Teaching South Placer Schoolchildren How to ‘Stop the Bleed’

Posted on May 29, 2019 in Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center

Rocklin Elementary students learn how to “stop the bleed,” an easy skill to learn that could save someone’s life.

SOUTH PLACER COUNTY, Calif. – On Jan. 15, 2019, a gunman went on a shooting spree in Placer County. Multiple rounds were fired and many targets were hit. Two people were struck, one was a tragic fatality and one survived. One of the keys that saved his life was his 8-year-old daughter, who held direct pressure on the bleeding wound.

Per the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), traumatic injuries can affect anyone regardless of their age, race or economic status. In the first half of life, more Americans die from injuries and violence, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls or homicides, than from any other cause of death, including cancer, HIV or the flu. This makes injury the leading cause of death among persons from the ages of 1-44.

In many cases of traumatic injuries, bleeding is a preventable cause of death. The ability to recognize life-threatening bleeding and the ability to intervene effectively can save a person’s life. Whether a bleeding traumatic injury is the result of a home accident or shooting, one person – who is on the scene, at the right time and who has the right training – can save a life.

Sutter Roseville Emergency Department Medical Director Jon Perlstein, M.D., teaches a student how to stop the bleed.

To help save lives, the national Stop the Bleed program was developed by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) in 2015. The goal of the program is to turn the average person into “immediate responders,” the first person at the scene of an injury. This person is rarely a trained medical care provider professional emergency responder. No matter how fast the arrival of emergency services, bystanders will always be first on the scene. A person who is bleeding can die from severe blood loss within minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the bleeding. Those nearest to someone with life-threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.

Team members from Sutter Roseville Medical Center Trauma Services, Emergency Preparedness, Critical Care and the Emergency Department along with American Medical Response, Roseville Fire Department, Auburn Fire Department and Rocklin Fire Department have provided Stop the Bleed training to more than 3,000 students in South Placer County and surrounding areas. These courses can be taught to school-aged children from kindergarten to high school and adult learners. Sutter Roseville has also donated more than 80 Stop the Bleed kits to schools in the Rocklin, Newcastle and Roseville school districts.

Additionally, all staff members at the medical center also receive the training.

“Unexpected injuries, whether accidental or intentional, can occur at their place of work, schools or other public areas,” says Erik Angle, Sutter Roseville Emergency Preparedness Coordinator and registered nurse. “Bystanders are the initial help until help arrives. Being trained, prepared and ready can save lives.”

Kate Carleton, Sutter Roseville Trauma Quality Clinical Education Coordinator, states, “The number one cause of early death from trauma is uncontrolled hemorrhage.  Early direct control of bleeding has been clearly shown to save lives.”

This training can and has saved lives across the country and almost anyone of age can easily learn these lifesaving skills. For more information on the Stop the Bleed Program and possible training, please contact Kate Carleton at carletk@sutterhealth.org.

May 2019 is the first ever National Stop the Bleed Month. This nationwide campaign highlights the importance of Stop the Bleed training and provides the public with information and education through local fire, EMS, and health-care professionals.

Posted by on May 29, 2019 in Quality, Scroll Images, Sutter Roseville Medical Center | Comments Off on Teaching South Placer Schoolchildren How to ‘Stop the Bleed’