and follow all traffic signals while crossing streets. If you prefer to stay home, you can find ways to exercise like marching/walking in place, following along with an exercise show on television, or putting on music and dancing around your newly clutter-free floors!

During these times of shelter in place, safety is on everyone’s mind. With a few simple changes and care you can take the steps to be safe in your home to prevent falls.

The Future is Now: Video Visits Explode in Light of COVID-19

Posted on May 11, 2020 in Expanding Access, Innovation, Scroll Images

Whether at home or in the hospital, patients getting the support they need


“It is transformative—I don’t think we’ll ever go back to practicing medicine in the same way we did B.C. — before coronavirus.”

Albert Chan, M.D.

SACRAMENTO –In what may herald a cultural shift in how patients and their doctors interact, video visits have increased at an astonishing rate across Sutter’s not-for-profit integrated network of care since the outbreak of COVID-19 in California. According to Albert Chan, M.D., Sutter Health’s chief of digital patient experience, video visit volume has grown by 350-fold since the pandemic.

“Our digital health initiatives are critical to Sutter’s efforts to respond to COVID-19,” said Dr. Chan. “As we shelter-in-place, digital health enables the human connections that we need to care for our community.”

Video visits, also called telemedicine, offer an alternative way to get care from home for respiratory illness, as well as everyday concerns such as minor injuries, infections, chronic disease management and palliative care. With many clinicians in the Sutter network now offering video visits, patients can book a video visit directly with their provider through their My Health Online account or by calling their clinician’s office.

Read more about Telehealth at Sutter Health.

From Great Challenges Comes Great Opportunity

“Telemedicine is perhaps the only silver lining of this horrible pandemic,” says Aarti Srinivasin, M.D., an internal medicine physician with Sutter’s Palo Alto Medical Foundation. “It is transformative. I don’t think we’ll ever go back to practicing medicine in the same way we did B.C. — before coronavirus. Each and every day will be shaped by the way we practice medicine A.C.—after coronavirus.”

To further expand access to video visits and other digital innovations, philanthropy teams across the Sutter Health network pooled resources to make $1.5 million available for a system-wide purchase of iPads. So far, 950 iPads have been deployed to patients and clinicians in isolation while about 2,000 units have been provided to physicians to conduct video visits. Through this continued philanthropy partnership, 1,000 additional iPads will soon support telemedicine efforts, with a goal to ultimately equip thousands more physicians in Sutter’s integrated network of care.

Video Visits Inside the Hospital?

But the shift isn’t just for those who are following stay-at-home orders. Video visits have now branched beyond clinical support to patients who are hospitalized. Connection with loved ones can have a profound impact on the human spirit. In these difficult times however, it can be easy to feel isolated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), continues to recommend maintaining a connection with loved ones, even if just digitally, throughout this pandemic.

To bring some comfort to hospitalized patients, Sutter’s Emergency Management System assembled a work group to lead the charge in securing iPads for Sutter hospitals. In about two weeks, the work group provisioned nearly 1,000 iPads to hospitals across the Sutter network. The iPads allow hospitalized patients to connect with family and friends, helping to improve their overall care experience.

“I had the honor of helping the son of a patient visit with his mom via FaceTime on the new iPads,” said Caryn Brustman, R.N., a clinical manager who works at Sutter Roseville Medical Center. “The son was in full military uniform and was deploying soon, but wanted the opportunity to say goodbye to his mom before he left.”

In addition to allowing patients to keep in touch with their loved ones, these iPads help frontline teams save valuable PPE. The care team can check in with a patient before entering the room, eliminating visits before a patient is ready. This also allows support staff like chaplains and social workers, who aren’t typically allowed in these rooms during the pandemic, to connect face-to-face with patients.

Grants Accelerates Video Visit Access to Palliative Care

This new era in healthcare is now also broadening the reach and potential for other means of telemedicine. A $225,000 grant from the Stupski Foundation is enabling Sutter clinicians to bring vital palliative care services via video visits to Bay Area patients facing serious illness or end-of-life. The grant will provide mobile-enabled iPads to enhance patient care and improve planning for inpatient and ambulatory palliative care teams at California Pacific Medical Center, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Eden Medical Center, Palo Alto Medical Foundation and Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation. The technology provides added capacity via virtual visits and will also expand access to an advance care planning (ACP) video library to facilitate patient and family engagement, virtual ACP discussions for advance health care directive, and Physician’s Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST).

“Through the generosity of the Stupski Foundation, we will now be able to share important ACP tools at our hospitals as well as our ambulatory palliative care, Advanced Illness Management and care management programs—which could not access these resources prior to the COVID-19 outbreak,” said Beth Mahler, M.D., vice president of clinical integration at Sutter.

“We have been inspired by the pandemic response across the Bay Area, in particular from healthcare providers like Sutter Health that are expanding telehealth to deliver care,” says Dan Tuttle, Stupski Foundation director of health. “Thanks to their quick and thoughtful responses, our communities facing the greatest challenges from COVID-19 are receiving the safe, high-quality care they need locally now, and into the future.”

Community members interested in helping these efforts can visit www.sutterhealth.org/give-covid19.

An Unintended Side Effect of Sheltering in Place

Posted on May 8, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Cardiac, Safety, Scroll Images

Fears of the coronavirus are causing some patients to delay or avoid seeking emergency care for a stroke or heart attack. Doctors say every delayed second could put patients at risk for a worse outcome.

If you or someone you know is experiencing an emergency, seek care immediately by calling 911 or going to the nearest emergency department.

OAKLAND, CALIF. – For some people, fear of exposure to COVID-19 outweighs the risk of a heart attack. In “Afraid of going to the hospital,” the San Francisco Chronicle describes how patients like Oakland resident Hany Metwally are delaying critical evaluation and care for fear of the virus. Says Metwally, “I was afraid to have communication with anybody because I am 64 and at high risk for the coronavirus.”

Metwally suffered severe chest pain at home for four days before his son Mohammed Metwally finally convinced him to seek care at Sutter’s Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland. When he arrived at the Alta Bates Summit emergency department in Oakland, the senior Metwally was impressed with how patients with upper respiratory symptoms are kept separate from those experiencing non-respiratory symptoms like himself.

Ronn Berrol, M.D., medical director of the emergency department at Alta Bates Summit in Oakland, understands why some patients may be concerned but, “We want to reassure people that Sutter hospitals and emergency departments have plenty of capacity to care for them and we are taking every precaution to maintain stringent safety guidelines. So if you or a loved one are experiencing severe pain or illness or have a serious injury, please don’t delay care. We are prepared to care for you and protect you from the virus while you are receiving care.”

Junaid Khan, M.D., director of cardiovascular services at Alta Bates Summit, who performed a successful triple bypass on Metwally, says it’s critical for patients to continue to seek care for serious conditions without delay, despite the virus. “People are correct to be afraid, but their risk of delaying cardiac or stroke care puts them at much greater risk than the risk of acquiring COVID-19.”

Read more about the steps Sutter hospitals and emergency departments have taken to protect patients.

Healthcare Hero Salute: Alta Bates Summit Honored by First Responder Parade

Posted on May 8, 2020 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Scroll Images

OAKLAND, CALIF. –Members of local fire and police departments lead a grand procession of first responders to four hospitals to show their appreciation and highlight the dedication of the healthcare professionals working on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.

Staff at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s Summit and Alta Bates campuses were saluted by a mile-long parade featuring dozens of fire trucks and police vehicles, ambulances, motorcycles, two helicopters –and even two mounted police at the Summit campus. The first responders represented local fire departments, law enforcement agencies and medical transport teams from the cities of Oakland, Berkeley and Piedmont, plus Alameda county and U.C. Berkeley.

Sirens wailing, lights flashing and posters waving, the first responders cheered enthusiastically to show their appreciation and respect for Alta Bates Summit staff, nurses and physicians who have worked selflessly to care for our patients and the community in this unprecedented emergency.

“We are thrilled and humbled that the Oakland fire and police departments are honoring Alta Bates Summit Medical Center staff and physicians with this very special salute. We are all in this together and it is our honor to serve our community alongside the first responders during this unprecedented time,” said David Clark, CEO of Alta Bates Summit.

As partners in our collective work to keep the community healthy and safe, a the Oakland Fire Department is honored to join first responders from the East Bay to show our appreciation for all the dedicated health care workers and staff who provide essential care every day, and especially as we grapple with the local impact of the Covid-19 global pandemic,” said Oakland Fire Department Interim Chief Melinda Drayton

Oakland Police Chief Susan E. Manheimer said, “This is our way of showing appreciation to our frontline medical personnel during this health pandemic. We appreciate the hard work being done each day during this challenging time.”

The procession began at Highland Hospital in Oakland, proceeded to Kaiser Oakland, and then visited Alta Bates Summit’s Oakland and Berkeley campuses.