Posts by Monique

Sutter Health Featured in Article on Key Leadership Qualities

Posted on Aug 9, 2019 in Innovation, Scroll Images, Transformation

Chris Waugh, Chief Innovation Officer for Sutter Health

SACRAMENTO, Calif. –OpenIDEO has published a feature article on its blog focused on the “The Three Qualities Leaders Need in an Uncertain Future.” The article showcases Sutter Health’s integrated network, and efforts coordinated by Chief Innovation Officer Chris Waugh to use creative problem-solving to better serve patients and their families.

Delicious Food at a Hospital? Yes! New Summit Cafe Delights Diners

Posted on Aug 8, 2019 in Affiliates, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Scroll Images

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s Oakland Campus also launches room service for patients

 

Dianna Bennett, who works at the Carol Ann Read Breast Health Center, was thrilled to have a cookbook signed by celebrity chef Jet Tila.

(OAKLAND, Calif.) – The new Summit Café and kitchen at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center’s Oakland campus, which opened this week, now offers visitors, staff and physicians food-court style serving stations with a variety of delicious foods and made to order dishes.

During opening week festivities for the Summit Café, celebrity chef and TV personality Jet Tila prepared spicy Korean short rib street tacos and Hawaiian fried rice for a hungry lunchtime crowd. He also signed cookbooks and took selfies with adoring fans. Special chef appearances will be a regular occurrence at the new café.

Room Service for Patients: What they want, when they want it!

The expanded kitchen has made it possible to offer room service to patients at the Oakland campus. Patients select what they want (within their medically-prescribed diet), when they want it from a new restaurant-style menu offering freshly-prepared meals that are delivered within 45 minutes of ordering between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.

The new room service menu is extensive and features vegan and vegetarian options like vegan shepherd’s pie, healthful and tempting dishes such as chili lime chicken and turkey Bolognese pasta, as well as comforting, nourishing classics like chicken noodle or tomato soup. A room service assistant guides patients through the ordering process and helps those with special needs like allergies make appropriate selections.

More fun facts about the new Summit Café:

  • Café accommodates 300 guests in an airy, sunlit-setting
  • More than 100 food options on the new room service menu for patients
  • More than 8,000 square feet of new kitchen space
  • Two steam kettles can make 120 gallons of soup
  • Four walk through refrigerators and one walk through freezer
  • Blast chiller cools a pan of piping hot soup in less than 30 minutes
  • Turbo Chef oven cooks a frozen fish filet in a minute and a half
  • Combi oven can steam and roast at the same time
  • New dishwasher has an air blow dryer like a car wash

 

Reducing Childhood Obesity One Family at a Time

Posted on Aug 7, 2019 in Innovation, Pediatric Care, Scroll Images, Sutter Delta Medical Center, Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation

New Program Aims to Help East Contra Costa County Kids Achieve and Maintain Healthy Weight

 

ANTIOCH, Calif. –Making sure kids eat a balanced diet and maintain a proper weight can be a difficult task. Especially if the child is overweight, obese or a picky eater.

In Contra Costa County the problem is especially acute. Kidsdata.org, a program at the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, compiled data in 2018 by grade level and found that in the county 36.1 percent of fifth graders, 35.7 percent of seventh graders and 33.4 percent of ninth graders are overweight or obese. According to the Centers for Disease Control, overweight or obese children are at high risk of becoming overweight adolescents and adults, placing them at risk of developing chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes later in life. They are also more prone to develop stress, sadness, and low self-esteem.

Richard Singer, M.D., a pediatrician with Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation (SEBMF) based in Brentwood, had become increasingly concerned about the overweight children he sees in his practice and the lack of nutritional counseling services available in eastern Contra Costa County.

So after careful planning, Dr. Singer recently started a pediatric weight management program at outpatient pediatric offices in Antioch and Brentwood. As part of the program, a registered dietician on the staff at Sutter Delta Medical Center sees patients one day a week at an SEBMF care center.

“There is an epidemic of childhood obesity and all of the complications associated with obesity,” Dr. Singer said. “Our community needs resources to help intervene and improve the quality of life of these children. The pediatric dietician will help parents and their children make better food choices as well as providing ongoing support and helping to monitor their progress.”

In June, Elika Vargas, a registered dietitian at Sutter Delta Medical Center, began meeting with parents and their children on Mondays, either in the SEBMF primary care clinic in Antioch or Brentwood. Children from 2 to 18 years of age are referred to her by primary care physicians.

Vargas reviews the child’s medical history and assesses the child’s eating patterns. Her goal is not to put the child on a diet but to guide the child and the parents on how to eat healthy meals. She also asks the parents and child about physical activity, as lack of exercise contributes significantly to being overweight or obese. Follow-up care is important to assess adherence to nutrition recommendations and weight trends.

“The idea is to promote a healthy lifestyle and gradual weight loss, and to teach families about nutrition so they can make these decisions on their own,” Vargas said. “I let them know why they should be eating more whole grains, fruits and vegetables to get the right nutrition.”

Many barriers to healthy eating exist. The availability of convenience and processed foods, larger portion sizes and lack of physical activity are some of the contributors to obesity. Families are busy and eating fast food may be easier than preparing a balanced meal.

It can be difficult to get children to eat fruits and vegetables. Parents have to be willing to be role models by following their own healthy lifestyle with good nutrition and plenty of exercise.

Some of her advice to parents on how to help children adopt a healthy lifestyle includes:

  • Cut out sugary desserts and juices or try fruit-infused water.
  • Avoid processed and convenience foods. Cook meals at home so children are more likely to have enough vegetables and whole grains.
  • Encourage kids to get involved in preparing meals or in helping with grocery shopping.
  • Offer a variety of fruits and vegetables with different colors, flavors and textures.

“With kids you have to offer healthy choices such as fruit and vegetables multiple times,” Vargas said. “It’s persistence and communication.”

 

 

 

 

 

Stanford Health Care and Sutter Health sign letter of intent to explore opportunities to enhance care and improve choice for oncology patients in the East Bay

Posted on Jul 17, 2019 in Expanding Access, Scroll Images, Uncategorized

Story Summary: This LOI formalizes ongoing discussions that began more than a year ago between Sutter Health and Stanford Health Care to expand and enhance clinical integration among their existing, high quality services, with a shared goal of providing patients and their families with coordinated, seamless cancer care in the East Bay. The two organizations are also in discussions about a potential joint venture that would operate an outpatient cancer center in the East Bay.

 

East Bay Area, CA (July 17, 2019) – Sutter Health and Stanford Health Care have signed a letter of intent to formalize discussions focused on opportunities to jointly provide cancer care for patients and their families in the East Bay. Initial activities between the two entities will focus on ways to build upon current and developing cancer related services and care settings already in place within the two organizations’ respective networks, to explore ways to increase access to cancer clinical trials and to make other enhancements to choice and quality of care for East Bay patients and their families.

Discussions also include potential plans to develop an integrated, multi-disciplinary cancer center in the East Bay, modeled on the highly successful Stanford Cancer Center South Bay concept. This outpatient cancer center would serve as a local hub for cancer care and offer East Bay patients and their families access to the most advanced, complete and coordinated care – from screening through survivorship.

“With this new collaboration, Stanford Health Care aims to bring the full complement of its world-class cancer prevention, treatment and clinical research programs to serve patients in the East Bay,” said David Entwistle, president and CEO of Stanford Health Care. “Partnering with Sutter Health, with its well-established, high-quality cancer program in the area, is the ideal opportunity, and we are pleased to move forward with them in this effort.”

“As an integrated network, Sutter Health has proudly provided accessible, high-quality care to our patients across the East Bay for over a century, and we’re excited to build on this legacy,” said Sarah Krevans, president and CEO of Sutter Health. “This announcement is an example of Sutter and Stanford’s shared commitment as not-for-profit health systems to provide quality, compassionate and convenient care, and to do so in a way that delivers the best outcomes for our patients and our community.”

Julie Petrini, president of Bay Area Sutter Hospitals, agreed: “A collaboration between Sutter and Stanford is a natural fit, and one that will establish an unprecedented and easily accessible suite of services for all East Bay cancer patients. We are excited to formalize our discussions with Stanford through this LOI.”

Complete cancer care, delivered locally

The intent of the collaboration is to increase access to high quality, exceptional cancer care for patients as close to home as possible, by building on the integrated care networks of both Sutter Health and Stanford Medicine, with Stanford’s extensive oncology expertise. Both entities have a deep commitment to caring for the whole patient, and together their efforts will surround patients and their families with a full spectrum of coordinated, supportive care. The new East Bay oncology collaboration would help local patients simplify care coordination, reduce travel time, and focus on treatment and recovery.

New opportunities for innovative treatments

The treatment of cancer is a rapidly evolving field. A collaboration between Stanford and Sutter Health would greatly improve access for East Bay cancer patients to new opportunities for clinical care and clinical research, including an expanded array of clinically relevant local and offsite industry- and investigator-initiated clinical trials.

“Working with Sutter Health in the East Bay will broaden opportunities for participation in some of the world’s most innovative cancer treatment trials,” said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the Stanford School of Medicine. “With breakthroughs in the detection, prevention and treatment of cancer and its side effects, Stanford Medicine’s physician-scientists are actively investigating new therapies and working to make sure that they are available to everyone who needs them. This collaboration presents a real opportunity for improvement for patients, and a benefit to the progress of cancer science, as more inclusion enables more discoveries.”

Stanford Health Care and Sutter Health also believe that this opportunity could greatly enhance their shared commitment to health equity by improving access to exceptional care for underrepresented minorities in the community who often lack access to advanced care options and the ability to participate in clinical trials.

Nationally recognized cancer and integrated healthcare

To this collaboration, Stanford Health Care brings its strength as a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, and its leadership as one of the founding members of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, an alliance of 26 of the world’s leading cancer centers dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of care provided to patients with cancer.

Stanford Health Care is consistently recognized as one of the top hospitals in America for cancer care by US News & World Report, recognized for overall quality and safety by Vizient in 2018, and awarded an ‘A’ from The Leapfrog Group’s spring 2019 Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade.

A collaboration with Stanford and Sutter Health would also build on the efficient and high quality of care for which Sutter Health’s integrated network is consistently recognized, and would provide East Bay residents with seamless coordination of cancer care and support services from one caregiver to another.

Four hospitals within Sutter Health, including Alta Bates Summit Medical Center (ABSMC), have been recognized as top hospitals in California by US News & World Report. ABSMC has also received the highest rating (5 Stars) from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hospital Quality Ratings.  Additionally, Sutter Health includes many of California’s top-performing, highest quality physician organizations.

Celebrating Pride Across the Sutter Health Network

Posted on Jul 9, 2019 in People, Scroll Images, Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation, Uncategorized

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – It’s Pride season and Sutter Health employees, physicians and volunteers are bursting with pride and joy at events across Northern

Team Sutter color guard spreads joy at Sonoma County Pride in Santa Rosa

California—and even further afield. So far this year, Sutter teammates have marched, danced and waved flags in San Francisco, Santa Rosa, Davis, Sacramento and Utah. Sutter teams will participate in upcoming Pride events in Castro Valley, Modesto and Honolulu.

“I could not help noticing the smile on my husband Edwin’s face as he waved the rainbow flag. His joy and appreciation was priceless. This day was filled with joy and comfort for all,” said Esteban Ortega Menjivar, Sonoma County Pride Sutter team lead and medical records referral coordinator for Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation.

Team Sutter waves a giant rainbow flag at Sacramento Pride

At the June 9 Sacramento Pride event, about 400 employees, their family members and friends came together to march, dance, wave flags and joyfully celebrate Sutter’s steadfast support for LGBTQ+ teammates and patients. Representing Sutter’s 2019 Pride theme ‘Wave Your Flag,’ the team included a color guard with flags that represented several of the identities within the LGBTQ+ community. The show stopper was a giant rainbow flag, measuring half the length of a football field that billowed in the wind as the Sutter team proudly carried it in the parade.

At San Francisco Pride on June 30, another Sutter team dazzled the crowds with:

  • More than 400 Sutter team members, their friends, family members marching, dancing and waving flags
  • 70 brightly colored flags, including a fabulous color guard, representing gender and sexual identities of the LGBTQ+ community
  • Sutter vehicles, one of them an ambulance with the siren blaring
  • 1 giant rainbow flag, half the length of a football field, carried by the proud Sutter team
  • 1 sparkly float with 16 Sutter teammates aboard, waving and blowing kisses to the crowd

“I felt totally loved,” said Marena McNaney, digital imaging services coordinator at Sutter Auburn Faith Hospital, who was the DJ and master of ceremonies for the Sutter San Francisco Pride parade team and rode on the Sutter float with her wife Claire and her family. “It was such a great feeling to be surrounded by my family, teammates from so many Sutter locations and hearing the cheers from the crowd. I’m so glad to work for such an awesome company that is committed to supporting the LGBTQ+ community.”

The Sutter Pride Inclusion Resource Group (IRG) leads the organization’s participation in Pride events in local communities. The Sutter Pride IRG, one of four employee inclusion groups at the healthcare system, fosters an equitable and inclusive working environment where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning and queer employees, and their supporters/allies, feel a sense of community and opportunity. The group adds value at Sutter by appreciating and promoting diversity and inclusion in the community.

Sutter is committed to leveraging a diverse and inclusive workforce and environment to achieve superior business results and attract, develop and retain the best employees. As it strives to be an employer and provider of choice, Sutter is committed to fostering a culture of inclusion where all individuals feel respected, are treated fairly, and have an opportunity to excel in their chosen careers and reach their maximum potential. To that end, Sutter Health supports Inclusion Resource Groups including Pride, Ability, Multicultural, and Military and Veterans groups.