Preemie Procession: Our Smallest Patients Make the Big Move

Posted on Mar 3, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, Scroll Images

 SAN FRANCISCO – The hospital halls are teeming with sound, from footsteps and carts, to conversations and overhead announcements. All that noise is just outside, but inside their private room at Sutter’s California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) Van Ness Campus the Wong Dizon family are enjoying quiet time with their daughter, Mayari.

Residents of Daly City, the Wong Dizons had originally planned to deliver at the Van Ness Campus in April, but daughter Mayari came two months early, making her among the last to be born at the California Campus and the first baby to receive care at the Van Ness Campus. “It’s cool to have the California Campus experience and now the Van Ness Campus experience,” said first-time mom Amanda Wong. “This is a beautiful new hospital, and it’s neat that our baby’s first car ride was from one hospital to another.”

The CPMC California Campus has been the birthplace for San Francisco families since 1875 and Mayari was born there in the middle of February 2019. For the past two weeks Mayari remained in the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and today she was transferred to the CPMC Van Ness Campus where she will continue to gain weight and grow until she is healthy enough to go home. The team of experienced doctors and nurses also made the move, bringing their skills to the new Van Ness Campus, which replaces the California Campus.

The NICU at Van Ness Campus has 35 individual rooms – allowing parents to have private time with their baby and even spend the night. “We’ve learned so much about the benefits of skin-to-skin contact, particularly with premature babies, and in private rooms this type of bonding becomes much more possible,” said Yuan-Da Fan, M.D., chairman of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at Sutter’s CPMC.

 

Posted by on Mar 3, 2019 in California Pacific Medical Center, Expanding Access, Scroll Images | Comments Off on Preemie Procession: Our Smallest Patients Make the Big Move